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250

In my opinion the ability to have wealth comes down to one thing: Behavior. For many it is a tough pill to swallow, but once a person realizes that they have control over their financial future they can then act accordingly. However, many are stuck blaming some bogey man to retain the ability to behave how they wish. There are countless examples of ...


235

It all comes down to 2 things: Financial illiteracy Insufficient initial capital For the first point, a very low number of people even possess basic knowledge of finance. If you don't know any better and learning basic economic concepts is disregarded throughout your upbringing (be it in education or parenting), then it's highly unlikely for you to ...


172

Do I make money in the stock market from other people losing money? Not normally.* The stock market as a whole, on average, increases in value over time. So if we make the claim that the market is a zero-sum game, and you only make money if other people lose money, that idea is not sustainable. There aren't that many people that would keep investing in ...


147

It's important to remember what a share is. It's a tiny portion of ownership of a company. Let's pretend we're talking about shares in a manufacturing company. The company has one million shares on its register. You own one thousand of them. That means that you own 1/1000th of the company. These shares are valued by the market at $10 per share. The ...


147

If you are making that much, don't waste your time here. Pay a few hundred bucks for a consultation with a fee-only certified financial planner. (Not one of the "free" services, which make their money via commissions on sales and are thus motivated to direct you to whatever gets them the largest commission.) In fact, in your bracket you might want to ...


141

The scammers not giving your money back would prevent you from pulling out of the "investment" (scam). They may pay out the claimed returns for a month or a few months in order to build credibility to get more "investors", but if they're trying to scam you, there is no way they'd give back all of your money once they have it. As comments and other answers ...


138

Sorry if it seems to be nitpicking, but what does “family friend” mean? I have come to understand the spectrum of friendship to be; an acquaintance will send you an email congratulating you on your move. A friend will bring you a house-warming gift. A good friend will help you move. Your best friend will help you move a body. With all the questions that we ...


134

Because you have to be rich to get rich! Let's set up a model calculation. (don´t get hung up on these numbers - do your own calculations with your own goals and premises!) I define be rich as owning $1 million Average return on your funds 7% Say from age 0-10 you get some money from your family, because you are lucky, and your parents put it an an ...


128

Almost nobody would just give you a pile of money with no expectation of return. In most cases you exchange equity in the company for the investment. A simple example might be that I estimate your idea/company to be worth $4M currently, so for $1M I want 25% equity. When you sell for $30M, I get 25% of the proceeds. If you go belly up, I likely don't recoup ...


119

Stephen's answer is the 100% correct one made with the common Economics assumption, that people are rational. A company that never has paid dividends, is still worth something to people because of its potential to start paying dividends later and it is often better to grow now and payoff later. However, the actual answer is much more disapointing, because ...


118

You grossly miscalculated because you forgot that money has to actually be in the account to earn. You earn nothing on the £50 you haven't deposited yet. And that is the first problem: compounding isn't working for you because compounding takes time, and only 600 quid is even in there for 4 years. You're getting fleeced Adjust for the above, and the ...


115

You're asking if lottery ticket can ever produce a positive expected value (EV). The short answer is, "no". There's an interesting article that goes into the details and is heavy on the math and graphs. The key point: Even if you think you have a positive expected value due to the size of the jackpot being larger than the number of possible numbers, as more ...


114

In general, borrowing money to invest is a risky proposition for a very simple reason: investments can go down in value, while the loans you had to take to make the investment absolutely do not go down in price if the investment didn't work out. So you have a guaranteed cost, but never a guaranteed return. That said, there are a number of red flags here ...


112

(Under US investment laws) Assume for the moment that you succeed in your plan. You invest some money in the Ponzi scheme, accumulate some "earnings" on paper, and then are able to get the scammer to return your original investment and your "earnings". You then find another Ponzi scheme and repeat... Things look great for you... Then, the Ponzi schemes ...


110

First-time investors, quite frankly, do not have enough experience to accurately assess their risk appetite. You're willing to "gamble" with that £50/month, but that's because it's just £50, and you're understandably salivating over that "42%". That wears off. Over time, you'll be investing £thousands. (In ten years, you'll have put £6k of your own money in....


