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It seems like there are some exceptions where you can apply for an ITIN without a tax return: 1. you get third-party witholding on passive income, 2. a third party reports your mortgage interest 3. you're a member or owner of an LLC business, 4. you're exempt under the rules of Treasury Decision 9363 5. you've profited from the sale of property in the U.S. 6....


1

First, the administrator of a qualified plan (or IRA) does not 'apply' any tax, including the 10% 'penalty' for early distribution. The adminstrator does specify codes on the 1099-R for the distribution(s) such as: 1—Early distribution, no known exception (...) 2—Early distribution, exception applies (...) Note the "known". Exceptions to 72(t) ...


0

You’d need to check the exact wording of the relevant law: Did you have to pay before or not later than the deadline? How precise is the payment date recorded? It might be stored rounded To the nearest minute, so they only have proof you paid from 30 seconds before to 30 seconds after the deadline. Charging you means you will certainly complain, which will ...


2

I wouldn't bother. If you are going to file the 1040-X reasonably soon -- within a month, or two at most -- just pay the tax then, either by including a check or making the electronic payment. Since the interest you at least nominally owe is computed starting from the filing deadline, which was delayed due to COVID, it will only be about 10 or 20 cents. I ...


21

It certainly seems like they could consider this late, but that's really up to them to decide if they want to hold you to the second or not. If they do, however, consider appealing the fee. From the IRS page on penalties: The IRS may abate your penalties for filing and paying late if you can show reasonable cause and that the failure wasn't due to willful ...


3

As long as you used one of the IRS approved methods from a private delivery service by the deadline date they will count it as timely mailing. Taxpayers or Tax Professionals can use certain private delivery services designated by the IRS to meet the "timely mailing as timely filing/paying" rule for tax returns and payments. These private delivery ...


4

From the IRS (emphasis added): Your return is considered filed on time if the envelope is properly addressed, has enough postage, is postmarked, and is deposited in the mail by the due date. If you file electronically, the date and time in your time zone when your return is transmitted controls whether your return is filed timely. You will later receive an ...


1

I don't know anything about Wyoming law, but I'm fairly certain that the only consequence is that the IRS will treat your business as a hobby and you would not be able to deduct losses. Perhaps there are similar tax provisions in Wyoming state law. States like Wyoming are generally happy to receive your annual fees. A business that isn't doing anything ...


1

To the best of my knowledge, spouses cannot file an MFJ return on Form 1040 electronically if either or both spouses have filed an MFS return already. What the spouses can do is spelled out on page 10 of the Instructions for Form 1040X which says You are changing from separate to a joint return. If you and your spouse are changing from separate returns to a ...


1

No. If you make a payment online you're done. The only other form you'd use for an estimated tax payment is the Form 1040-ES payment voucher, and they say: File only if you are making a payment of estimated tax by check or money order.


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Yes, you are considered a resident alien the whole year by default. You are a resident alien because you pass the Substantial Presence Test for the year. There are Last Year of Residency rules in which you can elect to have your residency termination date changed to when you left the US, but that is something you have to elect and attach a signed statement ...


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TLDR: As you probably know what your earnings/taxes are for the two tax quarters, I would apply two quarters worth of taxes to the earliest period. Nothing wrong with one for each quarter. As long as the IRS gets the payments they are due, that is what matters. My rational is that any excess estimated payment become equivalent to rolling over any excess ...


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