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208

Plenty of people don't have credit/debit cards, if they had cash in hand they were probably just one of those people. Cash first, fuel 2nd with you pumping, not much risk to you in that scenario. Could it have been a ruse to get some free fuel from you or rob you while your guard was down? Sure, but seems less likely.


110

In my experience scammers are actually trying to get cash, not goods, so it's possible, but I don't see an obvious play. Some possibilities that come to mind: She takes off before giving you the cash She gives you counterfeit cash (good enough to fool you but not trained merchants) Some sort of short-change sleight-of-hand (I have actually been victim to ...


49

There's a small chance this was a scam, or a distraction for some third person to come and steal things from your car. Could also have been an attempt to pass counterfeit notes to an unsuspecting person (like a tourist) But here in New Zealand we do have a number of automated petrol stations that sell 91, 95, diesel, and perhaps a carwash. They cannot ...


46

It depends on how much equity you have in your home. Scenario 1: Your home is worth $100K, and your current mortgage is for $100K (or more which means you are underwater.) In this case you can't get a 2nd mortgage because: It's not legal to use the same collateral (e.g. some or all of your house) for multiple loans without all parties knowing about it. If ...


43

Since the cash option wasn't available at that time, I think Occam's Razor probably applies. Sure a scam is possible, but IMHO that would more likely have involved someone with no money and no wallet begging you to not leave them stranded at the gas station. A similar scenario happened to me once. I was getting gas late at night at a station that only ...


35

It's legal. That's what a home equity loan is, for example. More generally, what you're talking about is a "second mortgage". It has no effect on the primary mortgage that you've already made to your bank; they're still secured, and if you get foreclosed, they get paid, and only if there's something left over does the second mortgage holder get anything. ...


15

A month is not four weeks, so your fortnightly pay is not half of your monthly pay. There are twelve months in a year but there are 52.18 weeks (allowing for leap years but not for the fact that 1900 and 2100 are not leap years). So your fortnightly pay should be (2 * 12/52.18) of your monthly pay, which would be $1362.44. In fact they've been slightly ...


13

A mortgage will show as a lien on your property. Say your home is worth 400,000 (money units) but you only owe 200,000. A lender may be willing to be second in line, lending you another 100,000.


9

As a rental, this is not an ideal set of numbers. You manage to show a $255 'gain' but $275 is from payment to principal. So, from the start, you're out $20/wk. This ignores the $170K down payment, which has an opportunity cost, however you calculate it. You can assign the same rate as the mortgage, and it's nearly $10K/yr. Or the rate you feel your choice ...


8

In addition to all the other answers, here is a New Zealand Herald article from earlier this year about second mortgages, confirming that it is both legal and common in New Zealand. Whether or not it is a good idea in your situation is another question.


8

Note: that the New Zealand CPI in 2014 Q2 is 1.6% Year on Year, that is it is the inflation rate from 2013 Q2 to 2014 Q2. The quarterly change from 2014 Q1 to 2014 Q2 is 0.3%. Check out this Inflation Calculator. At the same time the Official Interest Rate in New Zealand was just raised on 24th July 2014 by 25 basis points to 3.5%. So your savings in the ...


8

If she never touches your card it is really just you selling her a gallon of fuel, not that big a deal. If she wants to buy a full tank then check the security features on the currency. If there is an alternate petrol station nearby suggest they try there for cash transaction or just donate her the fuel to get there if her car is on fumes. I would ask them ...


8

I think you've got this backwards. If you pay for something that your employer then reimburses you for, the amount you've paid in the end is 0. So you would owe tax on the full value of the benefit. If anything this would count as a "Benefit allowance" - it's certainly not a "Reimbursing allowance" which is defined as: Reimbursing allowances are payments ...


7

I don't know much about New Zealand, but here are just some general thoughts on things to consider. The big difference between buying a house and investing in stocks or the like is that it is fairly easy to invest in a diversified array of stocks (via a mutual fund), but if you buy a house, you are investing in a single piece of property, so everything ...


7

I am only familiar with American banks, but generally speaking, they will work with you if you can demonstrate that you have an adequate average income over a period of time. It is likely they will want a record of your income for at least the last 24 months (more would be better). The terms of the individual contracts (i.e. termination clauses, etc.) ...


