88

An interview for a job as an Executive Assistant should be performed in an office. Having it in an apartment is a big fat red flag.


78

From a long-term planning point of view, is the bump in salary worth not having a 401(k)? In this case, absolutely. At $30k/year, the 4% company match comes to about $1,200 per year. To get that you need to save $1,200 yourself, so your gross pay after retirement contributions is about $28,800. Now you have an offer making $48,000. If you take the new ...


32

The iron rule is: 1. Any scammer will at some point ask for money. 2. No real company that offers you a real job will ever ask you for money. So as soon as they are asking for money, you know one hundred million billion percent sure it is a scam. We know 100% sure that it is a scam from your description, but Riley has his/her greedy little eyes on the ...


31

4% of 30k ($1,200) is dwarfed by an $18,000 base pay increase. At 48k maxing out IRA will take ~11.5% of gross income, so at current position (30k salary) 401k contributions would likely be limited to the matching portion anyway. The long-term benefit of a deferred tax retirement plan can't fully be known since tax rates can change over time. If rates ...


27

I've heard about things like this before. The job itself was real enough, but the actual work turned out to be connecting calls for a black market network (i.e. drug runners, etc). It paid well enough, but then the person ended up going to jail for supporting the illegal activities (c.f. Alice Marie Johnson). My advice, if it sounds too good to be true, ...


13

It is possible for an employer to check your credit score and it is legal. As long as you give them permission. You have every right to refuse BUT the employer also has the right to not give you a job. The reason is to get an overall feeling for your integrity, discipline, and lifestyle. People in debt are more likely to embezzle, etc. A low credit score ...


13

This is scam. No one offers commission for a purchase manager. Once you start communicating there are different ways this will proceed. All of them you will lose money


13

None of these per se are red flags, but the combination of them seems odd. No requirements is quite possible for an assistant whose job is basically to help out with everything that lands on his/her desk. Typically, job experience is requested, but very often chemistry between the assistant and the person he/she is assisting is the key, so they might have ...


12

From a psychological standpoint, the more desperate someone is to achieve X, the harder it is to convince them that a particular way to achieve X will not work. This is sometimes observed with people that have a terminal illness. Someone will try to sell them a new kind of (snake oil) treatment that might cure them, and even though everyone around them knows ...


10

The direct answer to your specific question Can I negotiate salary after mentioning a desired range Is certainly yes - no problem. Sure, the language you would use is this: "Now that we know the details of the job, can we discuss salary? What were you thinking on your end? Looking at the market, I'd want to make no less than $___ plus family ...


8

Why not just tell the truth? If they ask, "How much are you making now?", say, "Well, as of today I'm making 20k, but I've been promised a raise to 25k effective next month" (or whatever the details are). This tells them that if you stay where you are, you know you will be getting 25k, so if they want you to work for them, they either have to offer more than ...


8

Some check as part of a background investigation. Money problems can make it hard to establish a level of trust. If your credit is bad you might be easy to bribe. Or you might steal from the company. The level of importance will depend on the job you are applying for, or for the customer you will be working for. Government jobs or government contracts ...


8

You can tell him this: No recruiter in any Western country takes money from the employee. It's always the hiring company that pays, without any exception. In some countries, like China, there are recruiters that charge the employees. However, even though this is unscrupulous, they charge when you start the job. No job, no fee. No legitimate recruiter ...


7

You can, but I wouldn't. Take the job, you need the work per your question. You did not mention this but I feel like you have been looking for a job for quite some time. Currently tech is very hot. If it remains so, you can jump ship or negotiate a higher rate (if they like you) in 18 months or so. This will probably yield far more than the 7500 or ...


7

It makes sense that a credit score is a history of how you have handled monetary commitments. It allows the employer another method of evaluating you. Whether it provides useful information to the employer is another question. It may give them an idea of if you make risky decisions, take on too much at one time, or if you are able to repay on time. From my ...


7

You asked about a signing bonus and were told the conditions that would be required to get one. It does not appear that you will qualify, but you do have another option. Ask if you can start earlier. Some times they can't change the start date. They might have a contractual issue with the customer and the customer is setting the start date. Other times they ...


7

So you've already considered relocation. Here are a few additional things to consider with respect to negotiating a signing bonus (if any): Would you be leaving a position where you are eligible for an upcoming bonus, profit-share, or other special incentive payout, such as a stock option or RSU vesting date? A signing bonus can help offset the opportunity ...


7

Yes, this is a scam. Most likely, it involves either helping them transport stolen merchandise (a so-called reshipping scam), laundering money somehow, or utilizing stolen credit cards. The pay structure they're offering is both highly unusual for a legitimate purchasing agent job (no one pays commission for that kind of a job) and far above the average ...


7

This happened to my wife. She was being interviewed for a position as a technician at a laboratory. That was what the ad was for. However, the person doing the hiring held the follow up or initial interview (don't recall) at a flat, and started presenting her with some pyramid/multi-level marketing scheme (something like Amway, but not Amway, something dodgy ...


7

This sounds VERY similar to a known scam, where someone can "work from home" and is given an "expense account" to buy office supplies with. Here's how the scam typically works: The fake company sends a check that they know will bounce to the victim, typically for more money than is reasonable (~$10,000 is common), and tells the victim to purchase office ...


6

It sounds like a scam, but apparently Riley doesn't want to hear it from you. If all else fails and you know Riley is about to quit her current job and accept the new one, unless you're worried that she could end up being harmed, perhaps you could propose this: Riley accepts the new job offer and begins working. She doesn't tell her current job she is ...


5

The best source is the employers themselves: multiple interested employers. If your goal is to maximize the size of the offer, you'll need multiple employers bidding. When you get a first offer, try to hold out giving a response until a second one (or more) arrives. Take the top offer and ask the currently losing bids to top it. Repeat until you don't get ...


5

Two "data sources" I've used: Former coworkers I've kept in touch with, especially if they're now working as hiring managers for the type of job I'm seeking. A quick call to them, and they'll usually provide the range you can expect to see. Recruiters. There are several recruiters that I've been in occasional contact with for several years. None of them ...


5

Everything moved very fast, the initial contact to job offer happened in a week. This, to me, is beyond red flag territory and more like a blaring foghorn. Was the offer contingent on a background check? Because if it wasn't I cannot imagine any way for this to be a legitimate opportunity. No one hires an executive assistant without dotting i's and ...


5

I agree with all the other reasons why this doesn't sound legit, ranging from best case scam of some commission based sales job ('by selling X from home you get 2% commission so easy to earn up to a million a month!') to the much worse 'scam' possibilities. One 'scam' option that wasn't mentioned happend to a friend of a friend of mine: lots of detailed ...


4

Assuming the numbers work out roughly the same (and you can frankly whip up a spreadsheet to prove that out), a defined benefit scheme that pays out an amount equal to an annuitized return from a 401(k) is better. The reason is not monetary - it is that the same return is being had at less risk. Put another way, if your defined benefit was guaranteed to be $...


4

The legalese on those two you posted look pretty standard. The big change I saw is that on the second, the vesting after the first year is monthly, whereas the first one is yearly through the whole 4 years. Everything else being equal, the second option would be preferable, because you have a bit more flexibility if you want to sell them at some point. ...


4

If she does take this job and not have a 401k, tell her to make sure she opens up an IRA account. It has a lower contribution limit ($5,500 a year for people under 55) and no sort of company matching, but has the same tax benefits a 401k has. It's definitely a wise investment if she doesn't have access to a 401k (still a wise investment even if she does)


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