241

Absolute scam. Any time anyone asks you to open a bank account so they can send you money and then you have to send some portion of it back to them, it's a guarantee that it's a scam. What happens is that your dad will deposit the check and transfer it to this woman, then the check will bounce (or turn out to be fake altogether) and your dad will be on the ...


220

Stop doing this. If your friend contacts you, don't answer until you've followed through on step 2. Go get a lawyer. They might advise you to contact the police and tell the police what's been going on before you get a knock on the door with a warrant behind it. Here is why: you are almost certainly inadvertently participating in money laundering. The funds ...


192

I think it is likely that your “friend” is doing something illegal, and that she is putting these payments in your name to avoid getting caught. You may be being used as an unwitting money mule. I recommend steering clear of this. Tell her that you will no longer pick up any of these payments for her, whether or not your name is on them. Giving your ...


114

Scam/Criminal. There is no limit how much money he can send into the world, so the excuse is BS. Of course, nobody can say for sure, but the chances are that it is money laundering: Illegally acquired cash is paid in, and the receiver sends it right back as a clean electronic transfer. When the FBI (or the DEA or another alphabet-soup agency) catches up ...


108

This is either a scam, or a legitimate error by the sender [more likely a scam, just due to statistical likelihood, though details are unclear]. Either way, the money isn't yours, and eventually you will need to pay it back, when the problem is discovered. Don't wait for someone to contact you. Lodge a formal notice with your bank (ie: in writing, with ...


104

The two basic rules for not getting scammed while apartment hunting are: Never sign the contract before you inspected the property in person Never pay money to inspect a property in person Carefully chosen pictures can hide a lot of nasty details. Pictures also don't communicate sound or smell. So insist on a tour of the apartment before signing the lease ...


102

The other answers describe why this is highly likely to be a scam. This answer describes why you don't want to get involved, even in the unlikely case that it isn't a scam. I'm describing this using US law (which I'm not particularly familiar with, so if I go astray I'd suggest others fix any flaws in this answer), but most other countries have similar ...


99

Yes, it is a scam. Think about it: Why would a stranger offer to give you money? Why would she need you to pay her own employees? She wouldn't. It is a scam. You have more to lose than just the $25 that is in the account. Just as has happened to your dad before, you will be receiving money that is not real, but paying real money out somewhere else. One ...


83

This sounds like a scam. Did they email you out of the blue to offer you this 'job', by any chance, and you'd never heard of them before? That's an incredibly large red flag in and of itself. While I don't know quite what the scam is likely to be, here's how I would suggest it might work: They sell something to Person A for, say, $500 You get sent $500 by ...


79

I'm troubled by this: either the person is financially competent, or they are not. If he's genuinely not financially competent, then I would say the trustee should not be handing them $3000/month and trusting them to pay all their living-expense bills: gas, electric, auto insurance, car payments, etc. The trust should take those over and should own the car....


78

Because banks still rely on processes and software that were established many decades ago, when constant, semi-instant communication was not technologically possible. Instead, you would have batch processes that run on huge mainframe computers overnight. Changing these processes is extremely difficult, because there are so many things tying into it - taxes,...


74

Don't do it. If it's not the classic scam described in Daniel Anderson's answer, then it's probably money laundering. In that case, the woman would actually wire you money, which you have to wire to someone else she names. This is done to enter illegally gained money into the regular money circulation, hiding the trail. If this is the case, you would have ...


69

Have you considered a pull based system rather than a push based system? Set up a bank account with the full amount. Engineer or such that your relative can only access it via a debit card. Set the debit card daily limit to 100USD. Profit EDIT: The OP asked how to deal with irregular unexpected expenses, such as, the beneficiary needing to replace his ...


61

I think you're overthinking it. They are likely nowhere near you and they don't actually want any puppies or the hassle of coming in person. The likely way it works is: they wire you the money and tell you the shipping company will pick the puppies up. Then they email a bit later and say "oops sorry, shipping company can't do it after all, please send us ...


57

So just to be clear, she gets so many of these ~$500 transactions she can't even make the time to show up and collect them all? Yet, she still holds down a day job cutting hair? You are on here asking if this is strange because well, it seems very strange. "Bitcoin" something something is a convenient way to explain away strange income sources. It's ...


