15

The US doesn't have a Value Added Tax, which is the one usually refundable upon departing the country... so sales taxes you pay in this country stay in this country and you don't get a refund. Just remember to treat the tax as an implied part of the price. (And be aware that state and local taxes may vary, so the total price may be higher in one place than ...


9

I had a similar offer recently from a seller from whom I had previously bought a product. They specified that I had to buy a particular product, leave a 5 star review for it and then email them with my PayPal account and they would pay me back the cost of the purchase via PayPal. Obviously there’s a chance this is a scam against the buyer, but I actually ...


7

Your simplest option, and probably the only reasonable one, is to dispute the original charge with your bank. Since you used a debit card and not a credit card, you don't have quite as much protection, but you still can dispute the charge and ask your bank to step in and help. See this debit card dispute article for more information on disputing a charge ...


7

Tax Refund: The US generally does not refund tax like other countries. For larger sales, you might want to try state tax refunds, check here: https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/detail/a_id/373/~/how-to-obtain-a-refund-of-sales-tax-paid-while-visiting-the-united-states US Customs: You never pay US customs when you leave, they don't care about what you take out ...


5

I've done this, they sent me the money via paypal first, I bought the item and then wrote a review. Nothing was done directly through amazon, so it wouldn't appear as a heavily discounted item. (i'd got into contact from replying to a spam email as I was bored). They didn't tell me I had to write a five star review, but could tell they were expecting it. ...


4

Digital content is a different beast than physical content, because usually you just buy a license to access the content. You may download it, but you're not allowed to send it to someone else. Some eBook authors will offer a money-back guarantee after, say, 30 days, or even longer. If the content is good, it's usually a good idea to do this. The ...


4

The lack of "About us" is veery unusual. I pretended to buy something, and the checkout page had a Terms of Service link, which I clicked on and read. There's a Post Office box which I googled. It turns out to be Stacks Design, PO Box 12113, San Francisco, CA 94112 http://www.shopstacks.com/stacks/ I wouldn't buy from them, though, because they're ...


4

Based on the card number: The card number prefix identifies the issuer of the card, and the digits that follow are used by the issuing entity to identify the cardholder as a customer and which is then associated by the issuing entity with the customer's designated bank accounts. In the case of stored-value type cards, the association with a particular ...


3

Let's reverse this. Imagine that they had charged you for a product they hadn't sent, and that you didn't notice. What would you like the company to do when they notice? I think we would all agree that you would want them to refund the money without being asked. Do the decent thing.


3

Perhaps the mistake will be caught before they actually refund the money. But if it isn't, and they refund it (presumably to a credit or debit card), I don't think you would "get in trouble" since this was Best Buy's mistake and not yours. The morally correct thing to do would be to contact them and explain that you didn't return the item and that they ...


3

The way I see it there are three possibilities: Key is 100% legit Key has already been used and will not work, or the key is not a valid one Key is legit but obtained by the seller through fraud or other unethical means Number 2 isn't that big of a deal. Ebay would be a safe way to pay and if the key doesn't work you're only out $2. The real concern is ...


3

Yes, you get a refund but only in a couple of states. If you are visiting Louisiana (e.g. New Orleans), there is sales tax refund on tangible items purchased at tax-free stores and permanently removed from the United States (http://www.louisianataxfree.com) . Clothes, shoes, makeup.. these are all items you can claim a tax refund for. Alas, I believe only ...


3

Usually, you take this to your credit card issuer. I don't know what the Argentinian laws are on the matter, but in all the places I do know what the laws are - they're the same. You dispute the charge with your credit card issuer claiming that the product is not as advertised. The issuer will contact the merchant account provider of the company you bought ...


2

It depends on what you're shopping for. Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals are often very good for some things and mediocre to downright bad for other things. I recommend trying to figure out what things you want to buy now, and tracking the price for 4-8 weeks. That will help give you a better price anchor to know when a deal is "good" vs. "not good".


2

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/customs/tax-and-duty.htm#3 explains the Import VAT situation quite well. As for who enforces and collects it, if you're talking about buying online and having it shipped to you then you'll notice on the parcel a Customs sticker declaring the contents and value. It is the responsibility of the courier company to collect any duty due ...


2

From an IT security standpoint, there is always some amount of risk when entering your personal payment information online. For payment methods such as Amazon and PayPal, you can be reasonably sure that you payment information is safe, but a random site that you've never heard of should be approached with slightly more caution, mainly because a smaller ...


2

Sales tax and luxury tax is what you will have to pay tax wise, and they are non-refundable (in most cases but the rules vary area to area). This really tripped up some friends of mine I had come from England. The rules are complicated and regional. Sales tax is anywhere from 0% to 10.25% and are not usually applied to raw foods. Luxury taxes are ...


2

If you paid by credit card, file a dispute with the credit card company. They will credit you the money immediately while they investigate. The burden of proof will then be on the merchant. Keep your documents handy in case you need them: USPS receipt, proof of delivery, copies of all correspondance, etc. File the credit card chargeback now, because there ...


2

There are a few reasons carriers charge more for residential delivery than they do for commercial delivery. Businesses are often near each other, there are fewer of them in town than houses, and they receive more packages than houses do. As a result, delivering to businesses means fewer stops and less driving around. Also, businesses generally always ...


2

Any advice? First check that the email definitely is from Best Buy and is not a generic scam/phishing email. For instance, does the email actually mention by name the product you bought (and that was supposedly returned)? Or does it say something generic like: As requested, we have issued a refund for the item you bought on [date of Black Friday] and ...


2

There are three perspectives here: legal, credit card, and credit reporting. From a contract law perspective, a contract requires a meetings of the minds. If you were mistaken as to a material fact regarding the contract, then that can invalidate the contract, especially if the misunderstanding was deliberately fostered by the other party. You agreed to the ...


1

Similar things have happened to me when using a debit card (in my case Maestro) where people typically use credit cards. It's also common if you come from a country where debit card are dominant (e.g. Netherlands or Germany) and you travel to a place were nearly all bank accounts come with a credit card (e.g. France). The reason this is happening is that ...


1

I have purchased activation codes for software from 3rd-party retailers and have not run into any cases where the key didn't work, so it's possible that it's legitimate. However, this site seems to support your suspicion that cheap Windows activation keys are being sold and may stop working after a while (if/when MS detects the fraud). So I see two ...


1

How much do you figure your time and energy are worth? How much of your time and energy would it take to correct Best Buy's mistake? If the item is more expensive than the worth of your time and energy to correct, then notify Best Buy. If the opposite, don't spend your time and energy correcting Best Buy's mistake. You won't get in trouble. They may ...


1

Bait-and-switch is annoying and usually illegal. However, if I'm reading your question correctly, you haven't lost any money, so you don't have any damages. If all you are trying to do is report them for an advertising violation, you could report a complaint with California's Attorney General. Don't expect to get a reward for bringing this to their ...


1

One thing to consider when creating an account vs checking out as a guest is how frequently you intend to use that site. From my own experience if I find that I plan to use a site regularly then I will create an account. Not so much because I think it will matter to them as much as for my own convenience. As a customer with an account if I want to do ...


1

The information is required by the issuing bank, so re the "no-name" gift cards - you have to check the requirements of the issuer. Some might require the card to be pre-registered for online usage, and at that time they'll require the address of the user to be used for authorizations. Many merchants also compare the billing and the shipping addresses and ...


1

The best time to start holiday shopping is just after the holidays, when stores are selling off their remaining overstock. Outside of that, there's no one answer.


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