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You reference the Great Recession specifically, which was the 2007-2009 recession. The bear market of 2007-2009 lasted 1.3 years and sent the S&P 500 down by 50.9%. - investopedia, A History of Bear Markets The article also references the 1929 Stock Market Crash, which “sliced 83.4% off the value of the S&P 500”. There isn’t a ‘safe’ LVR. Even ...


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I wonder, is there is a safe margin loan, Loan Value Ratio (LVR) to avoid a margin call? There are three factors involved in determining at what price you receive a margin call: Initial margin requirement (50%) MMMR or minimum margin maintenance requirement (25%) the amount that share price drops The numbers in parenthesis are the levels set by Reg T in ...


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I never leverage speculative positions but given you essentially magnify/multiply the loss/profit by the amount of leverage you apply the intra-day volatility of the investment vehicle you wish to speculate on is of the utmost importance to my understanding. To wipe out your position you need to reach an amount of losses equal to original position so at ...


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A correct response will be a list of books or resources that successful day stock traders deem to be a good learning source. There are tons of books with a mix of contradictory view on truth, half-truth and hindsight. So reading those "trade secret" books is not enough. I will suggest you go invest part of your fund on a prudent stock that you gain most ...


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Assuming that this is the US and if you have less than $25k in a cash account then you can only day trade settled cash (T+2). If you make more than 3 day trades (options and equities) in a rolling 5 business day period in a margin account then you are considered to be a Pattern Day Trader and must maintain a minimum equity of $25k in a margin account on ...


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Short answer: yes. Your last paragraph makes me unsure whether or not you know how shorting works, though. Generally you open a position by buying a stock and you pay long term capital gains tax if you hold that stock (or have an open position) for over a year. If you short a stock you're selling a stock you don't own (to open a position) and then later ...


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I love the bidet idea. Other than that you've got an array of tissue quality options that can impact price significantly. You could try to go for the truckstop/restaurant quality giant rolls, might save you a bit, but standard sized rolls frequently go on sale. The Costco toilet paper standard price (might vary by area) is $0.00125/sheet. If you already ...


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If you are spending $3/week on toilet paper, the likely problem is not the wiping technique, but the folding technique. People who wad up a large amount of paper will use far more than someone who pulls out 5 or so sheets (2-ply) and folds them. As a child I had a friend with a very large family, and there was a house rule that limited the number of sheets ...


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You could save money on the paper instead. For example, Costco Kirkland Signature paper is $26.99 for 36 rolls, or 75 cents per roll. It seems unlikely that you’re personally using four rolls per week, so you could save money by switching. (I have no affiliation with Costco.)


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You could invest into a bidet. A bidet is a shower which allows you to clean your nether-regions after using the toilet. When you use a bidet, you can use a lot less toilet paper. But you will of course slightly increase your warm water consumption. They are available in form of a stand-alone installation which looks like a cross-breed between a toilet ...


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You've understood part of the picture of value investing, but there are a few other important parts. This is why your premise is true (fear creates buying opportunities) but your conclusion does not follow (right now may or may not be a good time to invest). Let's start with the facts: The market lately has hit record after record (S&P at 3025 on Jul 26)...


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