3

It may exist but I do not know of any web sites that provide the one, five and ten year return for any stock of your choosing. You can create a spreadsheet that does this but you'd have to capture historical data as well as the dividend dates and amounts and that would be quite onerous. In lieu of the above, I think that the best approach would be a DRIP ...


2

Just MHO (which should be a comment, but is too long, so I made it a Community Wiki) but a beginner should not invest in individual stocks. Mutual funds and ETFs (essentially mutual funds that act like stocks) give you greater diversity, and they display the 10 year growth, which includes dividends, and takes into account pesky things like stock splits. ...


1

The sum of the discounted cash flows (NPVs) should equal zero. For example, you deposit £100 today (NPV) and expect to receive £110 next year. Discount £110 to NPV and sum the cash flows. 100 - 110/(1 + x) = 0 ∴ x = 10 %


1

Whenever you are computing volatility in Excel or using any other formula/tool that utilizes past historical data of stock price, you are always calculating the historical volatility. To compute implied volatility, there is no explicit formula. In such cases we usually use a numerical method. In Excel whenever we use goal seek to minimize the difference ...


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