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31

While there is no legal reason to have a minimum number of employees, there can be a practical reason. They want to look like a good solid investment so that investors will give them money, which is what an IPO is, really. Hiring lots of people is part of that. Once the investors are committed, they can cut expenses by firing people again. I have no ...


26

No, there is no minimum employee limit in order for a company to initiate an initial public offering.


20

A "stock price" is nothing but the price at which some shares of that stock were sold on an exchange from someone willing to sell those shares at that price (or more) to someone willing to buy them at that price (or less). Pretty much every question about how stock prices work is answered by the paragraph above, which an astonishingly large number of people ...


13

In simple terms, the value of a stock represents the total value of: Adding up the assets (the things it owns) Subtracting the liabilities (the things it owes) Adding the present value of all the predicted future income streams. Present value means that you look at all the future years' predicted income, and discount it to make up for the fact that you have ...


10

The EQQQ exchange-traded fund tracks the Nasdaq 100 and has US Dollar as its base currency. So you can buy it in GBP but performance will be affected by your GBP essentially being converted to dollars on the way in and way out. This can give you exchange rate downside, or upside, depending on the timing of your transactions. The EQGB is essentially the same ...


9

First - Google's snapshot - Then - Yahoo - I took these snapshots because they will not exist on line after the market opens, and without this context, your question won't make sense. With the two snapshots you can see, Yahoo shows the after hours trades and not just the official market close for the day. The amount it's down is exactly tracked from the ...


8

There are several neat (and AFAICT completely undocumented) resources on NASDAQ's public FTP site. For your needs I would recommend: /SymbolDirectory/nasdaqlisted.txt = US Tape C equities /SymbolDirectory/otherlisted.txt = US Tape A/B equities (depending on the value of the ETF column) As for listings and delistings, I know I've seen those updated in /...


7

No, you shouldn't wait for a crash. What if the crash doesn't come? What if the stocks you're interested in aren't specifically affected by a crash? What if what's considered a crash by others doesn't meet your criteria and you miss out? If it was that simple a concept, why doesn't everyone wait for a crash and then buy? How is your money being invested and ...


6

NDAQ is the ticker for stock in the company Nasdaq, Inc., which derives income from managing the exchange (transaction fees, listing fees, real-time quote feeds, etc). Here is their description of themselves: http://business.nasdaq.com/discover It's not the same as investing in one of the "Nasdaq" indexes, such as Nasdaq Composite or Nasdaq-100. Those you ...


5

Working for a lot of startups, I have seen this cycle. Really it has little to do with making the IPO look good because of number of employees, and is more about making the IPO look good because of planning for the future. Many times an IPO is released, it will be valued at $1.00 (made up) and the market will soar and spike. Now stock shares are valued at $...


5

They don't have to track each other, it could just be listed on more than one exchange. The price on one exchange does not have to match or track the price on the other exchange. This is actually quite common, as many companies are listed on two or more exchanges around the world.


5

Yes shares can be traded outside of an exchange, but a transfer agent is still involved. As stock shares represent various rights and privileges, like voting rights and dividends, someone needs to keep track of who owns what shares. While it can be done within the issuing company, handling ownership & proxy voting is usual outsourced to a stock transfer ...


5

I doubt anybody forced you to do anything. Without knowing the specific agreement you're referring to, I assume you mean the "Nasdaq User Agreement for Real-Time Quotes". Basically, it lays out the terms and conditions pertaining to its market quotes. These are provided for personal non-professional use and without warranties. If you can't be ...


4

Yes it is true. The US based companies have to meet the requirements placed on them by the US government. The agency with all these reports is the Security and Exchange Commission. They run the EDGAR system to hold all those required reports The SEC’s EDGAR database provides free public access to corporate information, allowing you to quickly research ...


4

Insiders are prevented from buying or selling shares except at certain periods right after information is disclosed publicly. But. People have bills to pay and kids to put through college and whatnot. So an insider can set up a plan where shares are sold on a specific schedule and they have no control over number of shares or timing. These plans (covered ...


4

From Wikipedia, the index consists of the 100 "largest" companies (by market capitalization) that meet certain requirements. The requirements for being eligible for the index are: The NASDAQ has over the years put in place a series of stringent standards that companies must meet before being included in the index. Those standards include the ...


4

A corporation is a company that is owned by stockholders. A publicly-traded corporation, like Facebook, Inc., is a company where shares of stock (small quantities of ownership in the corporation) are traded in a public stock market. If you look at the current quote for Facebook and it tells you that the share price is $131.88 USD, it means that you can ...


4

US stocks don't automatically list on different US exchanges. Exchanges such as NASDAQ and NYSE are independent and have different (though in many places overlapping) listing requirements including both quantitative initial listing standards (e.g., different earnings tests) as well as corporate governance standards (e.g., whether or not an internal audit ...


3

I'm having the same issue with AJ Bell, and I got this reply when asking for a list of stocks which settle in CREST: "Unfortunately, there is not a list of CREST settleable securities that we can send to you. We use something called the Crest Gui which is a system that allows us to check each stock an individual basis. However, we pay a fee to CREST for ...


3

You can download the daily Consolidated Tape from the link below. Click the "daily files tab" for FTP instructions. FTP is a very common protocol for dissemination of financial information. It is easy to set up an automated script or small application to download the file daily if needed. You should be able to produce a comprehensive historical list by ...


3

Their argument is mostly nonsense. Take someone like Tim Cook, CEO of Apple. He has a not very large salary, and makes a lot more money through stock bonuses. You would never, ever expect him to buy Apple shares. And assuming that he doesn't want to end up one day as the richest man in the cemetery, you would expect him to sell significant numbers of shares, ...


3

http://www.marketwatch.com/optionscenter/calendar would note some options expiration this week that may be a clue as this would be the typical end of quarter stuff so I suspect it may happen each quarter. http://www.investopedia.com/terms/t/triplewitchinghour.asp would note in part: Triple witching occurs when the contracts for stock index futures, ...


3

I do not believe Nasdaq provides OTCBB quotations through those services. The TotalView webpage says: TotalView, Nasdaq’s premier data feed, shows you every single quote and order at every price level in Nasdaq-, NYSE-, MKT- and regional-listed securities on Nasdaq. The phrase "Nasdaq-, NYSE-, MKT- and regional-listed securities" does not include pink ...


3

You cannot determine this solely by the ticker length. However, there are some conventions that may help steer you there. Nasdaq has 2-4 base letters BATS has 4 base letters NYSE equity securities have 1-4 base letters. NYSE Mkt (formerly Amex) have 1-4 base letters. NYSE Arca has 4 base letters OTC has 4 base letters. Security types other than equities ...


3

Why do stock markets allow these differences in reporting? The IRS allows businesses to use fiscal calendars that differ from the calendar year. There are a number of reasons a company would choose do this, from preferring to avoid an accounting rush at end of year during holiday season, to aligning with seasonality for their profits (some like to have Q4 ...


3

You are correct. The Alternative Uptick Rule does not allow a stock to be shorted if it has fallen 10% or more in a day. CLDR dropped 9.02% on Thursday (from $10.75 to $9.78). That's why it did not appear on the NASDAQ's Short Sale Circuit Breaker list (your link) and shorting continued to be allowed. Your second link to The "short sale volume percent" ...


3

Finally I was able to find the answer. There is no change in the duration of pre and post market hours on a partial trading day. Pre market starts from 4 AM ends at 9:30 AM. Normal market starts at 9:30 and ends at 1 PM (because of partial trading day) Post market starts at 1 PM and ends at 5 PM.


2

I would say that non-displayed orders would be hidden orders, however I have never heard them being termed this way. A hidden order is basically a large order placed usually by an institution to buy/sell a large number of shares. They place the order as a hidden order so that it cannot be seen in the order book so that it does not move the market due to its ...


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