110

It means they're making a big loss in cash terms, yes. The claim that they are profitable is based on a theory that they are accumulating valuable assets in exchange. In Netflix's case, it's that they are spending lots of money on their content, which they expect to produce income in future years too. So essentially lots of cash going out the door now, but ...


106

Real estate can be rented out (or otherwise "used"), so it "produces" income. He's not solely investing in real estate in the hopes the value increases, he's saying it's a better investment because it produces income whether or not the value increases.


104

Instead of stocks, let’s apply this logic to houses. Houses are expensive. However, if I buy a house at a high price, I’m okay if I can sell it for more than I bought it for at some point in the future. As long as the prices continue to climb, everyone is happy, right? So let’s decide to make a law that says that a house can never go down in value; ...


102

Because “rich” is a result of an uneven distribution of wealth. Last I researched, the total US wealth divided by the total population resulted in $160K/person. $320K/couple is not rich. The median wealth number is far lower than this to offset those with millions, and of course, billions. This is how we get to the articles that mention how the top few ...


102

No, what it says is “In half a year, we’ll give whoever holds this bond $10,000 for which you pay us $9,750 now”. This is equivalent to an annual interest rate of about 5% (the example is showing a yield way more than currently available). Plus you can sell the bond to another person in the meantime.


94

The company got its money for those shares when it issued them. When they're subsequently sold (assuming it's not the company doing the buying or selling), that sale doesn't change the company's bank account balance -- the proceeds from the sale (minus commissions) go directly from buyer to seller.


88

Making money is not the same as building wealth. Consider two examples. Jim is a hard-working person who earns after taxes, $1,000 per week. Jim rents a home. Jim finds a way to spend almost exactly $1,000 on rent, food, insurance, gasoline, etc. every week. At the end of the year, his only assets are his depreciating car, furniture, clothing and $12.57 in ...


86

I am not going to discuss legality, because with family members you are able to give a lot of guidance and assistance without running into legal issues. The biggest problem is that when they transfer the funds to you and you invest the money, all the tax rates and tax limits are determined by your situation; plus you have more investments than you should ...


83

The other answers here do an excellent job of laying out the mathematics of the expected value. Here is a different take on the question of whether lottery tickets are a sensible investment. I used to have the snobbish attitude that many mathematically literate people have towards lotteries: that they are "a tax on the mathematically illiterate", and so on. ...


82

Remember that a salary is temporary. Until you are independently wealthy—that is, until you can live off the income generated by your invested capital—there's always more investing you could do with the excess. Invest outside your 401k if you are at the limit for contributions. Plain investing accounts continue to exist. Learn more about doing ...


80

You should invest in that with the best possible outcome. Right now that is in yourself. Your greatest wealth building tool, at this point, is your future income. As such anything you can do to increase your earnings potential. For some that might mean getting an engineering degree, for others it might mean starting a small business. For some it is both ...


77

Free, huh? From their Commission and Fee Schedule: So if you literally bought two shares, then the SEC added one penny in fees and FINRA added one penny as a "Trading Activity Fee" Note that there are several other fees on their schedule that may not apply to you. If you had bought 100 shares instead, your total fees would have still been only 2 cents, ...


72

why does it make sense financially to buy property and become a landlord? Because then your investment generates cash instead of just sitting idle. All taxes, fees and repairs aside it would take almost 21 years before I start making profits. No - your profit will be the rents that you collect (minus expenses). You still have an asset that is worth ...


70

A few points. You may be interested in this website which helps you calculate the total cost of car ownership, and factors in things like insurance, gas, mileage, repairs, registration, etc... These costs are not inconsequential and have a tendency to add up. Even this calculator doesn't consider all the costs though because it ignores the lost opportunity ...


66

Do they want your help? Many times parents have difficulty taking advice from those whose nose and butt they wiped. Your accomplishments and investments are independent of the fact. What are their needs? They likely have social security and is that meeting their needs now? What happens after dad passes? Coming up with solid numbers is an important step ...


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