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17

Keeping a receipt does allow you to verify that the expected amount was charged/debited it also can help when you need to return an item. Regarding double charging, the credit card companies look for that. If the same card is used at the same vendor for the same exact amount in a short period of time the credit card company will flag the transaction. They ...


14

This entirely depends on the individual store's policies. In general, stores are not required to accept returns at all. So when they do accept returns, they can put any conditions they want on them. In the past, the original receipt was the only record of a sale. When you returned the item, they would write on the original receipt, so that it could not ...


14

This is basically done to reduce costs and overhead, with agreement of the credit card issuers. When the card is physically present and the charge is low, the burden of keeping the signed receipts and of additional delays at the cash register is not worth the potential risk of fraud. Depending on the location and the specific charge-back history of the ...


10

According to Wikipedia, the Illinois state sales tax (which is one component of the Chicago rate) can be different on different types of goods (e.g., groceries vs prepared food). It is left as an exercise to the reader to determine whether some particular combination of goods could be purchased under different tax rates so that the total comes to $20.17.


9

I doubt there is anything you can do to convince them you paid, outside of just talking to them, which it seems you already tried. These are the possibilities I can think of for how this happened: The cashier pocketed the money. The cashier misplaced the payment and it has not been found yet. The cashier misplace the payment and someone else pocketed it. ...


7

I've seen many people sign a restaurant credit card receipt and walk away. Easy enough for the wait staff to add a tip and total. I doubt this is a high risk area compared to others, but in general, why not take the receipt for verification, or in the case of a good that can be returned, the receipt might be needed.


5

Exact rules are going to depend on your location, but let me give you some principles. Getting a tax receipt for anything is a matter of finding a charity who wants your books, and values them enough to give you a receipt for them. That's going to depend on the books. If they are valuable antiques then you will have no problem, but then you would also have ...


4

Tax is often calculated per item. Especially in the days of the internet, some items are taxable and some aren't, depending on the item and your nexus. I would recommend calculating and storing tax with each item, to account for these subtle differences. EDIT: Not sure why this was downvoted, if you don't believe me, you can always check with Amazon: ...


4

My understanding it that the signature requirement is at the retailer's discretion. If the merchant decides to require a signature it protects them against fraudulent charge-back claims, but increases their administrative costs. In some situations it just isn't practical for a retailer to require a signature. Consider for example mail-order or online ...


4

POS stands for Point of Sale (like a specific store location) which indicates that the purchase occurred by using your debit card, but it can also be the on-line transaction done via 3-D Secure. Checking with bank, they said that Kirchstrasse transaction could be related to direct marketing subscription service ordered on-line. Investigating further what I'...


4

In my experience, even with such POS machines, there is a display that asks you to confirm your total, as a very last step, even if they ask if you want a receipt as a first step. By this manner, it would be nearly impossible for the teller to change the total without you noticing, so long as you read the total given to you by the device. The scam in ...


4

Ideally you would keep both the bill and payment receipt, so you can prove that those payments were for eligible expenses. Practically though, I believe a payment receipt by itself that shows a medical office or hospital as the payee should suffice. (Note IMHO the bill by itself without a payment receipt may not suffice.) The IRS does dictate recordkeeping ...


3

No, as a director normally you can't. As a director of a Limited company, all those payments should be accounted for as directors' remuneration and have been subject to PAYE and NIC, even if you are self-employed. Currently there is no legislation which prevents a director from receiving self-employment income from a company in which he is a director, ...


3

Sure you can. Obviously it means your company will make less profit, saving you 20% corporation tax, while your personal income will be higher, meaning you will likely spend more than 20% in income tax and National Insurance contributions.


3

In some stores that is done. When I shop at the Apple store or at the Farmers market the receipt is automatically sent to my email address. Why don't others do it? If the target of the itemized receipt is a credit card company they would be sending data that they spent collecting to another corporation. The grocery store is collecting your data so they can ...


3

You might check with your government's unclaimed property registry. In the US this is handled by state governments.


3

You seem overly fixated on dead tree documentation of purchases. They are deducting this from your account monthly - the mere fact that the money was taken is enough to prove in court that they have you on their books and to hold them to paying out said insurance. The email copies is actually a better way to organize receipts in most cases (can't be ...


3

Taxes should not be calculated at the item level. Taxes should be aggregated by tax group at the summary level. The right way everywhere is LINE ITEMS ITEM 1: $1.00 (taxable) ITEM 2: $1.00 (taxable) ITEM 3: $1.00 (taxable) SUMMARY Total of taxable items for this tax rate: $3.00 Your tax amount, rounded half up: .37 Your total: 3.37 PS:If you'd charge ...


3

Also, depending on the state, they may have or permit specific rules for rounding which are other than strictly mathematical, such as tax tables, which change at arbitrarily chosen pennies, not necessarily the mathematically correct ones. ** That may be to break this very logjam for shops which include the tax in the price to simplify bill handling for ...


3

There is basically no chance that you'll be able to get an invoice from a normal retail store in the United States. You can get a receipt as you are doing today. Invoices would generally only be used if the corporation is paying the bill after the goods are delivered. If you really want an invoice, you'd need to go somewhere that does business to business ...


2

I think it's interesting that the other answers here all focus on the possibility of a software glitch or other unintentional error in the ATM behaviour. Personally, I keep ATM receipts so that if I spot a withdrawal I don't recognise, it sways it in favour of being fraud (as opposed to memory failure) if I also don't have a receipt for it. I also always ...


2

First of all to answer the basic question "Is one method correct? Might it depend on local laws?" Yes it does depend on local laws. Because ultimately the business will have to file forms with the sate/county/city. These forms are going to ask for the total sales based on the tax category (tax free, x%, y%). Each transaction could have parts that fall into ...


2

You should total the items first, to get $3.00, then add the tax, then round up/down accordingly. Your two examples above don't offer this option, even though your second example arrives at the same result. In your first example, a number of items taxed one at a time might result in many .006 results which would round to .01. A long enough list of items ...


2

Credit card statement is questionable. It may not fly during audit since from the statement you cannot learn what the purchase was for and what items were included. When small amounts involved and the nature of the expense is clear (e.g.: you're claiming a meal expense and you have a credit card statement showing "Starbucks") it will probably be fine. But if ...


2

The answer to your question will depend on the purpose. You say: The reasons might be for auditing, reconciling with source documents, tax or management purposes. If you are tracking for tax purposes, the US IRS says that donations mailed on 12/31 count for the current year. In that case, you'll want to record the date the payment was made or sent to ...


2

Whether or not you or the other person has a receipt, all transactions can be disputed up until 90 days. If the other person decides to create a dispute and escalate it, paypal will take matters into their own hands and create an investigation. Now, it is up to paypal to decide if you get to keep the funds or if it goes back to the other person.


2

According to PayPal, if he or she used a credit or debit card, then yes.


2

As Ben Miller notes in comments, one thing you can do is track the food in an app on your phone that tracks what you eat. There are several. That's best if you're looking to pay attention to calories. Another thing you can do is buy a receipt scanner app. You don't need to save the receipt and take it home; just take a pic right there and upload that to ...


2

Yes you want a receipt. Imagine the scenario that next month you don't send in the payment, because you already gave it to them. Then they send you a bill for the late fee. Now you call them up and ask what happened. Their response would be "what check?" Or they start the procedure to evict you... Or their bank might decide to cash the checks despite the ...


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