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Certainly the landlord has every incentive to want to pin you down for another 1 year's commitment, but that is not required. Almost any US lease falls over to a "month to month" lease at the end of the term. I know you're concerned about the rent going up significantly if you do, but every rental I've ever had, the month-to-month rate remains the same as ...


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As others have mentioned, a month-to-month agreement is the typical and likely solution. Another option may be to get a normal lease but with a provision for early termination. When I was looking to buy a house years ago I was in a similar situation where my lease would be up in a couple months but I couldn't guarantee finding and closing on a home in that ...


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My personal experience renting is the best thing is to tell your landlord exactly what is going on in your life and your situation, so even if you do not have month to month written into your existing lease, then they are able to offer it to you, most landlords understand that their renter is a temporary situation that will one day change and if you have a ...


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Read your lease. It may already have a provision that it switches to month to month automatically after the lease term expires. I've had a few leases like that in the (distant) past. If that's the case, then you don't really have to do anything.


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I don't know your landlord, but most places allow you to sign 1-month, 2-month, 3-month, 6-month, etc. leases, but the shorter the lease, the higher the rent. Also, check the lease break penalty in your contract, if it's 1 month's rent(very common), it may be worthwhile to just eat the hit, if the new job pays better.


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I was in a similar situation a couple of years ago, I was working abroad and didn't know when I would have to leave the country. My landlord made me sign a one-year lease and agreed that I could transfer the lease to a new tenant for the remainder of the lease. This is called a sublease. His only condition was that the new tenant would be approved by the ...


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My advice would be to ask about switching to a month-to-month. Be prepared for a significant difference in the cost per month. In a recent lease the switch to month-to-month after the initial lease period resulted in a 15% higher rent amount compared with the 12 month extension rate. If you know that you will be in the place less than the break even point, ...


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Inquire with the landlord about switching to a month-to-month lease, meaning you wouldn't have to renew for an entire year. It's been a while since I was a renter but I recall most apartment leases I've had in my life being for a one-year term for the first year, then month to month after that. You say you're a good tenant and he's a reasonable landlord, he ...


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