23

HR told us nothing could be done to correct it. Is this true? Probably not. I think it helps that only 11 days (now 12) has passed since coverage ended. It's possible the (incorrect) premium hasn't even been paid yet out of your husband's paycheck. IMHO, there would be someone at the company that can help you fix this. I'm sure they can get creative and ...


14

Are you asking why you aren't entitled to money that someone gave you by mistake? I think the answer is obvious even if you don't like it. If you overpaid your taxes how would you feel if the Government said, "Sorry, finder's keepers. It isn't OUR mistake you can't do math." Your best course of action is to work with the agency to see if they will work out ...


13

Please note: I am not a lawyer. I will assume you are in the United States. In the event of a discrepancy between the written and numerical amounts on a check or other negotiable instrument, the written amount legally takes precedence over the numerical amount. The Uniform Commercial Code states: § 3-114. Contradictory terms of instrument. If an instrument ...


9

You can submit a claim to TurboTax using their online form. As others have stated, you still owe your taxes, the claim is only for the interest and penalties from the IRS due to TurboTax's error. How to trust TurboTax again? I wouldn't worry too much about it -- sure, getting a nastygram from the IRS can be unsettling, but it's not really a big deal. You ...


9

I gather from your question that you have 2 bank accounts, and your agent (seller who sells assets you owned) posted the proceeds to the wrong bank account, but it’s still your bank account that the money went to. (Frame challenge) Instead or reversing the transaction and taking the risk that the seller doesn’t get it right this time, or that they just ...


9

The Problem You obviously have a legal right to control over the IRA. However, in deciding how to get to a position whereby you can reassert that control, it will help to consider things from their point of view: They have a "several years" old, dormant account. It will have certain details associated with it, including the name of the (now defunct) ...


9

You are in trouble, but possibly not too much if you act properly now. First change any passwords that you gave out. Do it now. Don't read to the end of the answer do it now. Then call your bank, on a number you know is valid for them, not any number you were given after this communication, and not the number that called you. Tell them exactly what ...


8

This seems like it should be an easy fix. If the license doesn't match due to a typing error, then presumably most of the information would be correct, or close to correct, so viewing what they have side by side with your info should nearly line up. If not, then maybe the typo was in the credit ID- meaning that your information got assigned to a different ...


7

Unfortunately, the HR department is probably correct here. This is related to IRS Section 125 rules. Once you have finalized the enrollment, you cannot change it unless you have a 'qualifying event'. If you are employed and your employer offers insurance, loss of your husbands insurance is a qualifying event for you and you should be able to enroll with ...


6

Did I do anything wrong by cashing a check made out to "trustee of <401k plan> FBO ", and if so how can I fix it? I thought I was just getting a termination payout of the balance. Yes, you did. It was not made to you, and you were not supposed to even be able to cash it. Both you and your bank made a mistake - you made a mistake by depositing a check ...


6

Here's the detailed section of IRS Pub 590 It looks like you intended to have a "trustee to trustee conversion", but the receiving trustee dropped their ball. The bad news is, a "rollover contribution" needed to be done in 60 days of the distribution. There is good news, you can request an extension from the IRS, with one of the reasons if there was an ...


6

If you are convinced/sure its legit. Is doing a bank transfer to correct their mistake, actually the right way to do it in the first place? Best is to write to University and ask if this extra can be adjusted towards future payments. Not sure how much that is and would one or two future payments cover it off. The second best thing would be to ask if ...


6

This web page and comment by G&R Partners (a firm that provides payroll and benefits services to other companies, I'm not endorsing them, I found them in a web search) suggests that while an employer has no legal obligation to assist an employee after a benefits mistake, the IRS does allow some flexibility to correct mistakes: Legally, employers are ...


6

Is this the kind of thing to send an amended tax return over? No. If the error didn't result in more credit, it's because you've already gotten the maximum credit/benefit available to you. The IRS does indicate that people should file an amended return if they didn't claim the correct filing status or they need to change their income, deductions, or credits....


6

Note: I initially assumed that you were seeking a refund from your old insurance company, and my original answer is shown first. Below that, I have added a new section to address the clarification that you are seeking a refund from the new insurance company. Also, please understand that I am not necessarily an expert in health insurance, so my answer below ...


5

There's nothing your company can do to fix this. You have to pay the tax due directly to the IRS. If you had little or no income for the previous year, 2016 (and thus little or no total tax), then you won't owe any penalties or interest as long as you pay the full tax due for 2017 by April 17, 2018. If your withholding for 2017 was less than your total tax ...


5

In FL, you get a letter every year from the property tax man, which lists your applied exemptions and taxes, and it also lists a deadline for any changes. From what you wrote, it looks like you ignored the content for several years, and were charged accordingly higher property taxes. IANAL, but I would assume that by ignoring it, you lost this money ...


5

First, let me clear up a misunderstanding in your question. Is there a way to check with the IRS to see if they indeed receive my file as Exempt and if they did actually return it to my Employer? I’m just wondering if either HR forgot to follow up with me or even IF the IRS does actually cull these exempt requests in the first place? The W-4 form does ...


4

Confirming whether the payment was an error The simplest method is to confirm manually with the University whether the payment was a mistake and satisfy that between yourselves. If you're concerned it's fraudulant, I recommend calling the University finance office on a phone number you find on their website, or call one of the people you know. Reversing ...


4

This is an unfortunate situation for you. You have zero chance at your question number 1, if someone was going to bend this rule for you it would have happened already. The answer to question number 2 is pursue solution number 3. The overriding issue is that the IRS makes these rules, not the employer/plan sponsor or the administrator. You can't talk the ...


4

You need to obey whatever your accountant gave you for written advice. If you lost it, ask him for a copy of it. Why? When you retain a tax professional, and seek and follow her advice, then any penalties which arise out of following that advice are waived by the IRS. IRS nasty-grams are one of two things: Andover being Andover. Doesn't mean they ...


3

The absolute first thing you need to do is contact the bank. Also, do you have a copy of the loan papers you signed? You should look over those as soon as possible as well. I'm sure you want these payments going toward your FICO score and not your mothers.


3

Call in to the bank using a publicly available number to verify the request.


3

Quickly check the escrow balance with the new lender. What was supposed to happen is that the old lender would send the money they were holding in escrow to the new lender with information regarding how it was calculated, and what you should be charged each month. The new lender would continue servicing the escrow at the same monthly rate, until they did a ...


3

They are right to ask for the money back because you were not entitled to that money. However, you may have a defense called "laches". Basically, you can try to show that because of the government's unreasonable delay in asking for the money back, in the meantime you relied on the assumption that it was your money in good faith, and spent it, and now to ...


3

You shouldn't sign a return that you're not 100% sure to be correct. You're signing the return under penalties of perjury, keep that in mind. Since this is a State return, you can submit the Federal return separately, and wait with the State return until they figure the problem out. Or, you can do it manually on a PDF downloaded from here. You can use form ...


3

You should not knowingly submit a false tax return. This would expose you to criminal sanctions in addition to fines and penalties. Obviously, criminal charges would be extremely unlikely in this case given the software you are using. My advice to you is to wait and try to get this resolved to your satisfaction with hrblock.com. If you are unable to do so ...


3

Simply file an amended return to correct the mistake. This happens all the time and is a standard procedure that every legitimate tax pro can handle. You can work it out with the tax pro about whose mistake it was and who should pay for the additional service.


3

You should speak to HMRC about the correct way to unpick this. The ISA helpline number is 0300 200 3312.


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