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To answer your question, Options #1 and #2 are your only realistic options. Option #3 is not an option that I've ever known being successfully used, since that would require the IRS to let you withdraw the funds to another country before taxing them and presumably paying taxes 30-40 years in the future. There might be a tax treaty somewhere that allows this, ...


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I'd like to add that since 2016, any German bank that offers accounts to private customers has to offer at least a basic (minimal) private account to anyone who legally stays in the EU (see Jedermann-Konto). A residency/address in Germany is not required (even homeless people with no residential address anywhere do have the right to such a bank account). ...


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I have a similar background as yours. I am an F-1 PhD student and my wife is also in F-1 status. The Glacier is using the standard deduction for you ($12000 for 2018 FY). According to IRS info webpage, non-resident aliens cannot file with standard deductions except students and business owners. For most students, filing with standard deductions is more ...


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No, you will not, UNLESS you receive income IN GERMANY FROM GERMANY - i.e. you own a property that you rent out. If that is not the case, not living in germany is enough to make it tax free. As non-german resident you are only liable in germany for taxes that occur on income that you generate in germany.


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I can tell you by direct experience that you won't pay anything on German bank accounts in € currency that yields no interest. I live and work in Italy, and I have opened a German bank account (N26 Bank Gmbh). I have not paid 1 cent of taxes so far (2 years).


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Assuming you are not US citizen or tax payer. Your visa is a business visa, then there is no taxes applicable for you.


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You heard correctly that interest paid on NRE accounts in India is not taxable income in India. In particular, there is no Tax Deducted at Source (TDS) by your bank and sent to the Indian Income Tax Authority on your behalf, and you don't need to file any tax returns in India. But, if you are a tax resident of the US (different from visa status), your world-...


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You can always ask the Finanzamt. If the amount is small (say you make €100 a year) they might tell you "forget it" because the work handling your case costs more than the tax income. In the UK I think it is actually a low four digit number that you don't need to declare, Germany either has a similar limit, or there will be an amount where they are rather ...


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