Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
16

Mint.com uses something called OFX (Open Financial Exchange) to get the information in your bank account. If someone accessed your mint account they would not be able to perform any transactions with your bank. All they would be able to do is view the same information you do, which some of it could be personal <- that's up to you. Generally the weakest ...


11

Some banks allow mint.com read-only access via a separate "access code" that a customer can create. This would still allow an attacker to find out how much money you have and transaction details, and may have knowledge of some other information (your account number perhaps, your address, etc). The problem with even this read-only access is that many banks ...


7

This is just a case of Mint not categorizing correctly. You can simply recategorize the line items as "Transfer" in order for them to be considered neutral.


5

It depends on the bank and the transaction. Technically, as opposed to what MrChrister said, the credit card transaction doesn't necessarily get reported to your card issuer when it happens. Some transactions get authorized, and then you see them in the "pending" list, some don't. They post on your account when the transaction actually arrives to the issuer,...


4

With Mint you are without a doubt telling a third party your username and password. If mint gets compromised, or hires a bad actor, technically there isn't anything to stop shenanigans. You simply must be vigilant and be aware of your rights and the legal protections you have against fraud. For all the technical expertise and careful security they put in ...


4

I'm unclear on your exact setup. If you have a student loan that is both budgeted and a goal in Mint, you don't need it as a budget. Delete the budget item. If you want some student loan money to apply to a goal, and some to apply to a budget (eg, you have two different student loans, and one of them is a goal, etc), then that's problematic -- I don't ...


4

The interest is simply the charge or cost of borrowing the money, it is charged as a percentage rate of the outstanding amount of the loan. Loan Fees and Charges are usually a dollar amount (but can be expressed as a percentage) charged on the account. Examples could be Loan Establishment Fee, monthly Account Keeping Fees, and Dishonour Fee. Fees and ...


3

I think what you need to do is to break these up into minimum payments in the budget and extra payments as your goal. Based on your example: These would be budget items: CC min payment: 100 SL min payment: 250 Car min payment: 300 This would be a goal item: Debt Pay down Goal: 350 Although most would agree to do a fresh budget each and every month ...


3

Unfortunately, Mint cannot connect with TreasuryDirect to track savings bonds. But, you can manually add the value of the bonds as "other property" in Mint and update it manually on a monthly basis (when the value of the bonds change). You can get the value of the bonds directly from the TreasuryDirect website, or through their savings bond wizard ...


3

Try with the following in the search box notes:text that is being searched


3

Using the Transfer category is the best place to put these categories, as that accurately reflects what the transaction is. If you have your credit card and bank account linked in Mint, the debit and credit to both accounts will net to $0 in the category. I would not recommend using "Hide from budget and trends" as sometimes multiple (erroneous) ...


3

Converting fideli comment to answer I don't think any Canadian bank offers this capability for online banking. However, there seems to be a fierce push right now at most banks to improve their online banking platform so they may be open to the suggestion of guest accounts


3

In simple terms the credit card company has to decide to expose that data to you. They can decide to show pending transactions, or they can wait until the transaction is final. It can be debated if they have to approve each transaction, but they get to decide when you can see the transaction. You might be viewing the data on a webpage or on a mobile ...


2

Here's a very simple answer, ask your broker/bank. Mine uses ofx. When asked if they would reimburse me for any unauthorized activity, the answer was no. Simple enough, the banks that use it don't feel its secure enough.


2

Over time, you'll have more loans, maybe a few store cards, mortgage, car loan, etc. I'm a fan of maximizing one's wealth, and the small rebate/reward adds up over time, so I'm not against the store cards, so long as you always pay the bill in full. As far as FICO is concerned, what they 'like' to see may not necessarily be optimum for you. I'd suggest ...


2

If you're happy manually downloading transaction files from your bank and importing them into your desktop application, try You Need A Budget 4. It hits all three of your requirements. Here are the details about how to import from your bank I've been using YNAB for a few months now and am very impressed with it. It was cheap and it syncs to my mobile ...


2

A desktop application that has the same features (although as already stated, nothing will be identical but if you are looking for functionality then certainly there will be) and pretty simple to use was Microsoft Money, however, Microsoft stopped supporting it with newer versions and while the existing versions will work, I still use mine, there will be no ...


2

Take a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_accounting_software, in particular the rows with a market focus of 'personal'. This is probably one of the more complete lists available, and shows if they are web-based (like Mint) or standalone (like Quicken or Microsoft Money).


2

You can use Mint in Canada. According to this, Mint is not yet available outside of the U.S. and Canada.


2

The reason people like Mint is because it allows you to see all of your financial details in one place. When you create an account, you’re able to link all of your bank accounts, credit cards, and investment accounts. This linking enables Mint to update your transactions automatically. The catch is that you have to provide the username and password you use ...


2

Go to the listing of all your accounts on fidelity.com (not fidelityrewards.com) and click on the credit card account (such as Fidelity Rewards Visa Signature). On that screen, in the section titled Credit Card Snapshot, there's a link called Account Services. The first time you click it, you'll get a popup requesting that you enable Express Login. Once you ...


2

The way I do this is the same way I handle tax refunds. I just add a negative expense on the same category where I paid for the item. This effectively reduces your spending amount in that category by offsetting it.


1

I have a similar problem related to saving and investing. As with loan payments, setting up a budget and a Goal will double-pull from your budget. I also like using and tracking against the Goals feature, so I exclude my savings and Roth IRA "purchases" from my budget by categorizing them as transfers. Through some mental loopholes, this works for me. I'm ...


1

I had the same problem and found this KB was helpful! https://help.mint.com/Goals/888961391/How-do-I-exclude-goal-contributions-from-my-budget.htm Click the Budgets tab. Scroll to the bottom of the page, hover your mouse over the goal and click on Edit Details. Click "My contribution includes income from other sources" From here you can choose to exclude ...


1

I wound up asking Mint over email so I'll share the answer I received: Thank you for contacting Mint.com. From my understand you want to know if Mint can transfer data to other Intuit products and vice versa. Let me address your concern based from what I can see on my tools. Upon confirming, while Mint and other Intuit products are under ...


1

I personally like LearnVest. I use the free mobile app on iPhone 5 as well which allows you to view all of your transactions and you can select/change their categories and set budgets for each category. PersonalCapital has a mobile app as well that looks pretty slick but I have not tried it myself.


1

As others have pointed out, you can, but there's really no point in doing so given the other options available. Specifically, I'd recommend just using Google Sheets if you don't want to give out your banking information as it's easy to use, access, and develop great reports with. Additionally, you could upgrade over time to something like TillerHQ which is a ...


1

You can upgrade to Microsoft Money Plus Sunset for free. Also try PocketSense, a free software package which adds online-services features to Money Plus Sunset.


1

If you're willing to use OFX or QIF files, most Canadian banks can spit output more data than 90 days. The files are typically used to import into Quicken-like local programs, but can be easily parsed for your webapp, I imagine.


1

Yodlee and Mint are good solutions if you don't mind your personal financial information being stored "in the cloud". I do, so I use Quicken. Quicken stores whatever you give to it for as long as you want: so the only question is how to get the credit card transactions you want into it? All my financial institutions allow me to view my credit card ...


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