Hot answers tagged

111

This is scam. Companies do not offer jobs without qualifications. Plus asking you to pay by bitcoin is scam and can't be traced. Even bank transactions are difficult to recover. Don't transfer anything bitcoin or bank transactions or western union. Stop all communications before you give more information.


87

$200 to become $2500 in one week of trade This is a completely utopic return of investment. I would even call bullshit when someone would suggest a 10th of that in a year instead of a week. This is so ridiculous, it can only be a scam. If someone would have a secret to make that much money in such a short amount of time, they wouldn't waste their time going ...


60

Yes. Nobody sends movers to buy a mower. The check you receive will be fake, but the money you'll send back to the scammer will be very real, and out of your pocket.


53

Yes. This is a version of a widely used scam. Examples Basically, what's likely to happen is that you may receive a check, but there's a good chance that it'll be more than was agreed to, and you'll be asked to pay the shipper the balance. (Usually, the scammer is the shipper or with the shipper, surreptitiously). Eventually, the check will bounce, and ...


37

This is a classic advance-fee scam The old promise of "You'll have many, many dollars later if you give me a few dollars now". Most often seen as the Nigerian Prince/lottery scam, where you'll have $11.4 million if you pay a $300 bribe, oh wait, there'll also be a $600 filing fee, and - forgot to mention - the $1400 business license, and - we're getting ...


16

This is clearly a scam, and you should stay away from it. Anyone reading this knew that from the title alone - and it seems that you know it too. Don't "test" whether something is a scam by putting your own money in it. That is exactly how these scammers make money, and how you lose it. How their scam works is irrelevant. The simple fact is that there is no ...


16

Yes, it's an extremely common scam. It's most likely a generated message from an automated system that churns through Craigslist ads, sending the same generic email for each one. Note that there is no mention of the item or the price or anything else that would suggest this "person" even read the ad. These scams are unavoidable on Craigslist. One thing ...


14

But how I can prove; to this person; that I know he's trying to scam me for money. Any reason you want to prove something to scammer? Any proof you throw at him, he will be able to come up with some other story / excuse. This may end up in you believing him more. There is obviously no advantage. Best is to stop communication with the scammer. This will be ...


14

There are lots of red flags indicating that this website does not belong to a legitimate company. A big red flag is the wildly unrealistic returns that they promise: 10% per calendar day. Without reinvestment, this would come out to 3,650%, which is already completely ridiculous. With reinvestment, they're promising that your investment will earn 128,330,...


12

My folks almost got hit with such a scam. They were trying to sell an old classic car engine or transmission on craigslist. I remember it being something big bulky and heavy. They had some phone exchange with the out of state buyer who rapid shipped some actual UPS label to have a freight delivery operator come and pick up the unit. They also shipped in the ...


10

It is a scam. 99.9999% a scam. If you were paid for buying these gift cards, for example with a cheque paid into your account, expect the money to disappear from your account quite quickly, and nobody will be willing to cover your losses. If they told you why they want you to open a bank account, it would still be a scam, because their reasons would be lie. ...


9

Craigslist mailing, check, and/or shipping Scam It's as simple as that. Craigslist is ONLY for face-to-face, cash-on-the-barrelhead transactions. As soon as "mail", "check" or "ship" comes up, block the "buyer". It is a scam. Of course, your guy dinged all 3 bells. If someone wants to do that type of transaction, ...


8

Whether or not you have money in your account will not necessarily stop them withdrawing the money, and it certainly won't stop them attempting to withdraw the money. There are two possible scenarios when they attempt to withdraw the money (as they surely will): The bank refuses the withdrawal: you still owe them the money, you may also owe additional late ...


8

Let's break this down: who I then gave access to my online banking Check the terms of use you agreed to when you signed up for online banking. They universally contain language saying "don't give your username and password to anyone, for any reason." If someone wants to give you money, there are many safe methods to do so. There is, quite literally, no ...


7

Sounds like a Ponzi scheme, amplified by social media. Ponzi schemes always rely on some "winners" to say they are winners, so they can grow the pot. If you put in $100 and got out $120, that's the $20 the operator pays so that the next guy who puts in $100 gets back... zero.


6

In simple terms, it is a business operation when it becomes a profit-making enterprise. It is a grey area, but there is a difference between selling occasional personal items on eBay and selling for profit. I would imagine the sort of considerations HM Revenue & Customs would take into account are the size of your turnover, the extent to ...


6

You need to talk to your bank. If you're unable to contact your bank until Monday, then wait until Monday. Don't fixate on the idea that the transaction may "hard post" on Monday. If it happens, it happens, but it's not the end of the world. Even if the transaction posts, it's not the end of the world. If the retailer is legit, they will refund your ...


5

I was marketed by a lady online on some investment packages in bitcoin. ($200 to become $2500 in one week of trade). I indicated interest in this one above. She took me to a trading website to sign up. This makes no sense. If you don't know how to trade, how does this help you? If you do know how to trade, what do you need her website for? Also, what does "...


4

As others have commented, this is almost certainly a Ponzi scheme. What will happen is that they will report to you that you are earning fantastic returns. This will encourage you to pour more money into the scheme in the belief that you are making huge profits. The problems will start to occur when you ask for your money. You won't receive any money and ...


4

You don't need to prove that the other party will scam you. You can't, because they didn't scam you yet. But you don't have to prove anything. If you don't feel comfortable making business with someone, you can just say no. You are under no obligation to justify your decision to them. If someone wants to do business with you, then they need to prove to you ...


4

Unfortunately, none of us can know for certain that this offer is a scam. However, it clearly seems out of bounds and it's a good thing to be cautious whenever you feel nervous about a transaction. Considering that you have another offer that is acceptable, it's probably wise to take that offer. But, here are some guidelines to help avoid being scammed on ...


3

The three (or four) digit number on the back of your card is called a CVV (or a CVC). In theory, being able to provide it means you have access to the physical card, and thus presumably are an authorized user. No one involved with credit card processing (the merchant, their processor, their bank, etc) is allowed to store it, so as to enforce that meaning. ...


3

A freelancer must be able to issue invoices. If he/she can't, he/she is not a freelancer. This requires them to register with the appropriate tax authorities (or set up a company), which is a process that varies from country to country. For people doing small amounts of work over the year, there are usually simplified procedures. In some countries, such as ...


3

Is Part-time online data-entry job a good way to earn extra income, It depends, but yes its a good way to earn extra income. And its not limited to data entry, some are social engineering ... every wonder why you see so many good review about green tea? or any such product. You get paid for every positive / authoritative review you write. the way I see ...


3

You could talk to your bank and ask them to increase your daily limit. Another option is to talk to the vendor that you are trying to pay, and see if they will let you pay part of the total each day for a few days.


2

Using the bitcoin network has no age restrictions. From my experience the merchant services for using the network natively are severely lacking, and payment processors that accept bitcoin, such as Stripe, Paypal, and Bitpay have much better merchant services, but then you still face the dilemma of using a payment processor. Also from my experience, people ...


2

The problem is, I don't understand, how such sites work. Is that scam or not? Some of my friends told me that they've actually received the revenue after they deposited a bit of money to similar sites, and I don't have any evidence not to trust them. Yes there are scam. Stay away. Quite likely people got real money back into Bank Account. Or more likely it ...


2

If you paid by credit card, file a dispute with the credit card company. They will credit you the money immediately while they investigate. The burden of proof will then be on the merchant. Keep your documents handy in case you need them: USPS receipt, proof of delivery, copies of all correspondance, etc. File the credit card chargeback now, because there ...


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