52

People do not ask strangers to buy houses for them. Apart from all the other reasons, you are going to have to engage a lawyer or other professional to do the actual transaction, and that is something he could do by picking up a phone. Also, seriously, what are the chances that a person you meet randomly online happens to want to move to your town that ...


43

While the US hosts most of the world's innovative startups, its own financial and banking systems are very slow to change. The infrastructure exists, however the ACH transfers are not wide-spread between individuals. Banks much prefer the option of bill-pay (i.e.: as you said, mailing a check, something in other countries people wouldn't even think of), ...


42

I met a guy online Scam Does this really need elaboration? The simple fact is: What he claims to need from you is something he can readily obtain from any Realtor, so there's no earthly reason for him to deal with you. Further, you are not a licensed real estate agent, and he wants you to step into the role of one. That should be warning enough, and ...


38

It isn't a simple reversal, because money actually changed hands when the transfer was made. When the transfer was made 50,000 Euros was credited to a UK bank, and some number of kronor was debited to your Swedish bank. When the transaction was reversed 50,000 Euros were transferred back to the Swedish bank. Those Euros are now worth fewer kronor, so your ...


35

quid has expressed some of the disadvantages with this approach, but there is another. Vendors will not want to give you any goods you buy with your credit card until they are sure they will get the money. With your suggested approach buying something with a credit card now looks like: Vendor runs the credit card and have you punch in your PIN. Vendor waits ...


34

No one appears to answering the stated question, so: How do you send money when you're not sure it's not a scam? Don't If you aren't 100% sure it isn't a scam, don't send money. If it isn't a scam, any renter or seller will acquiesce to any reasonable requests you have to make sure it's not a scam before sending money. Obviously scammers won't. Once you ...


32

This is a scam, I'm adding this answer because I was scammed in this fashion. The scammer sent me a check with which I was to deposit. When the money showed up in my account, I would withdraw the scammer's share, and wire the cash to its destination. However, it takes a couple days for a check to clear. Banks, however, want you to see that money, so they ...


32

Unfortunately we live in an age where a large amount of apartments and houses are being rented on sites like airbnb as well, not even inspecting the apartment is foolproof. Be wary of increasingly common scams of people renting a house/apartment on airbnb for a week and running with the money. The safest bet is probably to get a real estate agent from a ...


29

There is actually a popular Paypal scam that operates differently from Vicky's answer. They will send you ask you for your Paypal email, and send you an email invoice from a site that looks like Paypal, but actually isn't. It's a spoof page. The attack is twofold: First, when you enter your account information to "login" to "Paypal" you give them your ...


28

The answers here are all correct. This is 100% scam, beyond any reasonable doubt. Don't fall for it. However, I felt it valuable to explain what would happen were you to fall for this. It's not all that hard to understand, but it involves understanding some of the time delays that exist in modern banking today. The most important thing to understand is ...


27

There are several red flags here. You are not licensed to operate as a financial entity and/or transfer money (credits to @Brick - it does not apply only to USA). You cannot be sure you are not participating in money laundering. Did they send you a contract? can they get my bank account info in any way from me transferring money to them? Probably yes. ...


25

Each ATM, the machine, belongs to one or more networks. Those networks work with multiple types of cards. Each card belongs to one or more networks. The overlap of the networks the machine belongs to, and the card belongs to determines if the card works and what fees and limits apply. In general if the credit card belongs to one of the major networks (VISA, ...


24

Credit card fraud is an extremely (to stress, EXTREMELY) small proportion of total credit card transactions. The card issuing entities all offer zero fraud liability, even on debit cards. There are millions of transactions every day and fraud loss just isn't worth developing, and supporting, an additional authentication layer that faces the consumer. To ...


22

Since the transaction was not your bank's mistake (but a decision by the Indian government) why should your bank bear the cost of the unsuccessful transaction? Your bank charged a fee for a service that you were willing to pay for. You might be able to negotiate a full or partial refund, and I have done the same with my own bank for fees that I didn't feel ...


22

is this legal? No, in most places. You are likely participating in money laundering, fraud, tax evasion, or other sorts of crime. You are acting as a money mule. It is bad enough if you receive no monetary reward but if you take a cut of the proceeds of crime you are more likely to be deemed complicit in those crimes. Can I get into trouble doing this? ...


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