15

I hear you (and those answering) use the words "my money" (or "me to pay for stuff") The sooner that ends, the better off you'll both be. My wife and I do have our own checking accounts that we maintain so she can write a check without notifying me, or I can buy her a birthday/mother's day/ etc gift without it showing in the joint account, but nearly all ...


8

I'm not in the UK, but just a matter of observation: My wife was recently declined for a credit card based solely on the fact she is 6 months pregnant and will soon be on maternity leave. No, your wife was declined because her financial situation was presented as it would be negatively affected. She likely would have been declined if she said she was ...


7

FYI: Per the Family Medical Leave Act on 1993 (FMLA) most companies in the US (except small ones) are REQUIRED to give you maternity leave. They are not required, however, to pay you. You should also be aware of this eligibility proviso if she intends to switch companies: Employees must have worked at that company for at least 12 months. They also must ...


6

The pregnancy is a red herring as such, they have not declined you to do with the pregnancy, they have declined due to a expected decrease in income that takes you below the threshold required to get the loan. protected characteristics like pregnancy can't be used to discriminate, but your income is not a protected characteristic , and the protection doesn'...


4

My feeling on this is that anything to do with a child and raising a family has to be a joint effort. It is very rare that both of you will have exactly the same income, or the same time to spend into caring for your family, so work out what you can do. For us, I work 70+ hour weeks, my wife works 18 hour weeks. Far more of my money goes on clothes, kids, ...


3

In New Jersey, pregnancy and childbirth is considered a temporary disability covered under the state disability benefits. According to the New Jersey Temporary Disability Insurance FAQ, you have 30 days from the first day of disability to file a claim: Is there a time limit for filing a disability claim? Yes. You have 30 days from the first day of ...


2

I think the biggest thing you need in this situation is a budget/spending plan that you both agree on. Look at what your income is going to be and what expenses you'll have, and make cuts where needed. If it's important to you that she be able to spend some money on herself, then make sure there's a budget for it. Often, knowing that there's a plan that ...


2

Short term disability coverage will usually cover 40-60% of salary for 6 months. See if the employer offers a disability plan, or talk to the management about bringing in a company like Aflac or Unum that offers these benefits at little or no employer expense.


2

According to the IRS Section 125 document (clicking the link will download a PDF, then see paragraph c, which starts on page 15) the birth of a child is a "qualifying life event". Pregnancy does not entitle you to increase the total amount you contribute to your FSA, but you seem to know that. Maybe I missed something, but I've not found any IRS rules ...


2

At my company, you can make changes to your FSA within 30 days a "qualifying change in family status." That can include change in marital or partner status / employment, birth or death of a family member, starting or ending unpaid leave, etc. It is limited to two changes per calendar year. A worker could set a high total yearly value at the beginning of ...


1

As a US citizen, you will need to report this income on line 21 of your 1040 (Other income). As this maternity benefit is paid by the Serbian government and not your employer, it doesn't appear to qualify as foreign earned income, which the IRS describes as "wages, salaries, professional fees, and other compensation received for personal services you ...


1

She should probably stay in her current status as a full-time employee. In the scenario you described, working 8 months during pregnancy and being off 12 weeks, would yield at most an extra $1,500 over her current situation. But, she'd lose the security of the short term disability. At $1,500/mo, it'd only take her being out-of-work one month over the ...


1

The rate per paycheck you selected during open season is the rate that you have to work with until your next life event, or the next plan year. The IRS only lets you adjust the rate after these life events. Because of the 30 day window that the IRS gives you to make the change, you probably should file the paperwork while you are on maternity leave. Consult ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible