Hot answers tagged

88

Market reactions to information are not always timely, proportional, or rational. We don't know the full impact of our current situation; we're feeling it out. Some people (bulls), believe that the initial dip was an over-reaction, that the government response will prevent further decline, and/or that things will go back to normal pretty quickly, so they ...


61

If you do not understand the volatility of the fx market, you need to stop trading it, immediately. There are many reasons that fx is riskier than other types of investing, and you bear those risks whether you understand them or not. Below are a number of reasons why fx trading has high levels of risk: 1) FX trades on the relative exchange rate between ...


58

The market reacts only to new information. It is already known that the new coronavirus has resulted in a pandemic. It was known long before the current situation. Having infections in most countries, and knowing the growth is exponential is enough. Not all people understand the power of exponential growth and how quickly its rate increases. Yet, there are ...


52

No, a jump in market capitalization does not equal the amount that has been invested. Market cap is simply the stock price times the total number of shares. This represents a theoretical value of the company. I say "theoretical" because the company might not be able to be sold for that at all. The quoted stock price is simply what the last buyer and ...


38

Not sure why @Brick's answer was voted down; let me try to state it more precisely. maker Type 1 (seller): You tell the exchange that you want to sell at price P, but P is higher than the highest price at which any Type 2 maker is currently willing to buy. (You're demanding too much money in the eyes of everyone who's said they want to buy.) Type 2 (buyer)...


37

This is known as "Zone Pricing" or "Geographical Pricing". http://articles.latimes.com/2005/jun/19/business/fi-calprice19 Such price variations may seem odd, but they are not unique to Anaheim. On any given day, in any major U.S. city, a single brand of gasoline will sell for a wide range of prices even when the cost to make and deliver the fuel is the ...


16

You seem to think that stock exchanges are much more than they actually are. But it's right there in the name: stock exchange. It's a place where people exchange (i.e. trade) stocks, no more and no less. All it does is enable the trading (and thereby price finding). Supposedly they went into mysterious bankruptcy then what will happen to the listed ...


15

Location, Location, Location. The closer to the highway, the more they can charge. People want to go less than a mile from the exit to get gas. Therefore they save time, but spend more money. That is understandable, so the gas station takes advantage of the situation.


14

As you are asking specifically for Kraken, here is what I found: What is ​Maker vs Taker? A trade gets the ​taker​ fee if the trade order is matched immediately against an order already on the order book, which is ​removing liquidity​. A trade gets the ​maker​ fee if the trade order is not matched immediately against an order already on the ...


14

In simple terms, the value of a stock represents the total value of: Adding up the assets (the things it owns) Subtracting the liabilities (the things it owes) Adding the present value of all the predicted future income streams. Present value means that you look at all the future years' predicted income, and discount it to make up for the fact that you have ...


12

The "price" is the price of the last transaction that actually took place. According to Motley Fool wiki: A stock price is determined by what was last paid for it. During market hours (usually weekdays from 9:30AM-4:00PM eastern), a heavily traded issue will see its price change several times per second. A stock's price is, for many purposes, considered ...


11

Stock A last traded at $100. Stock A has 1 million shares outstanding. Stock A's market cap is $100 million. No seller is willing to sell Stock A for less than $110 a share. One buyer is willing to buy 1 share for $110. The order executes. The buyer pays the seller $110. Stock A's new price is $110. Stock A's market cap is now $110 million. An $110 ...


9

I'd add, this is actually the way any stock opens every day, i.e. the closing price of the prior day is what it is, but the opening price will reflect whatever news there was prior to the day's open. If you watch the business news, you'll often see that some stock has an order imbalance and has not opened yet, at the normal time. So, as Geo stated, those who ...


8

I only have anecdotal evidence here as members of my family used to own a grocery store / gas station, but they were often time charged much more to have the gasoline delivered to than many gas stations which were just a mile or two away (up to 15% more). Also depending upon the branding of the gas station, they are required to use certain distributors (i.e....


7

GENIX was started by Joel Greenblatt back in 2013, so it is a real life test of the strategy. GENIX got off to a great start in 2013 and 2014 (probably because investors were pumping money into the fund) but had a terrible 2015, and lagging in 2016. Since inception it has under-performed an S&P 500 index fund by about 1.90% per year. The expense ratio ...


7

When I ran a gas station, our price was largely set by our neighbors-- the other gas stations in the area. We couldn't go below the current cost of replacement gas, but other than that we wanted to be at .05 over the average. (We got away with charging more because we were the last station on a major road.) Everybody else did the same thing. Also, we only ...


7

There is no unique identifier that exists to identify specific shares of a stock. Just like money in the bank, there is no real reason to identify which exact dollar bills belong to me or you, so long as there is a record that I own X bills and I can access them when I want. (Of course, unlike banks, there is still a 1:1 relationship between the amount I ...


7

Go to a large reference library and ask to see the Wall Street Journal for October 13 1992.


7

You need to hope that a fund exists targeting the particular market segment you are interested in. For example, searching for "cloud computing ETF" throws up one result. You'd then need to read all the details of how it invests to figure out if that really matches up with what you want - there'll always be various trade-offs the fund manager has to make. ...


7

No, you shouldn't wait for a crash. What if the crash doesn't come? What if the stocks you're interested in aren't specifically affected by a crash? What if what's considered a crash by others doesn't meet your criteria and you miss out? If it was that simple a concept, why doesn't everyone wait for a crash and then buy? How is your money being invested and ...


7

Most certainly there are such a thing as dual-listed or interlisted stocks. These are often exactly the same class of stock, but quoted on more than one exchange — and sometimes even in a different currency. Arbitrageurs can sometimes take advantage of differences in quotes and exchange rates. Here's list of Canadian Interlisted Companies including "...


6

Market makers make the spread on market orders, only. A market order is one in which the retail buyer/seller says fill the order immediately at whatever is the best price. The market maker is buying the market-sells at the bid and selling the market-buys at the ask. If the market-buy volume equals the market-sell volume then the market maker is just ...


6

In an IPO (initial public offering) or APO (additional public offering) situation, a small group of stakeholders (as few as one) basically decide to offer an additional number of "shares" of equity in the company. Usually, these "shares" are all equal; if you own one share you own a percentage of the company equal to that of anyone else who owns one share. ...


6

At the most fundamental level, every market is comprised of buyers and selling trading securities. These buyers and sellers decide what and how to trade based on the probability of future events, as they see it. That's a simple statement, but an example demonstrates how complicated it can be. Picture a company that's about to announce earnings. Some ...


6

In order for a commodity to be offered as a future, the exact specifications must be specified by the exchange. This includes not only the particular grade, strain, etc (depending on what we are talking about) but also the exact delivery location (otherwise transportation costs is an issue as you noticed). Once there is a standardized contract, the ...


6

Who are the losers going to be? If you can tell me for certain which firms will do worst in a bear market and can time it so that this information is not already priced into the market then you can make money. If not don't try. In a bull market stocks tend to act "normally" with established patterns such as correlations acting as expected and stocks more or ...


6

As of this moment the DOW 30 is up 6.92% Year-to-date. Of the 30 stocks in the index 6 are in negative territory for the year. And of the 6 in negative territory 3 are farther below 0 than the average is above 0. The investors in those 3 stocks (Boeing, Goldman Sachs and Nike) would look at this year so far as a disaster. Individual stocks can move in ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible