40

It costs you $584.9 x 100 = $58,490 to buy the put option. You would instantly make $80,000 - $22500 - $58,490 = -$990


26

Short sales have a lower direct cost (i.e., the price of the put option), and so also a higher potential profit, but a much higher risk. Unhedged short sales are incredibly risky, of course, but they're typically hedged in one fashion or another. Put options are fairly expensive, so they won't necessarily be profitable unless the stock depreciates ...


23

A person with an opinion such as yours might sell these options because they think that there's a high probability that such options will expire. Why would someone buy them? The options could be undervalued and a buyer could be attempting to take advantage of that (standalone or combined with other options in a more complex strategy). Cheap long OTM ...


20

This is maybe kind of stupid, but it's a mnemonic device that worked OK for me to get the hang of these two varieties of option. It may only work for American English in my particular region, so if it doesn't immediately help it might be better to abandon: You might call someone up, and you might put someone down. These are idiomatic in the English I've ...


15

They might be buying it as a kind of insurance for index trackers they own; they're guaranteed that they don't lose more than 28% of their investment (until June 11th) for only a small price; even if the market falls by, say, 40%, the options will (partially) compensate for the loss.


15

If I buy a put option (which would be an option to sell stocks as far as I understood), who will provide the stocks to sell if I decide to exercise it? Should I have/provide the stocks or is it the option writer who provides them? And at what price would they be provided? A put gives the owner the right to sell the stock at the strike price. If you ...


14

In the early 90's, the SEC issued a ruling that allowed companies to sell puts on their stock for the purpose of buybacks. The short puts don't necessarily assure the company that they will acquire shares because if share price rises, the puts will expire worthless, generating some income, and the buyback isn't accomplished. OTOH, if share price falls, ...


12

No. In good years, the income seems free. In a down year, particularly a bad one, the investor will be subject to large losses that will prove the strategy a bad one. On the other hand, one often hears of the strategy of selling puts on stock you would like to own. If the stock rises, you keep the premium, if it drops, you own it at a bit of a discount ...


11

The owner of a call has the right to buy the underlying at the strike price any time before expiration. The seller of that call has the obligation to sell the underlying at the strike price if an owner exercises the call (the seller is assigned). The owner of a put has the right to sell the underlying at the strike price any time before expiration. The ...


10

Here is a quick and dirty explanation of options. In a nutshell, you pay a certain amount to buy a contract that gives you the right, but not the obligation, to buy or sell a stock at a predetermined price at some date in the future. They come in a few flavors: Call Option - You can buy a stock at a predetermined price (higher than the current price) ...


10

Options have legitimate uses as a way of hedging a bet, but in the hands of anyone but an expert they're gambling, not investing. They are EXTREMELY volatile compared to normal stocks, and are one of the best ways to lose your shirt in the stock market yet invented. How options actually work is that you're negotiating a promise that, at some future date or ...


10

In theory, no. In practise, occasionally. In theory if the market is working correctly the price of a matched put and call in the same stock should align such that there is no profit in buying both. The same goes for any other set of options which are trying to cover all possible outcomes (or indeed for trying to bet on all the runners in a horse race!). ...


9

Many web sites state that "90% of options expire worthless." That is categorically FALSE. The majority of options do not expire worthless. As per stats provided by the CBOE: 1) About 10% of options are exercised (gain or loss) 2) About 60% are closed before expiration 3) About 30% expire worthless 90% of options go unexercised which is very different ...


9

Not really answering your question, but I think it's better just to remember the existing words that are used. PUT option I have a stock, I have the option to put it back on the market. Like I would put the milk in the fridge. CALL option I don't have a stock, but I have the option to call one to me. Like I would call a dog to me.


8

Standard options are contracts for 100 shares. If the option is for $0.75/share and you are buying the contract for 100 shares the price would be $75 plus commission. Some brokers have mini options available which is a contract for 10 shares. I don't know if all brokers offer this option and it is not available on all stocks. The difference between the 1 ...


8

Your friend's advice is good advice. You should never be over confident in the financial markets regardless of your investment/trading skills and experience. Yes, you can make a lot of money in a bear market via put buying and/or the shorting stocks and ETFs. But rookies are not likely to do so - unless they get lucky - because they lack the risk ...


7

Your price for the put is unrealistic. If the stock is at $18, and the put has a strike of $19, then the put is worth at least $1, since otherwise one could buy the put and the underlying stock, and immediately exercise the put (assuming it is American, as is usual for stocks), to get a guaranteed profit. This is called "arbitrage". Any such opportunities ...


7

This is a really bad idea. You are asking to be forced to pay for something at a time when you most likely NOT want to buy it. Why? There is no stability (much less any degree of predictability) to give up the right to control when and for how much you would be willing to own the S&P500. Just don't do it....."generate stable income" and "selling puts" is ...


7

Yes, it's completely normal to buy (and sell) puts and other options without holding the underlying. However, every (US) brokerage I know of only permits this within a margin account. I don't know why...probably a legal reason. You don't actually have to use the margin in a margin account. If you want to trade options, though, you will need a margin ...


6

Yes, the potential loss for a short seller of stock is almost unbounded but no stock has ever gone to infinity. Anyone with any experience with shorting would practice disciplined risk management should a short position move against him. Yes, a gap can hurt but no trader with a lick of sense doesn't cut losses. As for long puts versus short stock, ...


6

You can, but it is easier just to throw your money away. The process you describe can never result in profit, as the option is priced according to the underlying security and the risk. Of course, something relevant can happen 3 milliseconds after you successfully buy the option, and there is a profit (or loss) possible. But even then, selling the option ...


5

The question is, how do I exit? I can't really sell the puts because there isn't enough open interest in them now that they are so far out of the money. I have about $150K of funds outside of this position that I could use, but I'm confused by the rules of exercising a put. Do I have to start shorting the stock? You certainly don't want to give ...


5

So, yes, you may be having the inevitable epiphany where you realize that options can synthetically replicate the same risk profile of owning stock outright. Allowing you to manipulate risk and circumvent margin requirement differences amongst asset classes. Naked short puts are analogous to a covered call, but may have different (lesser) margin ...


5

In the money puts and calls are subject to automatic execution at expiration. Each broker has its own rules and process for this. For example, I am long a put. The strike is $100. The stock trades at the close, that final friday for $90. I am out to lunch that day. Figuratively, of course. I wake up Saturday and am short 100 shares. I can only be short in ...


5

Whether or not you make money here depends on whether you are buying or selling the option when you open your position. You certainly would not make money in the scenario where you are buying options at the open. If fact you would end up losing quite a lot of money. You do not specify whether you are buying or selling the options, so let's assume that you ...


5

I'm not sure what your question is. If your bet happens to be the same way the market goes, you'll make money. If you buy stocks, you're betting they'll go up. So if they go up, you'll make money. If you sell them short, or you buy puts, then if they go down, you'll make money. It's like saying that if the roulette wheel comes up black, then it's easy to ...


5

A long put gives you the right to sell the stock at the strike price. The 2/05 '21 $800 put costs $584.90. You have the ability to sell the stock for $800 and based on your quoted price of $225, the counterparty agrees to overpay you $575 if assigned. That is called the intrinsic value of your put option. Since your put costs $584.90, you are also paying $...


4

Check the rules with your broker. Usually if it expires in the money, the broker would exercise it. But you need to check with your broker about their rules on the matter.


4

If you are planning to hedge your stocks by buying, say, a put on the SPY, it's an expensive way to go. SPY is 208 right now, and the Jan16 (five months out) put is $8.20 or 4% of the value. i.e. you'd need more than a 4% drop to just break even. If you fear a 20% sized crash, 40 points or so, a $190 strike is at $3.37. And at SPY $168, you'd have $22 in ...


4

An index annuity is almost the same as Indexed Universal Life, except the equity-index annuity is an investment with a guaranteed minimum return, with sometimes a higher return that is a function of the gain in the stock market, but is not associated with a life insurance policy. After a time, you can convert the EIA to a lifetime income (the annuity part) ...


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