8

Your bank doesn't care about your immigration status, it cares about your tax status. You're a US tax resident and will open a US-resident account, not an international account (regardless of where the money comes from).


6

As a relatively recent nonimmigrant visa holder (O1), I was able to open an ETrade brokerage account without problems. I have full tax residence in the USA so have an SSN, and a credit history so it was no problem. Later, as a greencard holder, I opened IRA accounts with them, too. Again, there were no issues as I had all the information that the IRS ...


6

While I agree with keshlam@ that the gym had no reason (or right) to ask for your SSN, giving false SSN to obtain credit or services (including gym membership) may be considered a crime. While courts disagree on whether you can be charged with identity theft in this scenario, you may very well be charged with fraud, and if State lines are crossed (which in ...


4

DV/IR visas, when stamped by the immigration officer at the port of your arrival (the airport where you went through the immigration) become your official green card. That is why they're stamped as I-551 - they are I-551 (the official document certifying to your status of a permanent resident alien). Stamped visa is as good as the physical green card for 1 ...


3

J-1s who are not students are considered teachers or trainees, who are exempt individuals (exempt from the Substantial Presence Test) during the time on J-1 unless they have been exempt individuals for some part of 2 of the past 6 calendar years. Your wife would be an exempt individual on her time on J-1 in 2015 and 2017, but not 2018 (since she was already ...


3

Your SSN is yours for life. Provided you have an SSN or an ITIN (i.e. something to ID you to the IRS), Wells Fargo won't give a fig about your immigration status.


3

None. If you have been granted permanent residence you are eligible. See the Federal Student Aid site, including the details under the eligible non-citizen section which details the visa types. This is echoed on the FAFSA site itself - if you have the 8 or 9 digit number to complete the form, you are eligible. You must speak with your school's financial aid ...


3

You will need to file your tax return (form 1040) with the form 2555/2555-EZ attached to it. Usually, retail tax preparation services, especially on-line websites, are not tailored for such a unique need and people working there are likely not train to understand what it is that you're talking about. If you're up to doing the research yourself you can use ...


2

You file 1040 as a US resident for the whole year, if you had a green card any time during that year. This is called "the Green Card test" for residency. That means that regardless of where you live, you file as US tax resident, and pay taxes on your worldwide income. It also means you're required to file the FBAR and FATCA forms and other forms and taxes ...


2

Permanent residents of the U.S. follow the same rules that apply to U.S. citizens for tax purposes. Total duration of stay in the U.S. in 2013, and the fact that for part of the year you did not have permanent resident status, might affect how some non-U.S. income and non-U.S. taxation is treated on your 2013 income tax return, but you will need to file a ...


2

If you were a resident for tax purposes before getting the green card (being on H1 or L1, for example, makes you "US Person" for tax purposes) - you should have been reporting then too. Definition of "US Person" for the purposes of FBAR comes from 26 USC § 7701 (i.e.: the definitions' section of the US tax code). I'd say file it if in doubt. The penalties ...


2

Your net income from the rental property will effectively be taxed as additional regular income, with two important points: You can claim expenses from, for example, mortgage interest (but not the mortgage principal payments), or repairs & maintenance, etc. - this will reduce your net rental income If you pay foreign taxes in your home country (you will ...


2

Let's ask the IRS: Alien Residency - Green Card Test You are a resident, for U.S. federal tax purposes, if you are a Lawful Permanent Resident of the United States at any time during the calendar year. This is known as the "green card" test. You are a Lawful Permanent Resident of the United States, at any time, if you have been given the ...


1

Your understanding is not completely correct. Property acquired during the course of the marriage is community property regardless of who is the owner of the account but property that belonged to you before the marriage is your personal property. So, the question is whether you established the brokerage account in your name only using property that you owned ...


1

As a permanent resident in the U.S. but not a citizen, I was told by a representative at Scottrade that I am not allowed to open a brokerage account.


1

Reading through the super rules, it looks to me like you would need to reach retirement age (65) and then you'd have access to your Super even if you're not formally retired in Australia. Here: https://www.ato.gov.au/Individuals/Super/Accessing-your-super/ It says: You can access your super: when you turn 65 (even if you haven’t retired), or ...


1

No, you should certify your correct tax status when you open a bank account. I have never been asked to provide any proof of address, and I've opened several bank accounts. What you need to do is probably to shop around and consider opening in person in the branch and not online.


1

my tax liabilities in India on my stock profit in US You would need to pay tax on the profit in India as well after you have become resident Indian. India and US have a double tax avoidance treaty. Hence if you have already paid tax in US, you can claim benefit and pay balance if any. For example if you US tax liability is 20 USD and Indian liability is ...


1

Once you get a green card, you automatically become a U.S. tax resident and you must declare your entire income to the U.S. government. You may have heard that the number of days you spend in the United States each year has some effect on whether or not you are a tax resident. But this is true only for people who have nonimmigrant visas.. It is not true for ...


1

I looked into it. It would appear that if you're a permanent resident any time of the year - you're considered resident for tax purposes for that time. That would mean that you're required to file FBAR for the year if you're a permanent resident any time of the year, even if it is one single day. I do not have a definitive answer for your second part of the ...


1

Staying out of India for a certain duration on a year (financial year) deems one to be considered NRI (non-resident Indian). NRIs are not taxed under Indian tax law as they are deemed subject to the resident country tax laws, so for NRI there is no tax liability in India. For your specific case, you could consult a Charted Accountant (CA) and he/she will be ...


1

Another factor here--foreign bank accounts could cause you to need to file. IIRC it's $10k in assets but I wouldn't trust my memory on this.


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