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IRA is a special type of tax-advantaged account in the USA that is intended to encourage people to save and invest for their own retirement. In general, if you pull money out of an IRA before you reach retirement age, you lose the tax advantages and may even have to pay a penalty. Merriam-Webster defines Retirement as: 1a : an act of retiring : the state of ...


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IRA is an Individual Retirement Arrangement. An account that is an IRA can be at a bank, credit union, a broker, a mutual fund family. Inside that IRA you can invest in stocks, bonds, Certificates of deposit According to the IRS: Topic No. 451 Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs) An individual retirement arrangement (IRA) is a tax-favored personal ...


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The limitations on contributions to IRA (Traditional or Roth) is only on money entering the retirement system. Things that don't count as a contribution: Transfer from investment A to investment B within an IRA. Transfer from IRA type X at one manager to an IRA type X with a different manager. Converting Traditional IRA to a Roth IRA. Now the change from ...


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You can directly contribute only up to the annual limit, regardless of whether it's tax deductible or not. However you can contribute more under certain circumstances using what's often called a "mega backdoor Roth IRA conversion." It goes like this: You may be eligible to contribute to a 401k plan through your employer. That plan may offer "...


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The IRA contribution limit applies to both deductible and non-deductible contributions. If you were to contribute more than that, you'd have to pay a 6% tax every year until the excess and associated earnings are removed.


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Yes, you can convert as little as you want to a Roth IRA, all the way up to the entire account value. At most you would owe regular income tax on the full amount you convert; less if you made non-deductible contributions. Also note that you don't need to call it a "backdoor" conversion, particularly if it's taxable. It's just a standard Roth ...


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Yes, you always have capital gains tax-free trades inside a traditional IRA, regardless of whether contributions were deducted. The difference comes in when you make withdrawals. The proportion of the withdrawal that is non-taxable is the proportion of your non-deductible contributions over the total account value (considering all traditional, SEP, and ...


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There are many things that an employer can customize about its 401(k) plan, and the feature to allow participants to rollover funds out of the plan while still employed is one of those things. You’ll need to ask your company’s HR department to find out if this is allowed under your 401(k) plan’s rules.


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So I am considering rolling over my 401K into a traditional IRA account. We will assume that you can do this. Not all employers allow current employees to do this. I currently have a 401K account from my employer. Not all value in the 401(k) is the same. It depends on the source of those funds. will I get taxed on the money when I roll it over from my ...


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If it's your current employer (which seems to be, given that you wrote, "currently ... my employer), you can't. It's "stuck" in that 401(k) until you don't work there anymore. (Some plans allow you to transfer -- not borrow! -- money out while still employed, but that's rare.) The only and partial solution is to reduce your 401(k) contribs, ...


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The order you propose works, the wash process has the new shares bought in the traditional broker account taking on the lower basis, the deferred wash loss. No issue buying more shares in the IRA after that. If you flipped the timing the capital loss is not preserved as a future benefit.


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