6

This answer is assuming you're in the US, which apparently you're not. I doubt that the rules in the EU are significantly different, but I don't know for sure. In case of an IRS control, is it ok to say that I regularly connect remotely to work from home although in the work contract it says I must work at client's office? No. Are there any other ...


5

You got it right. It is in part III of the form (form 8829, that is, in its current form). You pay 25% tax on the amounts deducted as depreciation. That is if you sell at more that your current (= post depreciation) basis. Talk to your tax adviser about the details. He may be able to help you getting the old forms if you didn't keep the copies, you'll ...


4

It appears so. I suppose you could try saying that you don't want to pay for it and won't have Internet installed, but that could be detrimental to your career. There is no law that says your company has to pay for your Internet unless you have some kind of contract with them that says you will. If anything, your best option might be to try to claim it is ...


4

Your freelance income will not qualify you for the work-from-home deductions, for that you would need a T2200 form signed by your employer. But, you are allowed to be self employed as a sole-proprietorship while still being an employee of another company. If you take that route, you'll be able to write-off even more expenses than those you linked to. Things ...


3

Even in a regular job you make personal calls. What you don't want is a guest bed in the office. Have the office full of business stuff. I have some old books and hardware that I could probably throw out but I leave that office full.


3

Home office expenses typically refers to the cost of the house's costs (electricity, phone + internet, water, rent, property taxes, mortgage interest and so on) that you pay for, multiplied by the fraction of the house floor area occupied by the area used exclusively as your office. Since those are typically monthly, I'd just allocate them to the office you ...


2

Of course you don't have to pay them - you just might not like the result. As a matter of law - given that I am not a lawyer - I am not aware of any requirement for a company to pay employees business-related expenses. An example might be having a cell phone, and according to this article companies aren't required to pay for you to have a cell phone even if ...


2

Yes, you may deduct the cost of building the "noise cancellation system" :) sorry couldn't resist. But seriously, yes you can deduct it ONCE (unless you have more cost maintaining it) and its on line 19 (Repairs and maintenance) of IRS Form 8829.


2

Yes, all the house footage is treated the same. The use of home is a (suspected) audit trigger, so do consult with a tax professional if you want to take this deduction. From the statute (IRC Sec. 280A): The term dwelling unit includes a house, apartment, condominium, mobile home, boat, or similar property, and all structures or other property ...


2

This is essentially a reimbursement of your expense. Since you can deduct the expense, the fact that the reimbursement is taxable doesn't affect you much. You deduct your home office expenses on your annual tax return using form 8829. See the IRS site for more details. If you're asking about the UK tax, there may be some other considerations, but from the ...


1

You need to look into this guidance from the IRS: Requirements to Claim the Home Office Deduction Regardless of the method chosen, there are two basic requirements for your home to qualify as a deduction: Regular and exclusive use. Principal place of your business. Regular and Exclusive Use. You must regularly use part of your home exclusively for ...


1

On form 8829, line 20 you can list utilities paid for the home office. You have two choices: 1) You can list the entire amount under column (b) as an indirect expense. You will then get a deduction for the fraction of the amount based on what fraction of your home is an office. This makes sense if the service equally benefits your entire home. 2) You can ...


1

As DJClayworth said, be very careful with this one! The property is a residence, not a business location. Given that, it is almost a certainty that the IRS is not going to let you claim 100% of the expenses for the home as a business expense, even if nobody's actually living there. You may get away with doing this for a period of time and not run into ...


1

You are pushing your luck, but not because you're not in the US, because it is likely that you're not qualified. From what you said, I doubt you can take it (I'm not a professional though, get a professional opinion). You say "dedicated space". It has to be an exclusive room. You cannot deduct 10 sq. ft. from your living room because your computer that is ...


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