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Trying to succeed at something that you are unfamiliar with is a daunting proposition and AFAIC, investing based on the advice of anonymous strangers on the web isn't the best approach. My generic advice would be to start the process of becoming financially literate. To do so, start by reading beginner level introductory material. There are a lot of "XYZ ...


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I'm planning to exit my personal plan and only depend on my company's group plan to save some bucks as they are almost identical to each other. But I am worried that it could bring dire consequences especially when I left the company in regards to my health protection. As you already have a personal plan, it is advisable to keep it. Generally the Company's ...


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You should first take into account your living expense in other country by using some online living expense estimator.(for example, https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/estimator_main ) Then do some simple math to calculate the amount based on your home country currency. Apart from that, you may want to put the rest of your salary into your Canadian account....


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A quick update for people finding this thread through Google. With the help of a few awesome Bogleheads, I compiled all the relevant research done into two Wiki articles: Nonresident alien taxation Nonresident alien with no US tax treaty & Irish ETFs This includes comparing US to Irish domiciled ETFs, how to calculate tax withholding leakage and estate ...


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Here're some findings upon researches: Two main things to watch out for: Estate tax and the 30% tax withholding. These 2 could be get around by investing in Luxembourg or Ireland domiciled ETF. For instance there's no tax withholding on Ireland domiciled ETF dividend, and the estate tax is not as high. (source: BogleHead forums) Some Vanguard ETF offered ...


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It looks like there is no tax treaty between Malaysia and the US. Therefore: If the treaty does not cover a particular kind of income, or if there is no treaty between your country and the United States, you must pay tax on the income in the same way and at the same rates shown in the instructions for the applicable U.S. tax return. -- Trying hard to ...


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This page from TripAdvisor may be of interest. Look at what fees are charged on your ATM cards and credit cards, and consider overpaying your credit card so you have a credit balance that you can draw on for cash "advances" from ATMs that will dispense in local currency. Depending on what fees your bank charges, you may get a better rate than the forex cash ...


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Post 2008, the companies registered in Malaysia are required to deduct the taxes on dividends and then distribute it to shareholders. The dividend received in the hands of shareholder is tax free.


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Yes, it is possible. According to "Early Withdrawal of Benefits - MPFA", you can claim your MPF earlier than the age of 65 with one of the following reasons: Early retirement (60 years old or above) Permanent departure from Hong Kong (can only be used once in a lifetime) Total incapacity Small balance account Death Seems the first two options might fit ...


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You should ask the people at MPFA; their FAQ does not address your situation directly, but one answer suggests that you could have claimed your accrued benefits when you left, maybe you can use the same procedure now. You probably can claim them now just as if you were still living in Hong Kong, but note that regular retirement is only at age 65, though you ...


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Is your employer willing to pay you in MYR (Ringgit) at reasonable exchange rates? Meaning are you happy with the exchange mechanism they're going to use when splitting your salary? If not, you may be better off focusing on a reliable, low-cost foreign exchange mechanism of your own where you'd be paid fully in CAD (because that's your long term home plans)...


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