109

You can't prove a negative. Therefore, you cannot prove that an invoice is unpaid; it is assumed to be unpaid on claiming so, and the payer has to prove that he paid. That should be easy for him, if they did pay.


103

The two basic rules for not getting scammed while apartment hunting are: Never sign the contract before you inspected the property in person Never pay money to inspect a property in person Carefully chosen pictures can hide a lot of nasty details. Pictures also don't communicate sound or smell. So insist on a tour of the apartment before signing the lease ...


51

People do not ask strangers to buy houses for them. Apart from all the other reasons, you are going to have to engage a lawyer or other professional to do the actual transaction, and that is something he could do by picking up a phone. Also, seriously, what are the chances that a person you meet randomly online happens to want to move to your town that ...


41

I met a guy online Scam Does this really need elaboration? The simple fact is: What he claims to need from you is something he can readily obtain from any Realtor, so there's no earthly reason for him to deal with you. Further, you are not a licensed real estate agent, and he wants you to step into the role of one. That should be warning enough, and ...


36

Consider for a minute what the implications would be if this were a business or nonprofit. Taxes are collected from net earnings. 5 parents contribute $100 each to an organization, the organization buys $500 of stuff. $500 Revenue ($500) Expenses ————— 0 Net Income $0 of net income times a 15% tax rate is a tax liability of $0. If the Legos ...


34

No one appears to answering the stated question, so: How do you send money when you're not sure it's not a scam? Don't If you aren't 100% sure it isn't a scam, don't send money. If it isn't a scam, any renter or seller will acquiesce to any reasonable requests you have to make sure it's not a scam before sending money. Obviously scammers won't. Once you ...


32

Unfortunately we live in an age where a large amount of apartments and houses are being rented on sites like airbnb as well, not even inspecting the apartment is foolproof. Be wary of increasingly common scams of people renting a house/apartment on airbnb for a week and running with the money. The safest bet is probably to get a real estate agent from a ...


22

This is simply a variant of deposit scams. No, you will not be arrested as this is just part of social engineered blackmail by the scanner. However, this an indication of identity theft, you must report the incident to the bank immediately (don't delay, call today). Check whether it is necessary to file a police report or whether the bank anti-fraud ...


15

There are a few tips I've discovered during years of hunting for different apartments to weed out suspicious listings. Your situation does seem reminiscent of a time I was nearly scammed on a rental property where the listing was a guy who had moved(from Michigan) to New York for a job and still owned his house in Michigan. We really liked the pictures of ...


15

Cash. The $10K law is for literal cash. An envelope of $100 bills, or bag of smaller denominations. Not movements of money, the kind that occur all the time. I am retired, and make regular transfers of over $10K. Direct transfers from broker (IRA/401(k)) to my local bank. No red flags. That said, try your plan for one small cycle and let us know how it ...


14

Some suggestions. First ask your bank if it is possible to accept a cheque in US dollars. Some won't but some will, possibly for a fee. Second ask your bank if there is an account you can open that would take a US dollar cheque. Lots of banks can set those up, again possibly for a fee. Try another bank in your country off they won't. This is your most ...


14

It is a fraud/scam. No stranger wants to give you money. If they are rich they should be paying the transfer fee. But they expect you to pay in advance. You used the contact info the stranger gave you to verify what the stranger said. Of course the people at the other end verified it, they are in on it.


13

Is it a scam? Yes. what should i do??? Stop responding to scammers on the internet when they message you. How will I get scammed if I send my bank details? It doesn't matter. You don't have to understand how the scam works in order for it to be a scam. The real scam might not even involve your bank details. They might be asking for your bank ...


12

Yes, this is a scam. The reason it seems weird to you is that it is weird. A real person wanting to give money away will find someone that they know in real life, not a stranger that they came across searching online. In the future, you should probably treat unsolicited messages that you receive with more suspicion.


12

This could easily be considered a personal gift, which doesn't have any tax implications below $15,000 currently. Even if it wouldn't be considered a gift, it shouldn't be considered income for the person who made the purchase on behalf of a group of people, who all benefit from the purchase.


