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1

It depends on the conditions attached to your order. If you place an All Or None (AON) limit order and there aren't enough shares to fill your order at your price then there is no trade execution. If it's a limit order without the AON stipulation then you get whatever number of shares are available at your limit price and the rest of your order will only be ...


0

A stop (limit) sell order means "execute this order if the price goes below X". For a sell, that price is the bid. So your stop at 0.35 would be executed. That would then create a limit sell which means sell at any price higher than Y. So your stop order would create a limit sell at 0.35 which would likely be filled since that's the current ask. ...


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The bid is the lower price and the ask is the higher price so someone has made a typo. A sell stop-limit order combines a stop order and a limit order. If the stop price is reached, a limit order is triggered to execute at a specified price or better. Your question only contains one price so I'm wondering if you meant a limit order to sell rather than a ...


1

You have a fundamental misunderstanding of how exchanges work. The "share price" is not the price you can buy or sell at. It is just the price at which the last transaction was executed. At any point in time, there is a list of people who want to buy those shares, each with a maximum quantity and a maximum price. And there is another list of people ...


0

IT depends on the order book and which exchange. If it closed at 10 and it looks set to open at 9 your broker should fill it close to that opening price. A NYSE specialist would fill your order at 10 by shorting it and immediately buy it at 9 hoping there won't be a complaint.


4

The idea of a stock having a concrete price at any given moment in time is a description of the stock market, not a fundamental reality. When you say things like: From my understanding, my limit order is run/executed in any case since I made a limit order at x, and the share price must be a continuous function. The cases x<y and y<x at the instance of ...


8

the share price must be a continuous function Even if this were true, at least 17.5 hours pass between the close and the next open in US stock markets. The "true" price can change throughout this time. Sometimes the price remains visible, as with after-hours and pre-market trading. Sometimes the price is not quoted but people's views on the stock ...


35

From my understanding, my limit order is run/executed in any case since I made a limit order at x, and the share price must be a continuous function. The cases x<y and y<x at the instance of market opening can not occur since that would mean that the value can be arbitrary at market opening. No, share prices do not have to be continuous, and the ...


6

The market is an auction and a security's price is determined by supply and demand. If there is a order imbalance (net excess buy or sell volume), overnight price will change. This may occur during after hours trading and if there is none, at the open of regular hours trading. If you place a limit order at X, you'll be filled at X if the security trades at ...


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