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10

This is not true in general in the UK. The insurance policy states the drivers it applies to. If your mom wants a policy that only covers her, and not you, that's fine. As for "emergency driving", the standard UK policy coverage is that the named drivers are covered to drive other vehicles which they do not own, with the owner's permission - but the ...


3

Existing answers cover most of your question well: Your mother's insurance rates definitely can rise if you move into the household and have a driver's license of your own It wouldn't be difficult for the insurer to find out that you have a license, though they may or may not know that you live with your mother (particularly if you aren't a minor) But they ...


4

In germany, living in the same household as the insurance holder doesn't matter because that alone won't allow you to drive the car. Many (private) car insurance policies have a list of drivers for that car. If you are not on that list you cannot drive that car, and the premium is in consequence unaffected. Of course, if you are added to that list the ...


9

It sounds like you're thinking that if your mom's insurance cost will increase, you're hoping to avoid that increase by getting your own car and your own insurance. Note it may be cheaper to to have your mom insure both cars and add you as a driver rather than you each having your own policies. (Or if you don't get another car right away and you share hers.) ...


0

How would the insurance company even know I have a license anyway? The insurance company could query the state for other people with drivers licenses with the same address. They could also require your parent to update their policy when a member of the household gets a license, or a licensed drivers enters or leaves the household. It is possible to not ...


18

In the United States, the car insurance company may not know that you have a license; it's the insured party's obligation to report any changes in the household. However, depending on the state, you may or may not have to consider that person a covered driver. For example, from this article on Who is considered a household member for car insurance purposes:...


7

australia It depends. Insurers often offer a range of premiums for the same car, depending on the options chosen. Some of the options include cover for young/inexperienced drivers, and other options allow you to specify the only drivers permitted to drive the vehicle. You may also be able to pick cover that allows everyone to drive, regardless of ...


34

(Edit: answered before "What if I have my own insurance?" was added to the question.) Is that true? Yes, because you'd be someone who lives with her, and who can drive. You'd have implicit permission to drive her vehicles. Thus, the insurance company will have to take into account that another (and presumably young and inexperienced) person in the ...


1

Rejected means claims were not processed due to technical errors in submission, i.e. incomplete documents, delayed reporting etc. Repudiated means that claims were received and processed and determined that insurance company does not have the liability. i.e. not covered in policy etc. http://www.policyholder.gov.in/Rejection_of_Claims.aspx


4

If an insurance policy holder dies, the proceeds go to a second listed beneficiary, and if none are listed, to beneficiaries via will, or last, to the estate of the policy holder. With house insurance, as with car insurance, there can be an issue of rebuilding/repair vs the insurance company claiming total loss, but that's not quite the question here.


1

I just came across a recent paper that discusses the US car insurance practices: Kiviat: The Moral Limits of Predictive Practices: The Case of Credit-Based Insurance Scores, American Sociological Review, 84(6), 1134–1158 Abstract Corporations gather massive amounts of personal data to predict how individuals will behave so that they can profitably price ...


-1

Not sure about Canada but insurance typically involves an open enrollment period or major life events. Open enrollment: For one month out of the year (specified by the employer) employees are allowed to freely sign up for, change, or cancel their insurance plan Major life events (when this happens you can make changes to your insurance): Change in ...


1

You can submit an application for insurance, but you must disclose all of your existing conditions and your family history. Anything that is relevant must be disclosed on the application form. If you neglect to mention your dentist's quote for the substantial work you need, this is known as insurance fraud (which is a criminal act). As others have ...


4

The Manulife link you provided says: Your coverage is guaranteed with no medical questions when you apply and pay your first premium within 90 days of your employee benefits ending. That implies that for new coverage, you will be asked medical questions. And of course your answers will affect whether they accept you, what your rates will be, and what ...


0

No, all dental insurance that I know of will have waiting periods for major work. Many will not have waiting periods for routine cleanings, but that won't help you. Aetna has a dental discount program without a waiting period. But, if you shop around, you can probably get work done for the same cost without the discount.


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