11

Here are a few questions for you: Do you know who He is other than Lord, God or Almighty? Did you lose your ATM card? Do you know the person who emailed you (in your case: Rev James Koko)? If you don't know the person who emailed you (James Koko), do you know how this person may have your email but not info about where you live or your phone number? Do you ...


11

The parent is not receiving any income, merely acting as an agent or conduit for the group. If the group compensated the parent for their assistance it could be considered wages, and they'd have to pay income tax on it. But this is hardly different from the group opening a shared bank account that they all contribute to, and then writing a check from that ...


10

It is a typical Romance scam. There is a series of the script the scammer will use. Asking for your personal details Asking for your bank account Say they need your send them money to "clear" the bank transfer They have some relative that wants to meet you and you should "buy" them a gift card and send the gift card to them. Scammer may conduct the fake ...


10

You don't need proof. If you believe someone owes you, just bill them for whatever you think is owed. The burden of proof is on them to show they paid. On the off-chance they have, any competent business will have no trouble showing this. However, that should not be happening. Sometimes, that is a routine issue that is easily explained, like paper ...


9

There's no safe way of sending money to a scam-artist. Once it's on their hands, you'll have a hard time to identify his identity or to request the money back. Only decent people would worry about sending money back, obviously. This totally appears to be a scam for several reasons already mentioned. If you are still not convinced and fear to let a bargain ...


9

I gather from your question that you have 2 bank accounts, and your agent (seller who sells assets you owned) posted the proceeds to the wrong bank account, but it’s still your bank account that the money went to. (Frame challenge) Instead or reversing the transaction and taking the risk that the seller doesn’t get it right this time, or that they just ...


9

PayPal, as a purchase. Ask him to invoice you for a purchase. You won’t hear from him again :) What's really happening here This is the backside of another scam they are working concurrently. That Chase account you're wiring to actually belongs to Susan Danvers, who lives in rural Pennsylvania and is thrilled to have a "virtual" office assistant job ...


9

UPDATE: After comments from Hart CO, I've removed references to "wire-transfer" as these mostly can't be reversed (see this question on Quora), although they can be in some cases of fraud (e.g. perhaps if the scammers sent a wire-transfer from some other victim's hijacked account). If the OP's phrase "Someone wired my friend money" does actually indicate a ...


7

If there were such 100% reversible payment methods, there would be scams in the opposite direction, where a tenant rents an apartment, stays there for a month, them disappears and reverses their payment. Also, if the price is such that you feel you "should be very fast about pursuing it", it's another reason to be rather slow and cautious about it. The ...


7

This is a classic scam. Stay away. Look up the "Advance Fee Fraud" on Google.


7

It's very unlikely that you'll find an a free ongoing service for this. Anyone who transfers money faces risks from fraud: bad checks, forged money orders, stolen credit cards, hacked bank accounts. No-one could afford to offer this service for free for very long, (particularly internationaly) as they'd go broke from the fraudulent transactions. ...


5

It turned out that the best way was to open a dollar account with a UK bank. I went with Lloyds, and now have a international USD account based on the Isle of Man, which is very cheap to run.


5

The more important question: What kind of friend is this? Is this someone you see several times a week in person? Or is this a person on the internet that you have nice conversations with, but who you have never seen in your life? It is a typical scam that someone transfers money into your account, you send it elsewhere, and a week or two later your bank ...


5

This seems like a pretty classic Nigerian scam. If you continue with this, they'll likely give some reason that you need to give them a "small" amount of money to facilitate the transaction. (They'll likely continue to get as many of these "small" payments from you as possible as long as you continue to go along with the scam, or simply disappear with the ...


5

There is a common scam: You have a client that can only pay be cheque. You do work for them, send a bill for $5,700 and they accidentally send a cheque for $7,500. Easy enough mistake to make, so they ask you to bank the cheque and send back the $1,800. You may be clever enough not to lose the $1,800, but you’ll never get paid for your work. If it’s not ...


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