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4

Net Other Assets include cash and receivables and payables related to open security or capital stock trades. Presumably they have higher payables (a short-term liability) than receivables and cash, resulting in a net negative "asset" category.


7

Can someone explain what do you mean by Government Money Market Fund? I looked at the link you provided and pulled the list of: Composition by Instrument (The makeup of a fund's portfolio expressed in terms of asset allocation and industry and sector diversification.) AS OF 4/30/2021 U.S. Treasury Bills 35.52% U.S. Treasury Coupons 8.31% U.S. Treasury ...


7

EDIT: answered the title question. What is a Government Money Market Fund? What it says on the tin: it's a money market fund backed by very short term government bonds. Is this a Fund to temporarily park the money when there is high volatility in the market? Yes. BUT... you -- a consumer investor -- don't know when the volatility starts and when it will ...


1

https://www.investopedia.com/articles/bonds/08/bond-risks.asp Interest Rate Risk and Bond Prices Reinvestment Risk and Callable Bonds Inflation Risk and Bond Duration Credit/Default Risk of Bonds Rating Downgrades of Bonds Liquidity Risk of Bonds PRRIX is a TIPS (aka variable rate) bond fund, which protects against Inflation Risk, which means that even ...


13

Past performance accounts for the expense ratio, but is (proverbially) not indicative of future results. In particular, going by past performance and choosing a fund that has recently beaten the market will, according to the efficient market hypothesis (EMH), give no greater chance of beating the market in the future. In fact, it may incur excessive risk. ...


4

Lowering the expense ratio, according to my understanding, only matters when we have another fund with a similar distribution of holdings, and has a lower expense ratio which yields a higher return. That's a big "only", since investment companies usually offer similar funds.


8

Yes. While the expense ratio is deducted from the NAV, it is still relevant. Imagine you have two index funds tracking the same index. One with 0.1% and the other with 1% TER. Obviously the cheaper fund will outperform the expensive one. Now we add a layer of complexity and pick active funds. The expected return of a randomly chosen fund before costs is the ...


0

I don't think there's and SEC guidance since that document (from what I can tell) is not meant for fractional year reporting, only actual exact 1-, 5- and 10-year returns. I need to calculate the average annual return of the fund for March 6, 2008 - Dec 20, 2020 One method would be to calculate the fractional part separately (i.e. number of days from 3/6/...


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