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Buying shares of stock (whether common stock or preferred stock) just before the ex-dividend date (but after the dividend has been announced) is called buying the dividend because the market price of the stock increases by the amount of the dividend (and no, this increase is not because of government regulations or stock exchange rules or any such thing, it ...


10

If you buy a preferred stock before the ex-dividend date and you own it on the ex-dividend date then you'll get the dividend. You could own the stock for as little as one day before being entitled to the dividend. With new issues, if it pays a quarterly dividend then the first dividend may be less since the accrual period is less than 3 months.


4

If the market price is $6 then that is what you would pay for it. And yes, if it was past the call date and the company called the issue, they would pay $25. But why would they pay $25 for something that is only worth $6? Not likely to happen. While the dividend may be cumulative, it can be suspended. What they owe you accrues but there's no guarantee ...


3

Nomenclature for preferred stock symbols isn't standardized. Brokers and web sites use a variety of suffixes for non standard symbols. Read this answer for details. In your list, the lower case "p" means that it is a preferred stock. As for the meaning of the terms that you listed, Quantum Online is an excellent source for preferred stock ...


3

They are not the same. "Class A" is a class of common stock. Bob mentioned a few differences specific to Class A - here are some others: Preferred shares are paid off before common shares in the event of a bankruptcy or liquidation. Preferred shares pay a required, fixed dividend; dividends on common shares are optional and can fluctuate. ...


2

Converting to shares has the same effect as a secondary offering. It dilutes ownership of existing shareholders, decreasing their percentage of ownership when the new shares hit the market.


2

Preferred stocks are income securities that pay an annual dividend (usually quarterly but sometimes monthly or semi-annually) unless they are fixed/floating issues. Most are issued at $25. Most have no maturity date but they are callable at the issue price five years after the date of issue hence they 'don't grow' unless it's a convertible preferred. GOOG ...


1

In your comment, you mentioned that the preferred stock in question is ALIN-A (Altera Infrastructure L.P., 7.25% Series A Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Units). According to the prospectus, the company will pay $25 per unit when it decides to call the issue. The problem is that the company is not likely to call the preferred stock anytime soon. Here are ...


1

Class A shares can be structured in a variety of ways by the company. Traditional Class A shares are not sold to the public can't be sold, and have more voting rights. Preferred shares do not have voting rights.


1

Valuation of a preferred share could be about as complicated as determining FMV in the first place. Primarily, this is because 'preferred shares' can mean many different attributes, such as the ability to convert to common shares at some ratio, dividend considerations, voting considerations, etc. There is no way to derive the value of a preferred share ...


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