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As the car title is in your girlfriend's name, she is the registered owner of the car. Lender is the legal owner of the car. There are couple of options: Let the girl friend trade-in the car: As the title is under your girlfriend's name, she has to visit dealership to trade-in the existing car, there are paper works, where dealership will take care of ...


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Not an answer. No idea why there's the point issue. On bi-weekly mortgages - as you note, there's no magic to the math. Take a 30 year mortgage, and make a 13th payment each year (right? A bi-weekly has the payment every 2 weeks, so 26 payments a year, i.e. 13th payment in total over the year) and the result will be nearly identical. What the lender likes ...


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In Michigan, prepayment penalties beyond 3 years after origination are illegal. (Please note, this is not legal advice and I am not a laywer.) As such, your mortgage documents should include either no prepayment fees or limited to those in the first three years and limited to 1% of those prepayments. Please check your mortgage agreement carefully for this ...


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Do you want to pay points? The biweekly required payment on a mortgage that is paid off in N years is not half the required monthly payment on a mortgage that is paid off in N years. If you want to "get" the "extra monthly payment" each year so that you can pay off the mortgage sooner, change your biweekly payment to be half the monthly ...


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Start by talking with person who is going to create the trust. They know the order that will minimize the cost to you. Besides cost a potential issue is that some lenders will not approve a loan for a house owned by a trust. If the house is already in the trust you might have to remove the home from the trust, then get a new mortgage, and then put it back ...


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You need to change the title first because you can't refinance the mortgage jointly if your significant other isn't on the title Assuming that it's your trust (not joint), I don't think that the order would matter because your will in your trust will dictate what beneficiaries get your equity value of the house regardless of whether you own half or all of ...


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