New answers tagged

0

Refinance the private and public loan into two low fixed interest loan. The first golden rules on real investments are never invest using leverage(loan money). By looking at your total debts, any investment is deemed (loan) leveraging, it is similar to borrowing $210K with 8% interest rate ($16,800 interest annually) and try to speculate on investment that ...


0

Besides what @tuxtuxtux says... given the potential for a downturn in 401k/IRA accounts This demonstrates a misunderstanding about what Retirement Accounts are (which is "containers"). You can put high-risk, low-risk, medium-risk and any mix you desire (depending of course on what funds the plan administrators support). Thus, put money in 401(k) and ...


2

It's hard to stay out of speculative investing, but given the potential for a downturn in 401k/IRA accounts, should I funnel what percentage of my liquid cash should I be investing in my student loans? How about all of it? You're averaging almost 8% in interest now, which is a fantastic risk-free rate of return. I certainly wouldn't funnel any after-tax ...


2

Objectively, that is a lot to repay. Congratulations for acknowledging that it needs to be repaid quickly. Confirm that the refinancing is truly no-fee, that there are no origination fees, closing fees, or similar built into the loan. Given 1. is true, you should definitely refinance all the private loans. I would recommend refinancing all the federal ...


2

You can use a good retirement calculator to reverse engineer a simplistic semblance of a ball park answer. Some of the inputs will be: current age retirement age other sources of income value of assets debt Plug all of the info in and it will tell you how long your money will last. Incrementally increase the assets input until you get to an acceptable ...


0

You want approximately $5k/month, meaning approximately $60k/year. It's generally considered safe to withdraw around 4% of your retirement savings each year, though increasingly people are thinking that's a bit aggressive, and 3% is safer. Let's go with 4%, though. That means you need about $2,000,000 saved, assuming that is your only income. You need $1,500,...


-1

It's difficult to do the research beforehand. From my experience, the most important part is managing fees (both management and associated fees). I've used 2 financial advisors and 5 robo-advisors in the past and the S&P 500 beat all of them. The management fees ranged from 0.25% to 1% and the performance certainly didn't justify the fee. These ...


3

Why should you choose? Take the easy route and invest in a set of low-cost passive funds that follow the S&P500, Russell 2000, a Total Bond Index, etc.


0

If you can't make a decision, then you probably don't have enough information. You mention that you know very little about stocks or investing, and that is the problem right there. Not everyone has to try and be Ray Dalio, or Jim Simons, or Warren Buffett, but every investor should be informed enough to understand their own investments to a reasonable degree....


Top 50 recent answers are included