7

Some people don't have or carry credit cards, for various reasons... so this could be legit. But there are ways of using this situation to take advantage of someone. One way it could be a scam is that she does this all day hoping someone hands her their card for her to go swipe at the machine, during which time she can photograph it and use it for online ...


7

To offer a different perspective here. We had an issue here in the states where someone would do something similar. They get you to run your card, or they prevent the pump from properly hanging up and completing a transaction after someone has finished. Then, once they have access to an active pump, they come through with like 5 cars and fill them all up, ...


5

First of all, make sure whether your current employer may fire you if you work for another employer. Not sure about the UK, but in Germany, you always have to file it with your employer, who may object to the side job of a full-time employee for various reasons. (E.g. you have to be fit when you work for your "main" employer, so you may not work for another ...


5

Yes, even for an unsecured loan the purpose of the loan is valuable to underwriters. Asking for price quotes seems excessive, I'd probably try a different bank. But "some not great" reasons for the loan might be a gigantic underwriting red flag causing you do undergo additional scrutiny...


5

I'm hopefully not too opinion-based here. If someone hands you $XYZ to fill up the same exact amount in their vehicle, with you there during the entire transaction, I cannot understand how that could be fraud*. Either they don't have a card on them, they don't have the funds available in their card, or there are strange requirements that they can't enter (...


4

You will need to create some form of legal entity through which you will account this job. If this is as simple as you describe - just working for someone else in different country then sole trader seems like the appropriate choice for you. It will also make running the accounts relatively straightforward. But you will have to do the accounts and pay taxes ...


4

Can the companies from USA give job to me (I am from New Zealand)? Job as being employee - may be tricky. This depends on the labor laws in New Zealand, but most likely will trigger "nexus" clause and will force the employer to register in the country, which most won't want to do. Instead you can be hired as a contractor (i.e.: being self-employed, from NZ ...


4

Before anything else, read up on the basics of economics. What is supply and demand? What are funds? What are and how do stocks work? etc. After that, there a few things you need to ask yourself before you even think about investing in anything: Do you have a (secure) job that, in case your initial investment fails will not impact your current way of ...


4

The risk in throwing out a low-ball offer in any negotiation is that it may indicate that you aren't serious / aren't aware of the true value of what you're trying to buy. If you went into a car dealership and saw a car with a $15k sticker price, and offered $5k, the salesperson might view you as a waste of time, and not properly engage. On the other hand, ...


3

After reviewing the tax treaty between New Zealand and Australia, I think the issue is whether or not you have an interest in a "permanent establishment" in Australia where you do business. The bank is not relevant as it is merely the vehicle by which you collect payment and would only come into the picture if you had an income bearing account (which you ...


3

Because you actually reside in New Zealand, your income taxes will be paid in New Zealand. However, as a non-resident of Australia you will have tax withholding on all of the interest you earn in an Australian bank account. Obviously, because that tax is paid to Australia, that will not be counted against your New Zealand income taxes due to the taxation ...


3

Apparently GST can only apply to properties used for commercial purposes (and not where the vendor uses it as a principal place of residence). Whether or not GST applies also depends on the combination of whether the vendor or purchaser or both are registered for GST. It appears to be complicated; other factors make a difference too. There's an explanation ...


3

A 15/5/5/5 lease is an initial 15 year lease with three 5 year options (meaning the tenant can leave without penalty, or without significant penalty, after 15, 20, or 25 years). This is common in commercial properties where the tenant would like the surety of knowing the lease terms for a longer time (30 years) but also the ability to leave prior to the ...


3

Depends how long you'll be resident in NZ for. Less than 183 days? Then no, you won't necessarily be tax resident. You'll need to declare your NZ income (and pay tax) in Australia, but New Zealand won't be fussed. It all depends on your tax residency


3

As far as I can tell you cannot claim your UK NICs back in New Zealand. The relevant tax treaty is on the HMRC page here and Article 2 is very clear about the UK taxes that are covered: income tax, capital gains tax, corporation tax and petroleum revenue tax. There is a note at the end of Article 2 that says This Convention shall also apply to any ...


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