65

The norm for disposing of old checks is destroying them, if you really wanted a non-shredder option you could cut a significant portion off and just burn those, or dispose of larger pieces at separate times/locations. However, with a name change you can typically just keep using them. Sign your new name. The name/address portion at the top is mostly a ...


45

Use them to make papier mache. Place them in a bucket of water, let them sit for a while, stirring/mashing occasionally, until they become a pulp. Then either discard the mess, or use it creatively: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papier-m%C3%A2ch%C3%A9


37

Why on earth did you only consider burning them inside your apartment? Go outside and find somewhere without many people. Could be a park, side of the road somewhere, even an alleyway if you can't easily get out of the city. (Improved idea from Geobits: if you're worried about lighting a fire just anywhere, or if there are local rules about it, many parks ...


33

Simple: Use a secure shredding vendor. Some vendors offer different tiers with different disposal practices, for checks you would obviously want to choose the more (most) secure option. Many office supply vendor chains offer secure shredding services - UPS Store, Office Depot, PostNet, and so on. Googling for your local branches should give you an idea of ...


23

In the US, Section 3.114 of the Uniform Commercial Code sets the rules for how any confusion in checks or other business transactions is handled: “If an instrument contains contradictory terms, typewritten terms prevail over printed terms, handwritten terms prevail over both, and words prevail over numbers.” If there was any ambiguity in the way you ...


21

At least in the UK (but I suspect also in the US), many offices use secure collections bins (see below) to dispose of confidential papers that are no longer needed. These are collected periodically by a service company and securely shredded (often essentially on-premises using a mobile shredder). The ones I've seen would be able to handle an unseparated ...


19

Take them to the bank branch, ask them to destroy the cheques for you.


19

A check is still valid if the address is wrong or missing. On those rare occasions where I write a check, I'm still using the checks that I had when I opened my account half a dozen addresses ago. No one has ever had a problem cashing a check (and I don't bother crossing out the incorrect information). It is possible if you're still using a personal ...


10

That seemed like a security issue to me. Technically, you are correct: having your bank routing number and account number on checks is a security risk. Am I being too paranoid Not paranoid, but (young and) inexperienced. People and companies write billions and billions and billions of checks every year. And how much check fraud is there? A lot less ...


9

Many neighborhoods/towns have a "shred day", "secure destruction day", or something similar where industrial-grade devices are made available to the public. Usually you'll go to the town hall or somewhere similar and there will be massive shredders or incendiary devices at your disposal to get rid of large volumes of sensitive documents. See if there's ...


8

An ATM deposit, and since most ATMs will not scan or OCR the check, is subject to verification with regards to the date, amount, payee name and proper endorsements. However, most banks -at their option- may either reject or negotiate a post dated check as if it has the current/past date on it. Since most "post dated" checks are written due to the account ...


8

You are overestimating the task of tearing up several thousand checks, and also overestimating the persistence of scavengers pawing through your garbage in search of treasure. I faced the same problem when I had about 300 checks left over when I retitled more than several accounts. It really didn't take that long to tear them in fours and put them in with ...


8

A teller may have a limit on how many checks that he or she can process, but an entire bank can get thousands of checks per day from businesses that make daily deposits. There may also be a limit on personal accounts; you may need to set up a business account that includes check processing (probably not for free). I would to what they say - talk to the ...


7

Bank policies vary from bank to bank. Legally speaking, as a general rule identification is not required to make a deposit. Banks are charged with protecting your privacy and your assets. Making a deposit does not require the bank to disclose anything and therefore does not jeopardize either your privacy or assets. I once made a deposit into my own account....


6

Lets say you owed me $123.00 an wanted to mail me a check. I would then take the check from my mailbox an either take it to my bank, or scan it and deposit it via their electronic interface. Prior to you mailing it you would have no idea which bank I would use, or what my account number is. In fact I could have multiple bank accounts, so I could decide ...


6

The bank branch I occasionally visit has a secure disposal bin with a slot big enough to take chequebooks. This is freely available to customers, next to the ATMs/paying in machines inside the branch. While your bank may be online only, they may be part of a larger bank that isn't (several online banks in the UK work this way). As a First Direct customer, ...


5

I was going to start with a comment, but this turned into an answer. This is also a US based answer. In the united states the most important information on a blank check are the routing number and the account number. A few years ago my credit union main office moved across the river into the neighboring state. The name of the credit union didn't change, ...


5

There are certain standards that modern checks need to meet. These aren't required by law, but banks today generally insist on them. If you are able to meet these standards and print your own checks at home, you are allowed to do so. One way this is commonly done is with purchased check blanks and check printing software. Office supply stores sell check ...


5

To answer length validity and security implications of draft checks issued and negotiated within the United States, I am heavily addressing the common erroneous assumptions of where the funds sit while they're "in" a draft check and how to get them out. Tl;Dr The existing answers are incomplete and in some ways dangerously misleading. Jerry can still be ...


5

You can sign over the check, of course. However, you'll probably need to deal with 1099 issued to you personally instead of the corporation later on. You'll have to add it to your tax return as income and negative income on the same line (line 21 of your 1040) and attach a statement explaining that the income was erroneously reported to you and will be ...


5

Is there a mechanical workshop close by? One person with an oxyacetylene torch will make a burn through within seconds. Then just dump them regularly. Bring some donuts for the mechanics, ask them nicely, should get done within half a minute.


5

You can't really, it's the bank's job to do that. That's the whole point of writing a name on the For line. Banks aren't supposed to accept checks endorsed by someone other than that person. When you get your canceled check images (or the actual checks if your bank still does that), you should be checking that that the depositor is who you wrote the check to....


5

In USA, on Check you cannot write "To the payee only" as in Israel or "account Payee only" as in India. In USA it is assumed that the Bank will verify that the name matches with the person cashing the check. I understand that basically you want that check to go to an account rather than being cashed, I don't think that can be limited by writer. So if you ...


4

Your present situation aside, checks do present a risk any time you present them. I would never write a check other than to a legitimate business or other person that I trusted. The routing number and your account number are both on the check, and that is all that is needed to pull funds - you can even do this yourself, no check needed, by giving these ...


4

I have been an attorney for 30 years, and we learned this in class. It is valid to write a check without words, but if someone alters the check, the bank is off the hook because you in essence helped the scammer. Always think about who you're writing the check to. For example, the phone or electric company isn't going to alter the numbers to get more money, ...


4

Ignore it. Having both a numeric and a written-out representation of the amount simply serves to confirm that the amount is correct, and to prevent tampering (e.g. recipient adds an extra 0 to the numeric amount, but the written amount says "One hundred" rather than "One thousand"). As long as it's clear what you meant it should be accepted.


4

What you are asking here could also be put on Stack Overflow because it is as much a computer science question as a finance one. Banks have many ways to protect from checks being used twice including machine learning programs to hopefully identify if the same check is being used twice; however, it does happen that they can be used more than once. One: The ...


3

A bank check is drawn on the bank itself. You gave the bank the funds backing that check at the time you purchased it. You can not get that money back except by returning the check to them. So, yes, effectively that check behaves like cash; the money us already gone from your account, and once you hand it over you can't claim it was forged or otherwise try ...


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