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108 votes
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I bought my first shares in life and they dropped 25% in a very short time. What to do?

What were my mistakes? Buying individual stocks. Over 80% of all professional fund managers are doing worse than a simple S&P 500. These are people who get 100s of 1000s of dollars per year for ...
Hilmar's user avatar
  • 7,915
63 votes

I bought my first shares in life and they dropped 25% in a very short time. What to do?

I would like to know in retrospect what I and other Coinbase stock buyers did wrong. What are the lessons learned for my future? What were my mistakes? You bought a meme stock during the manic phase ...
Bob Baerker's user avatar
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48 votes

I bought my first shares in life and they dropped 25% in a very short time. What to do?

You are just starting to learn about investing, so it helps to go over the fundamentals. Typically when an individual has a small amount of spare cash they will put it into a savings account at a bank....
thelem's user avatar
  • 1,464
34 votes

I bought my first shares in life and they dropped 25% in a very short time. What to do?

What are the lessons learned for my future? What were my mistakes? Specific lesson learned about Coinbase? You bought it because it was in the news. Specifically, you bought it because of favorable ...
Harper - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
30 votes
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Must a company have a specific number of employees to do an IPO?

While there is no legal reason to have a minimum number of employees, there can be a practical reason. They want to look like a good solid investment so that investors will give them money, which ...
Stig Hemmer's user avatar
25 votes

Must a company have a specific number of employees to do an IPO?

No, there is no minimum employee limit in order for a company to initiate an initial public offering.
quid's user avatar
  • 49k
23 votes

Why would a company prevent their employees from selling their pre-IPO equity?

One reason for a Private company to restrict the number of shareholders is that is there are additional SEC reporting compliance requirements once you exceed the threshold of 2,000 shareholders / 500 ...
Morrison Chang's user avatar
21 votes

Does an IPO mean a company is going public or is already public?

I know IPO means that particular company, regardless of the country, is offering some quantity of their stocks to the public via stock exchange. An IPO is an initial Public offering. They are taking ...
mhoran_psprep's user avatar
20 votes
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How do companies get money from being listed publicly?

Being listed publicly doesn't get a company any money. Getting the listing is what does it: the company sells new shares in an Initial Public Offering (IPO), the underwriter takes its cut of the ...
Pete Becker's user avatar
  • 5,502
20 votes

I bought my first shares in life and they dropped 25% in a very short time. What to do?

One thing you should take from this experience is how much you need to consider your choices of saving instruments. If you are going to invest in shares of a single company then you should assure ...
Dave's user avatar
  • 823
17 votes

I bought my first shares in life and they dropped 25% in a very short time. What to do?

Be aware of the sunk cost fallacy. The money you lost is gone and nothing you can do will bring it back. What you do now should be largely independent of that. Let's say you had the money you have ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
15 votes

Does an IPO mean a company is going public or is already public?

It's all in the name: Initial Public Offering (IPO). Before that, it's a private company. If an already public company issues more stock, it's called a secondary offering.
0xFEE1DEAD's user avatar
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12 votes
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what's the difference between money raised in an ipo and its valuation?

A company generally sells a portion of its ownership in an IPO, with existing investors retaining some ownership. In your example, they believe that the entire company is worth $25MM, so in order to ...
D Stanley's user avatar
  • 137k
11 votes

Why would a company prevent their employees from selling their pre-IPO equity?

Typical IPOs tend to have a lock-up period which prevents insiders (founders, employees, venture capitalists) from selling their shares for some amount of time after the IPO. The waiting period tends ...
Bob Baerker's user avatar
  • 76.7k
8 votes

What Happens to Cofounders' Shares when they IPO?

A company typically goes public in order to bring in additional capital. In an IPO, the company (through its officials) will typically do so by issuing additional shares, and offering to sell those ...
user's user avatar
  • 4,609
8 votes

Does an IPO mean a company is going public or is already public?

