78

From a long-term planning point of view, is the bump in salary worth not having a 401(k)? In this case, absolutely. At $30k/year, the 4% company match comes to about $1,200 per year. To get that you need to save $1,200 yourself, so your gross pay after retirement contributions is about $28,800. Now you have an offer making $48,000. If you take the new ...


34

In my experience of doing software development for a little longer than I care to remember, salaries are always assumed to be negotiable. I know you said you don't like haggling (a lot of people don't) but you'll have to get used to that and you might have to be a little more flexible. Being able to negotiate something as important as your salary is a very ...


31

4% of 30k ($1,200) is dwarfed by an $18,000 base pay increase. At 48k maxing out IRA will take ~11.5% of gross income, so at current position (30k salary) 401k contributions would likely be limited to the matching portion anyway. The long-term benefit of a deferred tax retirement plan can't fully be known since tax rates can change over time. If rates ...


13

It is possible for an employer to check your credit score and it is legal. As long as you give them permission. You have every right to refuse BUT the employer also has the right to not give you a job. The reason is to get an overall feeling for your integrity, discipline, and lifestyle. People in debt are more likely to embezzle, etc. A low credit score ...


13

This is scam. No one offers commission for a purchase manager. Once you start communicating there are different ways this will proceed. All of them you will lose money


11

What's relevant to whether you accept the offer should be the compensation package (including salary and benefits) they're offering, the work you'll be doing, and the conditions in which you'll be doing it. The communication history between you and the recruiter isn't really that relevant, since you probably won't deal with the recruiter once you're hired. ...


10

The direct answer to your specific question Can I negotiate salary after mentioning a desired range Is certainly yes - no problem. Sure, the language you would use is this: "Now that we know the details of the job, can we discuss salary? What were you thinking on your end? Looking at the market, I'd want to make no less than $___ plus family ...


9

From a psychological standpoint, the more desperate someone is to achieve X, the harder it is to convince them that a particular way to achieve X will not work. This is sometimes observed with people that have a terminal illness. Someone will try to sell them a new kind of (snake oil) treatment that might cure them, and even though everyone around them knows ...


8

I was able to request a modest advance on my salary when I started my first job out of college, for essentially the same reason. Alternatively, you might consider requesting a small personal loan from friends or family. If you have a credit card that can cover things like grocery expenses for that period, this may also be the appropriate time to use it. Buy ...


8

Some check as part of a background investigation. Money problems can make it hard to establish a level of trust. If your credit is bad you might be easy to bribe. Or you might steal from the company. The level of importance will depend on the job you are applying for, or for the customer you will be working for. Government jobs or government contracts ...


8

Why not just tell the truth? If they ask, "How much are you making now?", say, "Well, as of today I'm making 20k, but I've been promised a raise to 25k effective next month" (or whatever the details are). This tells them that if you stay where you are, you know you will be getting 25k, so if they want you to work for them, they either have to offer more than ...


7

You can, but I wouldn't. Take the job, you need the work per your question. You did not mention this but I feel like you have been looking for a job for quite some time. Currently tech is very hot. If it remains so, you can jump ship or negotiate a higher rate (if they like you) in 18 months or so. This will probably yield far more than the 7500 or ...


7

So you've already considered relocation. Here are a few additional things to consider with respect to negotiating a signing bonus (if any): Would you be leaving a position where you are eligible for an upcoming bonus, profit-share, or other special incentive payout, such as a stock option or RSU vesting date? A signing bonus can help offset the opportunity ...


7

It makes sense that a credit score is a history of how you have handled monetary commitments. It allows the employer another method of evaluating you. Whether it provides useful information to the employer is another question. It may give them an idea of if you make risky decisions, take on too much at one time, or if you are able to repay on time. From my ...


7

You asked about a signing bonus and were told the conditions that would be required to get one. It does not appear that you will qualify, but you do have another option. Ask if you can start earlier. Some times they can't change the start date. They might have a contractual issue with the customer and the customer is setting the start date. Other times they ...


7

Yes, this is a scam. Most likely, it involves either helping them transport stolen merchandise (a so-called reshipping scam), laundering money somehow, or utilizing stolen credit cards. The pay structure they're offering is both highly unusual for a legitimate purchasing agent job (no one pays commission for that kind of a job) and far above the average ...


5

The best source is the employers themselves: multiple interested employers. If your goal is to maximize the size of the offer, you'll need multiple employers bidding. When you get a first offer, try to hold out giving a response until a second one (or more) arrives. Take the top offer and ask the currently losing bids to top it. Repeat until you don't get ...


5

Two "data sources" I've used: Former coworkers I've kept in touch with, especially if they're now working as hiring managers for the type of job I'm seeking. A quick call to them, and they'll usually provide the range you can expect to see. Recruiters. There are several recruiters that I've been in occasional contact with for several years. None of them ...


4

Assuming the numbers work out roughly the same (and you can frankly whip up a spreadsheet to prove that out), a defined benefit scheme that pays out an amount equal to an annuitized return from a 401(k) is better. The reason is not monetary - it is that the same return is being had at less risk. Put another way, if your defined benefit was guaranteed to be $...


4

The legalese on those two you posted look pretty standard. The big change I saw is that on the second, the vesting after the first year is monthly, whereas the first one is yearly through the whole 4 years. Everything else being equal, the second option would be preferable, because you have a bit more flexibility if you want to sell them at some point. ...


4

If she does take this job and not have a 401k, tell her to make sure she opens up an IRA account. It has a lower contribution limit ($5,500 a year for people under 55) and no sort of company matching, but has the same tax benefits a 401k has. It's definitely a wise investment if she doesn't have access to a 401k (still a wise investment even if she does)


4

You can tell him this: No recruiter in any Western country takes money from the employee. It's always the hiring company that pays, without any exception. In some countries, like China, there are recruiters that charge the employees. However, even though this is unscrupulous, they charge when you start the job. No job, no fee. No legitimate recruiter ...


3

Is there anything I need to ask or consider during my negotiation process based on the fact that they probably will soon be own by another company? Very tricky situation. You are being hired by one company, and one hiring manager. But you already know that there are big changes ahead. What you don't know is how all those changes will actually play out. ...


3

First question. Normally one has 2 weeks vacation per year. One month every 2 years is then normal. But they give you 2 months vacation, one will be paid, the other no. As if you would be paid 700$ a month on vacation. Second question. So you will have one year with no vacation, the other year with a long vacation. Every 2 years you will have 2 months off, ...


3

This situation sounds better than most, the company it seems likely to be profitable in the future. As such it is a good candidate to have a successful IPO. With that your stock options are likely to be worth something. How much of that is your share is likely to be very small. The workers that have been their since the beginning, the venture ...


3

Splitting the payments does have one short time effect, the initial withholding may be lower. Lets say the bonus is $20,000 and they make $60,000 a year. If the company treats it as a lump sum they may withhold 25% for federal taxes. This would mean that $5000 would be withheld right away. It would not matter if the friend was single, married, head of ...


3

Signing bonuses are probably the most variable of all, as there is a general understanding that more personal factors are taken into account. As a result, HR isn't under a huge obligation to explain away the differences. In comparison, for salary there's the wide expectation that same job = same pay. Since there's so variable, but also fairly rare, "budget" ...


2

If you take less than you think you are worth, you will hate that job with a purple passion in short order. Either make peace with the amount you settle on or move on.


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