6

No. Each economy is different in terms of interest rates, rates of inflation, and rates of national economic growth. All of those are factors in the rate of return of a country's equity market, so their rates of return will be different. I would also note that even different indices within a country's market will be different. The return of the S&P 500 (...


5

Imagine you have a bank account with $100 in it. You are thinking about selling this bank account, so ask for some bids on what it's worth. You get quotes of around $100. You decide to sell it, but before you do, you take $50 out of it to have in cash. Would you expect the market to still pay $100 for the account? The dividend is effectively the cash ...


4

You either short that currency against the USD or you buy the USD against that currency. Both are the same thing and will give you the same result. But be careful as the FX market is open 24 hours (except Sundays), so make sure you apply risk management unless you plan to be stuck to your screen all day and night. If you don't want to do FX trading, then ...


3

Provided the USD-denominated ETFs are not currency-hedged, their performance will be tied to the actual value of the holdings (converted to USD at the dynamic exchange rate). So they do offer the same protection. That is, aside from expenses and tracking error, an investor would be indifferent to converting dollars to euros and buying a EUR-denominated ETF, ...


3

You borrow that currency and immediately exchange it for USD. Then you hold the USD (as collateral for the money you borrowed). When/if the currency falls sharply, you buy it back using some of the USD. Since you no longer have a loan, you can then withdraw the USD. You can do this with pretty much any forex broker. Note that you will have to pay interest ...


3

You shares and of other customers of your broker are held in a nominee account. Pooled nominee accounts, also known as omnibus accounts. The shares are usually held in electronic form, but the name that appears in the records as the legal owner is a nominee company, which is usually owned by your stock broker. Many different investments held by clients ...


3

NASDAQ has Pre and After market : NASDAQ Trading Schedule Regular Trading Session Schedule The NASDAQ Stock Market Trading Sessions (Eastern Time) Pre-Market Trading Hours from 4:00 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Market Hours from 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. After-Market Hours from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Quote and order-entry from 4:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. ...


3

The NYSE is not the only exchange in the world (or even the only one in the USA). Amazingly, the London stock exchange works on London time, the Shanghai exchange works on Shanghai time and the Australian stock exchange works on Sydney time. In addition futures exchanges work overnight.


3

In this environment, I don't think that it is advisable to buy a broad emerging market fund. Why? "Emerging market" is too broad... Look at the top 10 holdings of the fund... You're exposed to Russia & Brazil (oil driven), Chinese and Latin American banks and Asian electronics manufacturing. Those are sectors that don't correlate, in economies that ...


3

This is actually a fairly hard question to answer well as much of the currency trading that is done in financial markets is actually done directly with banks and other financial institutions instead of on a centralized market and the banks are understandably not always excited to part with information on how exactly they do their business. Other methods of ...


3

The answer to your question doesn't depend on who you trade with but what country you live in. If you live outside of the US, you will have to pay tax on dividends... sometimes. This depends on the tax treaty that your country has with the US. Canada, Australia, UK and a few other countries have favorable tax treaties with the US that allow you to not be ...


2

What would be the best strategy to avoid paying income taxes on the sale after I move to another US state? Leaving the US and terminating your US residency before the sale closes. Otherwise consider checking your home country's tax treaty with the US. In any case, for proper tax planning you should employ a licensed tax adviser - an EA, CPA or an ...


2

Investopedia has a nice article on this here The Key benefit looks like better returns with lower capital. The disadvantage is few brokers offering that can be trusted. Potentially lower return due to margins / spreads. Higher leverage and can become an issue.


2

It depends on whether the dividends are distributed by a US entity or not. While companies may be head-quartered in one location, the jurisdiction under which they're organized may be elsewhere entirely. What's important is the jurisdiction under which the corporation is organized (US or not), not where the corporation physically does business. See here: ...


2

I would not be trading anything with low volume. You will find it hard to get the price you want to buy and to sell. There would usually be large price gaps and it is a sure way to lose money on every trade. You are better off trading instruments with as high volume as possible - better chance of buying and selling at price you want and less change of price ...


2

What you need is a International Trading Brokerage Account that's based out of Mexico. I'm not familiar with Finanzen, but it looks like it's Germany based. International trading brokerage accounts allow you to make Stock/ETF trades in other countries, but not all international brokerage accounts allow trading in all countries. You can usually look on the ...


2

You can do this via many online FOREX brokers. All you need to do is set up and fund an account with them and then trade via their online platform. Some examples of brokers that do this are: Ameritrade Interactive Brokers FXCM


1

Pretty sure that #1 is true. I've never had difficulties trading from every country I travel to. There is a short list of countries that are not allowed - such as Cuba, Syria, etc. Nowhere a good VPN can't get around. Once you have an account, the trading company doesn't really care as long as you're not breaking laws. As for #2, it's probably not worth the ...


1

For all stocks, expected Dividends are a part of the price it is traded for - consider that originally, the whole idea of stocks was to participate in the earnings of the company = get dividends. The day the dividend is paid, that expectation is of course removed, and thereby the stock value reduced by just the amount of dividend paid. You will see that ...


1

When the Brexit vote was in, it so happened that I had entered a short position on SPY a few days prior. I had a thesis that it was overbought and due for a downdraft, although I was not thinking of Brexit specifically. The public overreacted (in my opinion) and SPY crashed, I was able to move fast and make out with like 10% gains over a few days which isn't ...


1

Depending on your country (basically, if you're not a US citizen), you can consider using a CFD brokerage. A CFD brokerage allows you to trade commodities, currencies, or stocks without having to buy the actual commodities/currencies/stocks since you are trading its value. Your profit comes from the difference in price between the time that you buy and the ...


1

Which of these two factors is likely to be more significant? There is long term trend that puts one favourable with other. .... I realise that I could just as easily have lost 5% on the LSE and made 5% back on the currency, leaving me with my original investment minus various fees; or to have lost 5% on both. Yes that is true. Either of the 3 scenarios ...


1

You will not be able to continue filing with TurboTax if you invest in foreign funds. Form 8261 which is required to report PFIC investments is not included. Read the form instructions carefully - if you don't feel shocked and scared, you didn't understand what it says. The bottom line is that the American Congress doesn't want you do what you want to do ...


1

Saxo Bank offers direct access to Athens Stock Exchange. Interactive Brokers is your next best bet, and as you probably already noticed, they do not have a free platform. They are open to US and non-US citizens. Although they do not currently have direct exposure to individual companies on the Athens Stock Exchange, the various european exchanges they do ...


1

You'll need to talk to your broker about registering positions you already hold. I would personally expect this will cost you a not-insignificant fee. And I don't think you'll be able to do this on any shares held in a tax-advantaged account. That said, I'd recommend you go to the Investors sections of the company's website in question. This will usually ...


1

Interactive Brokers offers many foreign markets (19 countries) for US based investors. You can trade all these local markets within one universal account which is very convenient in my view. IB offering


1

Your question has 2 components: a trading platform, and a strategy. Online trading platforms are everywhere and a Google search will turn up lots and lots of them. I'm in Canada and I use www.questrade.com. Trades are $4.95 minimum, changing to $0.01/stock in quantity. Banks can offer online trading platforms, some of which offer reduced fees if you ...


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