Since you didn't specify a country, I'll answer on the basis of the UK, given that it is a major financial center. Just bear in mind that exact definitions may vary in other jurisdictions. It is a ...
JBentley's user avatar
  • 2,513
7 votes
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Is Volvo a public company?

There are two different companies named "Volvo." The publicly-traded company with ticker symbol VOLV-B is called Volvo Group, or AB Volvo. They primarily build trucks, buses, and construction ...
Ben Miller's user avatar
  • 116k
7 votes

To the employer, is equity more or less expensive than payroll?

It depends. On one hand, paying you in shares can be almost free for the company. The directors just have to pay for the administration costs of issuing you the shares. If they are paying you shares ...
Lawrence's user avatar
  • 9,372
6 votes

Can an IPO be cancelled if not successful?

IPOs are cancelled for a number of reasons: The company finds a better funding option than an IPO Other recent IPOs have not done well and weaker sisters are pulled Market nervousnness: The market is ...
Bob Baerker's user avatar
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6 votes
Accepted

What happens on the NYSE during an IPO such that the first trade may be hours after the opening bell?

When a company does an Initial Public Offering it is making its shares available for purchase by members of the public for the first time. There are two markets - the "primary" and the &...
xirt's user avatar
  • 5,121
6 votes

I bought my first shares in life and they dropped 25% in a very short time. What to do?

You should sell and take your losses because you don't yet know what you are doing. Imagine that you were twelve years old and the family was not home. You borrowed the car keys, took the other car, ...
Dave Harris's user avatar
  • 4,277
6 votes

I bought my first shares in life and they dropped 25% in a very short time. What to do?

There's already plenty of answers, but I'll try to help you with the analysis part. How to understand and accept the results. And how to make decisions in the future. Now my loss at 25% It's ok for ...
Džuris's user avatar
  • 661
5 votes

How is initial stock price (IPO) of a stock determined

Who determines company value at IPO? The Owners based on the advice from Lead Bankers and other Independent auditors who would determine the value of the company at the time of listing. At times ...
Dheer's user avatar
  • 57.1k
5 votes

Must a company have a specific number of employees to do an IPO?

Working for a lot of startups, I have seen this cycle. Really it has little to do with making the IPO look good because of number of employees, and is more about making the IPO look good because of ...
coteyr's user avatar
  • 3,661
5 votes

How to buy an IPO?

Institutional investors typically get the lion's share of an IPO allocation. On the retail side, generally you need an account with a broker that is part of the underwriting syndicate. Good IPOs ...
Bob Baerker's user avatar
  • 76.7k
5 votes
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Why do some services list an IPO date that is well after historical price data you can find elsewhere?

The Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company was established in 1902 as a private company. It first raised public funds around 1903 but had a limited shareholder base. By around 1929, it was ...
Richard at NorgateData's user avatar
5 votes

How do companies get money from being listed publicly?

The common approach to an IPO is for the company to hire an investment banker (IB) who will underwrite the shares (sell the stock to the public). There may be an associated underwriting syndicate. ...
Bob Baerker's user avatar
  • 76.7k
5 votes

Why would a company prevent their employees from selling their pre-IPO equity?

Some companies may not want their shares to be widely distributed Consider a small, family owned corporation. One of the part owners needs cash now (for example, due to a divorce settlement). ...
RonJohn's user avatar
  • 50.7k
5 votes
Accepted

Does the owner of a company effectively "give up" a portion of his company on IPO?

I’m effectively “giving up” that chunk of the pie because the money raised through an IPO goes to the company This is true, which is why an IPO is a method of raising capital for the company to use. ...
Stan H's user avatar
  • 7,551
4 votes

Can an IPO be cancelled if not successful?

Although I gave Bob Baerker's answer a vote I should add that in general the large IPOs that people hear about (and all in some "western" countries thanks to legislation and market rules) are backed ...
MD-Tech's user avatar
  • 9,025

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