7

All US states have their own policy on what they consider "residency" and what they consider a taxable resident. So for example, California has income taxes while Nevada does not. Lets IMAGINE that Nevada says you can be a resident after a month, California has completely different requirements in determining whether it expects you to pay tax there, ...


4

Since California is the state with the highest state income tax, I assume they have the highest burden for proving you are no longer domiciled there. In fact they themselves point out that they are one of the few states to distinguish between residency and domicile. From CA Publication 1031: Meaning of Domicile The term “domicile” has a special legal ...


3

I would consider it a refund. Imagine the estimate was based on hours, weight, miles, gas, and tolls. You pay 1/2 when they pickup, and 1/2 when they drop off your stuff. Then a week later they send you a check because gas and tolls were less then they estimated. For tax purposes your expenses would be the net of all the payments and refunds. It wouldn't ...


2

Sorry to put a damper on things, but you generally need to be aware of the laws of the applicable to doing business with your customers wherever you are and they are. For example, if you sell things to people in the state of Texas, the state of Texas will expect you to collect sales and use tax and remit that to the state government. If you do business ...


2

If my company hires an entity, they will want proof that they could deduct the relevant payment from their profits (from their VAT bill etc.) and they will want proof that it was legal to hire this entity. So, they will want a bill providing that - and if the entity didn't supply that bill, they may not pay it. They will only pay the entity in a way that ...


2

As a has-done-it I'd like to attempt answering. Please feel free to ask for clarifications/edits if I miss anything. How much time does it take to open a bank account in US? And what is the best way to transfer the money that I have in India to US? And what would be the tax implications for the same? It is usually a same-day process esp going through a ...


1

If you have the paperwork to support that the check is a discount (refund), then it is not income. Otherwise it looks like income.


1

As @Four_lo said, you need to evaluate all the costs associated with the buy and all the costs associated with renting. From there you need to figure out what kinda rent you can charge for the property after you move out. From that you need to subtract management costs, since you likely won't fly to the US anytime your renter has a problem or something ...


1

Not factoring in changes in value to the market take: the cost of borrowing + property tax + 100-300(home repair and possibly first time buyers insurance). Compare that to the cost of rent. Renting also has small additional costs. Buying small is a better financial choice because you'll pay less in interest.


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