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1

No. No need. This is simply you buying the house at a lower price because it is worth less. It is worth less because it has an intractable tenant that you cannot remove for 1-3 years, and cannot collect rent from, because of a previous landlord-tenant commitment that comes bundled with the property. It would be exactly the same as if I owned a real ...


2

I don't think so, but I would check with an accountant to make sure. You will probably also want to consult with an attorney to draw up a proper lease. Some may say that this is totally avoiding taxes, but it isn't. When you go to sell the property, your cost basis will be less and therefore you will potentially have to pay more taxes then if you had ...


4

This depends on the taxation laws, but generally: If you have invented a trick to avoid taxes, it may be considered inappropriate by the tax authorities. Where I live, this goes as far as this: if you sell a stock and immediately buy it back to optimize your taxation, they won't accept it. Even still, taxation is typically applied to all gains: income and ...


2

Past returns are past, future returns are future. I have no experience in Indian real estate market, but I should mention that any CAGR should take into account inflation. Stocks yield about 6% above inflation. If inflation has been on average at 14-24%, that explains the origin of the high CAGR in real estate. Also, how much time has your father spent in ...


2

WeWork has a residential brand, WeLive, that does not own it's buildings. I guess we'll find out if this is a business model that can grow into single family homes. The New York-based startup does not own any of its WeWork or WeLive properties, but rather leases floors and buildings from landlords, improves the spaces, and then rents them back out. ...


15

The case referred to is an English case. At that time in the UK, “rates” was the name for the general property tax that had to be paid to the local council on every domestic property. If it was rented, the rental agreement would specify whether the landlord or the tenant was responsible for paying the rates. Domestic rates were replaced by Council Tax in the ...


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