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37

There are often taxes (by whatever name) that scale with the property price. Agents’ fees are also often a percentage of the property price. These costs are usually a small but noticeable percentage of the total price. Aside from this, you’re mainly looking at the difference between what you get and what you pay. If you are buying and selling properties at ...


28

The biggest stumbling blocks to these types of questions are when people want a refund, or in the cases where they haven't paid in advance they want to avoid being responsible for the last few months rent payments. As a former landlord there can still be things to consider. If the unit will be empty until the end of the lease: Don't let your renters ...


24

Since you don't mention anything about getting a refund or anything similar I don't see what could be an issue with the scenario presented. There is nothing to prohibit you from having 2 apartments (or any amount of property for that case) rented at the same time. As mentioned in the comments depending on how your contract is worded you may be required to ...


12

You care if you’re trading up or down, which is very common. The amount that you have to pay to trade up, or receive when trading down, shrinks and grows with the average house price. You also care about the effect on the ease of buying and selling. Generally speaking, in a booming market it is easy to sell but hard to buy, while in a declining market it’s ...


8

Auto insurance prices vary heavily between regions/states of the US, as the laws and regulations not only differ but so do the rate of claims and losses, nature of competition in each market, etc. The only way to define a good rate or a bad rate is to get competing quotes from other companies. With the internet this has become much easier and less time ...


6

Houses don't all appreciate at the same rate. You'd care a LOT if, for example, the house you're selling appreciated 30% in the time you've lived there, but the house you're buying has appreciated 60% and happened to by 3x as expensive when you bought the first house. £100,000 x 1.30 = £130,000 £300,000 x 1.30 = £390,000 £300,000 x 1.60 = £480,000 What ...


5

I'm doing this right now. (My lease ends in a couple of months, but I have already gotten a new place.) I usually overlap by a couple of weeks, just because I don't like rushing to move. So yes, I can verify firsthand that it is possible. You'll be paying a little under twice as much in living expenses during that time, but if that's not a financial problem,...


4

Depends on what the original price for the house you're moving to was compared to your previous house. Suppose that you own a $500,000 house, and were looking at buying an $800,000 house. While you're considering your decision, both houses go up 10%. The price difference is (800,000 * 1.1) - (500,000 * 1.1) = 330,000 rather than the original $300,000 ...


4

You're correct that in theory it should't matter; "sell low + buy low" is effectively a "wash sale" in terms of your equity. But you bet you care. If you are trading a house when the market is soft... You may not be able to get financing The reason prices went up in the first place is that you had many people bidding on the available housing stock, and ...


4

yes, you do. Its an ironic situation where people with housing think they're getting richer when house prices go up. But consider this: years ago, you might have bought a flat in London for £100k (yeah, 20 years ago!) and moving to another one would set you back, say 1% estate agent fee and no stamp duty - or £1000. Imagine that flat doubles in price, now ...


3

One reason you might care about whether the housing market has gone up or down is your own financial situation. If you are tight on cash but not cash flow, you might want to use the equity in your existing property to roll into the down payment on a new property. Let's say you bought for £100k, you put £20k down, and the property is now worth £120k. ...


3

If it's a Roth 401k, you can withdraw what you invested (but not the growth) at any time, without penalty. Then you just have to wait until you are 59.5 to withdraw any growth that occurred. I do all my 401k management online, so I see no reason why that couldn't be done from a foreign country. If your company's 401k broker doesn't support that, you ...


3

It does make sense to contribute to your 401k, even if you plan to move out of the country. Besides the "headache managing a fund in a foreign country", you can keep your 401k even if you're residing in a foreign country (source). Your best financial outcome would be to contribute to your 401k with matches and hold it until you're 59.5 and just figure out ...


2

By the law, you are committed to the lease; prepaying has nothing to do with that. So yeah, you can store stuff in there, or perhaps investigate doing AirBnB. I assume you'd rather have the money back, though. You are allowed to "break the lease" by mutual consent with the landlord, because both of you are allowed to agree to change the terms. This is ...


1

House price fluctuations are going to affect your loan-to-value (LTV) ratio when you move. That can dictate the amount you're eligible to borrow and the rate offered. Simple example: You have a £25k deposit which you use to buy a £100k house (clearly not an example tailored to your location). Your LTV is 75%. If house prices in your region have risen by an ...


1

If you are persistently committed to the online study, you should also think of the advantages of the slow online study: you may have immediate access to the lecturer's advice. Yes, the northern weather is terrible, but there is no guarantee of greener pasture in a place like silicon valley. Subtracting the weather factor, the potential $120K looks ...


1

As this is a tricky question to answer I will be a bit wage with my answer. The best financial advice I got was always invest in yourself first! Then in other thinks like savings and other cash flow aspects. So if you think that moving will be beneficial for your self and you can afford it, do it. If you don't think you will manage it, stay and save up more ...


1

Generally, each country taxes by his own rules. That means that worst case, you do owe taxes in all countries you worked or lived in. However, most countries have made contracts (treaties) to avoid double taxation. Typically, in the tax declaration for the second country, you enter the amount of taxes already paid in the first country, and the tax gets then ...


1

Yes, you can rent as many apartments as you like. Simple question, simple answer. I don't know why we're trying to make it so complicated?


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