11

If your brother in law is the account owner, he is the one at risk. But, if he isn't paying on time, you might find your service turned off and be stuck. In my opinion, the potential bad feelings aren't worth whatever the savings might be.


10

If you add up the total payments on the phone and compare it to the price of buying an unlocked phone, you'll be able to see if there is any financial advantage to one way or the other. Often (at least in the U.S.) the 2-year total of phone payments adds up to the retail cost of an unlocked phone almost exactly -- in other words, you aren't paying interest, ...


8

It is possible to negotiate anything. However, if the internet service options in your area are limited, the likelihood of your successfully reducing the price is not great. In areas where there is more competition, internet service providers often offer limited-time promotional reductions in price. When these promotions expire, you can often convince the ...


8

Having a carrier-locked phone may make using it in other countries difficult or expensive compared to buying a local SIM card. You can generally get the unlock code after the phone is paid off, or buy it from one of the companies which specializes in breaking the code systems for these, but that's either a delay or extra cost. If the upgrade is "free", you'...


6

The big risk is not financial but losing your phone service (and numbers, if you care about that) if they end up with some crazy bill they're unable to pay. Your number is potentially held hostage against porting to another carrier when the account it's on has a balance due even if the charges are unrelated to that line. I think you'll find you can save a ...


6

If your usage is minimal, then you may be best off with a pay as you go plan from a cheap operator like 1pmobile or Giffgaff. If you are going to be using more then there are a number of £4-£5 monthly plans where a bare minimum of data is offered in addition to quite a lot of minutes/texts. The data on these plans is a negligable fraction of the cost.


5

This won't really be easily measurable. The price of a mobile plan will be primarily driven by what the market can bear, bearing in mind competition. Clearly there will be some kind of floor set in the long-term by the costs of actually providing the service, and mobile providers have had to invest heavily to provide fast data networks (3G/4G) with ...


4

In addition to considering your total expenditures on the plan and phone for either case, consider that the value you get from a locked vs. an unlocked phone of the same model are different: Generally, your carrier will only provide technical support for locked phones. A locked phone will be preloaded with software by the carrier that you may not want, but ...


4

Is it common to punt you over to phone contact, then demand you come into a store with a stack of identity docs? Is the "sign up online" thing just a lure to get you to call or appear? (in other words, under what circumstances does online actually work)? I don't recall ever having to bring in a stack of documents, my first smartphone purchase was ...


4

My experience has been that as long as someone's willing to pay the bill, the phone companies don't care so much who that is. Your wife is your parents' daughter-in-law and therefore "family", however that may not meet the phone companies' technical definition of family, as she lives with you and not her parents. So, read the fine print; what qualifies as ...


3

It should not be a problem to move her over to your parents' plan. My brother has his own house and recently transferred his number from his own account to our parents' plan and just offered to pay our parents the difference after adding his line.


3

Your best bet is to call your credit card. However, it's extremely unlikely that your phone would be covered unless you bought it, straight out, on your credit card. The situation you are describing is one where you do not buy the phone (until your contract is up), and so you should not expect your extended warranty to apply. Note that it is often cheaper, ...


3

2-years of profit from your contract exceeds the cost of the discount (if any) they are actually providing you, keeping you under contract is their motivation. To that end, providing you an incentive (real or simply perceived) to sign up for another 2-years starting now makes a lot more sense than risking you switching providers at end of your contract. We ...


3

There are many possible reasons, for example: If you are taken by the features of the new iPhones and want one, you have to pay through the nose to get out of this contract you just signed. prices for the old iPhones will drop significantly when the new ones come out. You basically bought the old one for a higher price. by keeping your contract date just ...


2

Most of them do. Data protection laws, need country to be specific. As much as I know, there is nothing in data protection that stops from using the data for analytics to improve the service to you. They can't sell individual data to 3rd party, they can sell aggregated data


2

I performed customer service, technical support, and various managerial and backend tasks for a major U.S. cellular provider for nearly a decade. Here's what I can come up with, just from memory. The bottom line here is: If trust is even remotely an issue, get out of this sooner rather than later. There's probably twenty things I'm forgetting that can burn ...


2

is your credit history ruined, or merely dinged? Is the blow recoverable? Any bad credit rating event is recoverable given enough time / money to solve the problem. As far as "Ruined" vs" "Dinged", well, that's a matter of opinion; some people think that one bad item is the end of the world, others not so much. You will have an unpaid debt listed on ...


2

I've found you can give the money to charity. If you text REDCROSS to 90999 for example you can give $10 to the redcross


2

Our Pay as you go phones tend do go on a basis of how much money you give them upfront. It varies from plan to plan. There are a few annual options available. [PagePlus and TMobile both do that] PagePlus [You can activate a third party CDMA phone] TMobile [GSM] Simple Mobile Virgin Mobile [Sprint] H20 - Mobile [Mostly for Data usage] Net10/Trakphone [has ...


1

Your negotiating power depends a lot on COST. See, no company that is not run by total idiots will enter a contract for a small monthly fee when it has no way to make a profit. Living in a rural area, the cost of providing you with internet is not negotiable, because basically putting cables into the ground is a cost that MUST be paid, AND it is not ...


1

I'm not sure if there are nuances between countries and appreciate your question is specifically about the US, but in the UK, mobile phone contracts, including SIM only, as seen by the chat in this experion website chat shows that mobile contracts are included in credit ratings for 6 years.


1

I have never seen any of my mobile phone providers report any data to any credit agency. They tend to only do that if you don't pay on time. Maybe sometimes it helps, but from my experience over the last decade - it must be some very rare times.


1

In the UK an upgraded (locked) phone is either available because you've already paid for it by continuing with an expensive contract for (typically) at least two years after you'd paid off your last handset or is available if you commit to a new 2-year tie-in with the carrier. Mostly, when I have compared them, it is cheaper to buy an unlocked 'phone and go ...


1

There is another option: renewing the contract for another two years without getting a new phone and negotiating for better terms or a lower monthly charge. You can still get your phone unlocked as it has been paid off, which allows you to use local SIM cards when traveling abroad. The downside of not getting a new phone is that the current one's battery ...


1

Walmart sells several brands of prepay/pay-as-you-go cellphone plans and has stores just about everywhere; I suggest walking into a Walmart and asking one of the electronics employees about the plans they sell. That will give you some idea of the range of service plans out there. Their website for service plans is here, but you'll probably end up doing a ...


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