7

No, that's not typical. The IRS refunds site suggests you call if: It has been 21 days or more since you e-filed It has been 6 weeks or more since you mailed your return "Where's My Refund" tells you to contact the IRS It might take longer for prior year returns but I don't see any alternate timelines for prior year returns, in no case would I ...


5

It's actually your money Let me guess. You're in the habit of just selecting exemptions carefully so your refund is not worth worrying about, and just walking away from your tax situation at the end of the year and letting them keep it. OK nothing wrong with that (though this is not a good year to do that). Literally. Nothing wrong with that. Well, ...


5

You will not lose any of your refund as long as you file within 3 years of the date that your return is due. From the IRS website: In most cases, an original return claiming a refund must be filed within three years of its due date for the IRS to issue a refund. Generally, after the three-year window closes, the IRS can neither send a refund for the ...


4

You've misunderstood the amount you need to pay into your pension. You receive £600 in net salary, but you pay in £800 initially. Then they claim £200 to get the £1000, and you claim £200 from HMRC so your net payment is £600. Your calculation has you making a gross payment of £750, not £1000, so the other £100 went in 40% tax on the £250 gross pay you didn'...


4

Given the scenario, the likely answer is Yes you will get a tax refund Withholding at a job is generally calculated as you say "as if this was the salary for this time period [week, month, 2-week] over a full year." That is why they withheld an amount as if you were in a higher bracket. When you fill out your tax return, you will put the total earnings ...


2

So since I only made $38k gross in 2019: Should I be in that lower tax bracket and get a refund? Probably. Even if you had no deductions you would only owe about $2,200 in tax (12% of the amount over 19,400). With a 12,200 standard deduction for a single filer your taxable income your taxable income would be around $26k, and your total tax due would be ...


2

From what I can find, if you are eligible you can fill out the form 673 instead of the w4, but waiting to hear from my tax advisor. I'm in the same boat.


1

Boy you're fast; both forms 1040NR (see next) were only released a few weeks ago, and the instructions still aren't out -- although they shouldn't change much from the 2018 ones. On 1040NR (not -EZ) Social Security is reported on line 8 of schedule NEC (on page 4) as instructed here (link may break when they post 2019, if so look at top left for "Schedule ...


1

For 3 years after the filing date, there's no such thing as "your negligence". You are allowed to amend your taxes using Form 1040X for any reason, or no reason at all. So if you see a deduction you missed, by all means! File a 1040X and claim it. After 3 years, you can amend it, but they won't pay you any more refunds. You should write a completely ...


1

Here's the language from the CO Department of Revenue: Any subtraction claimed for payment or contribution made to a 529 college savings plan is subject to recapture at the time of distribution, refund, or withdrawal unless it is made for a qualifying purpose. Qualifying distributions, refunds, and withdrawals are those made: to pay qualified ...


1

Most of the time, AMT does not generate a credit to be carried forward. It does in cases where the AMT was triggered by deferred taxes, such as the special treatment of ISOs (incentive stock options). When you owe AMT due to such items, you should file Form 8801 each year to compute the credit being carried. In your specific question, it sounds like the ...


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