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No asset is perfect or completely immune to losing value in times of crisis. With any investment your generally trading one type of risk for another. Gold is often viewed as a safe haven asset as it has preserved its value in real terms through hundreds of years of history, but this leads to its market price often becoming overly speculative at times when ...


5

Devaluation is a relative term, so if you want to protect yourself against devaluation of your currency against dollars - just buy dollars. Inflation is something you cannot protect yourself against because it is something that describes the purchasing power of the money. You will still need to purchase, and usually with money. A side effect of inflation is ...


5

Friendship This is a long term investment but can be very useful during tough times. Be prepared not only to take but to give as well. Moreover: it is useful even when no crisis is around the more you use it, the more it provides return on investment


5

Stocks in the Weimar hyperinflation are discussed in When Money Dies. I don't own a copy of the book but here is a link to a blog post about it. Speculation on the stock exchange has spread to all ranks of the population and shares rise like air balloons to limitless heights Basically, the stock market did very well (i.e. the US dollar value of stocks ...


3

This all depends on your risk tolerance. Preservation of capital wise just buying a basket of the stable global currencies and sitting on it will preserve capital well but lose to inflation in the medium/long term. Property is very hard to call and hedge as its a static, high deprecation asset that unless you are able to buy properties in numerous locations ...


3

This would proceed in a course that will have price growth in line with "regular" inflation. Hyperinflation requires inflation to rise by 50%. The UK does do a lot of exporting, so as the pound drops there will be more people demanding exports which will help the value of the pound. The UK exports 55 billion pounds and as the pound falls more countries will ...


2

Barton Biggs's book Wealth, War and Wisdom aims to answer the question of what investments are best-suited to preserving value despite large-scale catastrophes by looking at how various investments and assets performed in countries affected by WWII. In Japan, stocks and urban land turned out to be good investments; in France, farm land and gold did better. ...


2

The options available to you depend in part on whether you yourself are physically abroad or have plans to be. For example, if you moved to say...Japan to teach English for a year, you could establish residency (not necessarily long-term residency, but residency based on having a working visa sponsored by the Japanese company that hires you). You would ...


2

Generally speaking, so-called "hard assets" (namely gold or foreign currency), durable goods, or property that produces income is valuable in a situation where a nation's money supply is threatened. Gold is the universal hard asset. If you have access to a decent market, you can buy gold as bullion, coins and jewelry. Small amounts are valuable and easy to ...


1

In hyperinflation economies, I think it's incorrect to assume that such businesses somehow "know" how much to inflate their prices by as measured by some global "true" value. Instead, they reacted to the same forces that affect businesses today, namely balancing their expenses with what the market will bear (the primary difference being that there would be ...


1

Assuming that the financial system broke down, not enough supply of essential commodities or food but there is political and administrative stability and no such chaos that threatens your life by physical attacks. The best investment would then be some paddy fields, land, some cows, chickens and enough clothing , a safe house to stay and a healthy life ...


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