New answers tagged

-3

I had $1M for 3½ months, I would put ~$900k in four 3-month CDs (if you can find them) and use ~$100k as the underwriting for a payday advance company. Getting in contact with the right people will take some work though. This could give $10-15k in gains, even considering the current economic climate. Others might not like my idea, but you asked for ...


1

Of course, I would always consult a fiduciary investment advisor. I would imagine my investment advisor would recommend investing the money long-term in a diversified allocation portfolio, possible refinance the land debt (when interest rates drop lower, hopefully soon) and service the land debt from the growth/income from the invested money.


23

In addition to R.Hamilton's answer (upvoted), I would add that there is some not insignificant risk at the moment of financial crisis #2 due to the demand and supply shocks, (covid 19 + oil market drops ), overstretched corporate borrowing, and central banks having run out of ammo trying to keep 2007 on ice. I think it would be very wise to split the money ...


4

Possibly, invest the funds long-term and re-finance the land debt from a position of better credit standing. Also, close to 50% of the funds in a brokerage account can be taken out of the account on margin and institutional margin rates can be found. Then an interest-only loan can be developed such that simply future performance of the investment possibly ...


5

Unless you want take a more significant risk, that's probably anout the best you can do. Investing it into the market - bonds or ETFs or even shares - would give you a chance to earn a lot on it, but also to lose a lot on it. With a short time horizon like this, you would not be able to recover losses. If you had ten years, the recommendation would be to ...


109

If you need that money for a payment 3 1/2 months away, then you need to be extremely risk averse. Maybe even to the point that you may want to spread that $1mil to several banks to stay under the FDIC limits of $250k/account. You will not get great return, but you will be sure to have it when you want it such a short time away.


4

I can imagine there are people selling on the secondary market at given interest rates, therefore the rate changes on the basis of those trades. No - the rate for a given bond is fixed, and is set by the entity that issued the bond (there are floating-rate bonds, but the rate is not determined by the market for that bond, but rather by some other "reference"...


1

Yes, for a non-resident alien (as defined for US tax purposes) interest on a US bank account is excluded, unless 'effectively connected' to a 'trade or business' you operate in the US; see pub 519 chapter 3. And interest from a foreign bank is not US-source at all, and thus not subject to US tax as an NRA. (It may be taxable to you in the country where it is ...


Top 50 recent answers are included