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38

You could ask, but you risk the seller deciding to just cancel and put the property back on the market once restrictions lift, shutting you out. Depending on the exact neighborhood and local market, there is no guarantee that a recession will even affect the chosen neighborhood. You described it as a very competitive, presumably it will still be a desirable ...


22

With the caveat that I'm assuming your verbal agreement isn't legally binding (AIG says it isn't), I would pull out of the deal completely if I were in your shoes. By negotiating, you're essentially trying to price an unprecedented global financial/economic meltdown. What is the right haircut to the existing price? 5%? 10%? 50%? Are you looking for a ...


19

If you've already signed a contract, it's too late. Well, barring legal shenanigans. If you haven't signed a contract, then sure, you can ask. That's how negotiations work. The buyer comes up with reasons why he should pay less, the seller gives reasons why he should pay more. I wouldn't expect asking for a lower price to derail the sale. The seller could ...


12

My wife and I run a real estate brokerage in Florida. The transaction process is different here but principles are similar. I think there's a good chance the deal will fall apart if you try to renegotiate the price at this stage. Buyers and sellers in residential real estate transactions often make emotional decisions. Don't be surprised if the seller ...


8

I can think of a couple of options for you. One would be to write a letter to Acting Garda Commissioner Ó Cualáin, the head of the Garda Síochána. The address of headquarters is An Garda Síochána Headquarters, Phoenix Park, Dublin 8, D08 HN3X. Another option is to contact the Garda Síochána Ombudsman Commission (GSOC), an independent agency that addresses ...


7

Assuming that this was a direct sign up to donate to Save the Children via text, and not via some third party broker or agent, then Save the Children get 100% of your donation. They have the details on their website: What happens when I sign up? You'll be charged £3 or £5 plus the cost of one standard rate text message in the first month and we'll ...


7

To put this in perspective: you can certainly set up a corporation and then pass legitimate business expenses related to the operation of that corporation through it in the manner you're describing. Or take whatever other steps are needed in your specific jurisdiction in order to take advantage of tax breaks for legitimate business expenses. In a sense, that ...


7

Recession (and the related risks and uncertainties) goes both ways. If the real estate marked drops significantly and doesn't recover quickly, you will have overpaid if you buy at the agreed price. It would indeed be reasonable to ask for a price reduction and cancel the deal if you don't get one. If the government decides to counter the economic recession ...


5

If you can still walk away from the deal, particularly without having paid any deposit, your leverage is a willingness to cancel the deal. In the US you usually only risk deposit money until you have a deed and mortgage. Are you sincerely concerned enough about the housing market changing that you will cancel the deal? Supposing you are actually seriously ...


5

This answer applies only to corporation tax, not income tax. Different things, income tax is much higher. 12.5% is the low rate for corporation tax. The standard rate is 25%. Or if you're Apple 0%. Like many countries Ireland will only consider you eligible for the low rate of corporation tax if you (your Irish company) can demonstrably prove yourself ...


3

According to the Irish Revenue board, the taxing period is between 1 January to 31 December so a person who received any income within that period for any year is taxable. Tax credits come into consideration after that of course. So in your case, it would be for the financial year of 2013. You may refer to -> http://www.revenue.ie/en/tax/it/leaflets/it11....


3

And I messaged my broker who responded: Thank you for your enquiry. Irish domiciled ETFs on the LSE are stamp exempt so you do not have to pay the 1% duty. (previously I had called the and the lady on the phone said I have to pay it) Also, I found this page which lists ETFs as exceptions for which stamp duty is not payable: http://www....


2

These horror stories are true. It depends on the countries involved and the treaties between them. You'll have to talk to tax accountants in Canada and in Ireland who are also well-versed in the Irish-Canadian tax treaty (if such exists). You may end up paying taxes in two countries for periods where you only live in one or the other. You may even end up ...


2

I am in the UK. The basic rule that I have is to never accept a renewal quote for house or car. I can always save an appreciable amount by switching insurers each year. I often just swap between two companies taking the new customer discount each time. This website shows how to get cheap insurance in the UK but the methods will probably work in other ...


2

[Note: I have no sources to cite to prove this. This is from personal and friends experience over many years and multiple insurances] From my experience, most car insurance companies offer low rates when you are considering becoming a customer, and then raise them every year steeply (10-20%). As a result, after two or three years, you overpay significantly (...


2

This link suggests the different rates are for: 12.5% : normal income. 25% : passive income (e.g. dividends, royalties, etc.) So both your Irish and Italian client income should be taxed at 12.5%, unless you are charging royalties as part of your service.


2

Transferring money you own from one place to another pretty much never has tax implications. It might have other implications, including requirement to report it. Being a US citizen has tax implications, including the requirement to file US tax forms for the rest of eternity.


2

Since you are buying a house, you will have been watching closely the housing market recently. Go back and look at some of the other properties you considered that are still unsold. Has their asking price gone up or down? The housing market is entirely capitalist so have no shame in following the fundamental capitalist ethos of supply and demand. If demand ...


1

That sounds like a real pain. If I were in your shoes, I would try contacting the relevant regulatory body/consumer protection agency, which in this case, I believe, are one and the same: https://www.centralbank.ie/consumer-hub/explainers/how-do-i-complain-about-a-financial-services-firm Although I'm not sure how much attention you're going to receive ...


1

You should report it. The tax man will come for you if you're found to have been cheating. What happens if you don't file, but then you forgot that you actually made an extra 1000 that year? The government will take that and more out of your hide for cheating them. The majority of investing firms will automatically generate the relevant tax reporting ...


1

Your Q suggests you don't know but as a US citizen you remain subject to US tax -- even if resident elsewhere, and even if you have other (dual) citizenship. US is notoriously the only major country whose tax system works this way. The only way you get out of the US tax system is to renounce or lose your citizenship -- and if you do that with moderately high ...


1

Having freelanced myself in South America I could give you a sound advice BUT you would first need to answer some questions. 1) How long do you plan on being in South America? At the end of 2017 will you be back in Ireland or still being in South America? In other words was is your country of residence for tax purposes on Dec. 31 2017 ? That is the key ...


1

Making or losing income (via selling shares) is the taxable event, not moving the income you made to and from an account. The only exception would be a special account such as an IRA, and then there would be rules specific to that account structure about when you can withdraw money and what the tax consequences are.


1

In the US, the first $5,000,000 from an estate is tax-free, including gifts given over the lifetime of the recipient beyond around $14,000 per recipient per year (that number changes every year). Assuming your uncle didn't have millions of dollars, then, you likely did not owe estate tax. However, since this was from a retirement account, the money was ...


1

There contracts called an FX Forwards where you can get a feel for what the market thinks an exchange rate will be in the future. Now exchange rates are notoriously uncertain, but it is worth noting that at current prices market believes your Krona will be worth only 0.0003 Euro less three years from now than it is worth now. So, if you are considering ...


1

To my knowledge the US is the only country to tax people according to their citizenship. Canada does not. Ireland?? Yes you will continue to be taxed in Canada. Do your Irish return first. Then on your Cdn return deduct (on Sch 1) the $taxes you have already paid there so you don't double pay.


1

Is this the most direct way (removing the middle man) of investing in stocks? There ain't no middleman, like the old days. But if you take it literally, the broker is the middleman. What other services should I consider ? Use a comparison website or trawl the web for opinions and reviews. Pay particular importance to how client money is safeguarded, ...


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