Hot answers tagged

15

This is clearly a scam, and you should stay away from it. Anyone reading this knew that from the title alone - and it seems that you know it too. Don't "test" whether something is a scam by putting your own money in it. That is exactly how these scammers make money, and how you lose it. How their scam works is irrelevant. The simple fact is that there is no ...


14

But how I can prove; to this person; that I know he's trying to scam me for money. Any reason you want to prove something to scammer? Any proof you throw at him, he will be able to come up with some other story / excuse. This may end up in you believing him more. There is obviously no advantage. Best is to stop communication with the scammer. This will be ...


8

Whether or not you have money in your account will not necessarily stop them withdrawing the money, and it certainly won't stop them attempting to withdraw the money. There are two possible scenarios when they attempt to withdraw the money (as they surely will): The bank refuses the withdrawal: you still owe them the money, you may also owe additional late ...


6

In simple terms, it is a business operation when it becomes a profit-making enterprise. It is a grey area, but there is a difference between selling occasional personal items on eBay and selling for profit. I would imagine the sort of considerations HM Revenue & Customs would take into account are the size of your turnover, the extent to ...


6

You need to talk to your bank. If you're unable to contact your bank until Monday, then wait until Monday. Don't fixate on the idea that the transaction may "hard post" on Monday. If it happens, it happens, but it's not the end of the world. Even if the transaction posts, it's not the end of the world. If the retailer is legit, they will refund your ...


6

Debit Cards have a certain processing delay, "lag time", before the transaction from the vendor completes with your bank. In the US it's typically 3 business days but I have seen even a 15 day lag from Panera Bread. I guess in the UK, payment processors have similar processing delays. A business is not obliged to run its payment processing in realtime, as ...


5

Sounds like a Ponzi scheme, amplified by social media. Ponzi schemes always rely on some "winners" to say they are winners, so they can grow the pot. If you put in $100 and got out $120, that's the $20 the operator pays so that the next guy who puts in $100 gets back... zero.


4

Your bank does not reserve 30 USD since your account is held in Euros. Suppose that you are paying directly from your bank account for your on-line purchase, e.g. filling out the form for an electronic funds transfer from your bank account instead of the form for a charge to your credit card. At some later time, the merchant will request your bank to send ...


4

As others have commented, this is almost certainly a Ponzi scheme. What will happen is that they will report to you that you are earning fantastic returns. This will encourage you to pour more money into the scheme in the belief that you are making huge profits. The problems will start to occur when you ask for your money. You won't receive any money and ...


4

You don't need to prove that the other party will scam you. You can't, because they didn't scam you yet. But you don't have to prove anything. If you don't feel comfortable making business with someone, you can just say no. You are under no obligation to justify your decision to them. If someone wants to do business with you, then they need to prove to you ...


3

The three (or four) digit number on the back of your card is called a CVV (or a CVC). In theory, being able to provide it means you have access to the physical card, and thus presumably are an authorized user. No one involved with credit card processing (the merchant, their processor, their bank, etc) is allowed to store it, so as to enforce that meaning. ...


3

You could talk to your bank and ask them to increase your daily limit. Another option is to talk to the vendor that you are trying to pay, and see if they will let you pay part of the total each day for a few days.


3

A freelancer must be able to issue invoices. If he/she can't, he/she is not a freelancer. This requires them to register with the appropriate tax authorities (or set up a company), which is a process that varies from country to country. For people doing small amounts of work over the year, there are usually simplified procedures. In some countries, such as ...


3

Is Part-time online data-entry job a good way to earn extra income, It depends, but yes its a good way to earn extra income. And its not limited to data entry, some are social engineering ... every wonder why you see so many good review about green tea? or any such product. You get paid for every positive / authoritative review you write. the way I see ...


3

I think something you might want to look at is a service called Dwolla. They charge $0.25 per transaction, and are free for transactions under $10.


3

Look up SteamRep Middlemen. Message them via steam and ask if they can act as a middleman for your transaction. These people have been trusted with thousands of dollars multiple times and the community as a whole has trusted their services, but make sure you have the correct profile as they are very often impersonated. A typical transaction would play out ...


2

I believe its regular, as it does make economical sense. The transaction exchange rate is fixed when the transaction is posted, and I'm sure there's disclaimer telling you that when you're looking at pending transactions. The bank will only actually pay the money when the transaction is posted, based on the exchange rate at that time. If the exchange rate ...


2

Using the bitcoin network has no age restrictions. From my experience the merchant services for using the network natively are severely lacking, and payment processors that accept bitcoin, such as Stripe, Paypal, and Bitpay have much better merchant services, but then you still face the dilemma of using a payment processor. Also from my experience, people ...


2

The problem is, I don't understand, how such sites work. Is that scam or not? Some of my friends told me that they've actually received the revenue after they deposited a bit of money to similar sites, and I don't have any evidence not to trust them. Yes there are scam. Stay away. Quite likely people got real money back into Bank Account. Or more likely it ...


2

If you paid by credit card, file a dispute with the credit card company. They will credit you the money immediately while they investigate. The burden of proof will then be on the merchant. Keep your documents handy in case you need them: USPS receipt, proof of delivery, copies of all correspondance, etc. File the credit card chargeback now, because there ...


2

Safely? You exchange it for Steam wallet funds, and use them to buy games for your own account. (Or birthday gifts or whatnot.) There's no good way to get actual cash from a Steam item, only various flavors of shady. 3rd-party sites don't have a way to confirm that the item transfer actually went through, so most escrow techniques don't actually work. A ...


1

You bank Account always has a "native" currency. If it´s in INR all payments to that account in a any other currency are automatically exchanged to rupees by your bank. Usually fees apply and the conversion rate may not be the most favorable. It is possible to open accounts in other currencies. So you may choose to hold these currencies and exchange in a ...


1

You sell on a third party site which will outline the terms of use on their platform. For your interests, their terms of use and policies are effectively the law. Actual legal concerns on your end would be limited to the legalities of your product alone. You can always reach out to third party venues to see if their support will meet you somewhere in the ...


1

I'd imagine it is the same for an adult. The money probably gets withdrawn and that's it. However, if the scammer were to go to a branch in person, I'd imagine there would need to be some sort of photo identification to withdraw money. If it were online, then the scammer would also need the account holder's username and password. Either way, chances are ...


1

I'm not convinced this is completely possible without additional data. I'm categorizing my purchases now, and I keep running into things like "was this hardware store purchase for home repair, hobby tools and supplies, cookware, ..." Ditto for department stores, ditto for cash purchases which appear only as an ATM withdrawal. Sometimes I remember, ...


1

If you have income in the US, you will owe US income tax on it, unless there is a treaty with your country that says otherwise.


1

Here is a list of solutions I would use starting with the easiest: Check to see if your bank offers the ability to send money to someone's bank account by entering the recipient's checking account number and bank's routing number. If so get the recipient's account info from a voided check. USAA and Capital One 360 offer this feature and other may as well ...


1

There is nothing called best; Depending on the amounts there are several options and each will cost some money. If your business is still small customers are individuals try PayPal it will be easy for everyone. The other options are accepting Credit Card, you would need to set-up card gateway on your website etc Simple wire transfer, it will cost more ...


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