311

That "something" you are signing means you are liable for the mortgage payments - yes, all of them - if he can't or won't pay at any point. The limit on what the bank will lend him based on his salary is there for a reason - they don't expect him to be able to keep up repayments if they lend him more (or more precisely, there's a big risk that he won't). ...


174

What are the risks, if any The risks are exemplified by the outcomes presented on this website, including: What can I do when the co-signer hasn't paid anything on the house in 7 years and now they want money? How do I get myself out this disastrous situation What can I do as a co-signer? I signed on as the co-signer on a car loan and somehow ended up ...


75

To supplement existing answers: the appraised value does not necessarily represent the net amount the bank could actually recover with a foreclosure. Let's look at it from the point of view of the bank. Suppose the property appraises at $200,000 and they do what you want: loan you $200,000 with the property as collateral. Now suppose a short time later, ...


73

A financial institution is not obligated to offer you a loan. They will only offer you a loan if they believe that they will make money off you. They use all the info available in order to determine if offering you a loan is profitable. In short, whether they offer you a loan, and the interest rate they charge for that loan, is based on a few things: How ...


50

Wrong way round. Transitional arrangements are non-binding guidelines that the lenders can observe if they choose to. The borrower - like your friend - doesn't get to choose whether to use them or not. Your friend obviously can't afford the property, so if you do this, all I can say is congratulations on buying your new house, and I hope you got a deal on ...


49

If you are truly preapproved (not just prequalified) then they are required to supply you with a Good Faith Estimate within 3 days. The interest rate will appear on that document. It's subject to change until you lock it in, but there's no reason they can't provide an estimate now. Source: Title 12 of the US Code of Federal Regulations Except as ...


47

If your goal is to save money, then make payments (of whatever size) as early as possible and don't wait. There is no benefit in paying it in large chunks. Think of it this way: Your interest is a monthly payment based on the total amount outstanding on the loan as of that month. Reducing that amount means you are paying for fewer months on whatever you ...


43

My credentials: I used to work on mortgages, about 5 years ago. I wasn't a loan officer (the salesman) or mortgage processor (the grunt who does the real work), but I reviewed their work fairly closely. So I'm not an absolute authority, but I have first-hand knowledge. Contrary to the accepted answer, yes the bank is obligated to offer you a loan - if you ...


38

It is highly unlikely that this would be approved by a mortgage underwriter. When the bank gives a loan with a security interest in a property (a lien), they are protected - if the borrower does not repay the loan, the property can be foreclosed on and sold, and the lender is made whole for the amount of the loan that was not repaid. When two parties ...


37

You should only loan money to friends or relatives if you are fully accepting the possibility of never ever getting that money back. And in this situation it can happen that you will be forced to give him a very large loan if something bad ever happens to him. (Paying the monthly rates instead of him and expecting he will someday pay it back to you is ...


35

If it was me, I would work on getting the collections debts cleaned up before anything else. When you get your tax refund checks, call them and offer them between .50 and .75 on the dollar. Write one check not make payment plans. Get it in writing that the debt is settled. Don't give them access to your checking account, and if you do use a CC, to pay ...


32

A mortgage is simply a loan backed by a property (and, because it's both very large and very common, covered by some specific laws). As such, the bank isn't an "investor" in your house; it simply is lending you money with the property as collateral. So, it doesn't get any share of the profit. As long as you sell the house on your own, for more than you ...


21

This is definitely strange. I've had a number of occasions where I've contacted a bank and asked what their interest rates were on one type of loan or another, and they've always been very willing to tell me -- always with caveats that those are today's rates and they can change by the time I actually get approved, may depend on age of the car or whatever ...


20

You are going to need a lawyer anyway so check with him. But here is a path you might be able to go down. Put the house in your name right from the get go. He gives you the money but you sign over a promissory note to him so that you net less than $14000 (gift tax annual exclusion for the calendar year). He can gift everyone in your household 14k per ...


18

tl;dr: I think you can find a much better deal. Doing a strait refi will cost you some amount of money. However, a 2.5% fee ont top of closing costs seems really high. You can get a quote from Quicken loans pretty quick and compare their fee. Also I would check with a local bank, preferably one you already do business with. The 2.5% is probably their ...


18

I will expand on Bacon's comment. When you are married, and you acquire any kind of property, you automatically get a legal agreement. In most states that property is owned jointly and while there are exceptions that is the case most of the time. When you are unmarried, there is no such assumption of joint acquisition. While words might be said ...


16

It can be difficult when all your disposable income is spoken for. Your options depend on how good your credit is and how flexible your expenses are. I don't have all the answers without more details (possibly not then). However, couple of points of advice: Paying off that credit card debt (and not adding any more to it) is your #1 priority. You should ...


15

Just as a renter doesn't care what the landlord's mortgage is, the buyer of a house shouldn't care what the seller paid, what the current mortgage is, or any other details of the seller's finances. Two identical houses may be worth $400K. One still has a $450K loan, the other is mortgage free. You would qualify for the same value mortgage on both houses. ...


15

In my opinion you don't need to do much if anything differently. Keep on top of your payments and your credit score will improve over time (but is already quite good). If your cards have relatively low limits and are therefore frequently utilized highly, then it could be worth asking for increased limits to help keep your utilization down. Beyond that I ...


14

Something else to consider, even if your friend is on the up and up and never misses a payment: Until the house is paid off, any time you apply for credit banks will count the mortgage payment on your friends house against your ability to pay all your existing debts in addition to whatever new loan you're applying for. If you're renting a home now, this ...


13

Why doesn't it seem right to you? The lender financed the house and has the first right claim (mortgage) on it, so if you have any insurance proceeds they're first offsetting your debt to the lender. Same as if you were selling the house - first the loan is paid off, whatever is left goes to you. If the property is not lost, then the proceeds are going to ...


12

Okay, I'm just going to come right out and say this. Don't cosign this loan. Unless the difference in interest is very significant, this is all downside for you without much benefit for your girlfriend, unless your girlfriend has a will that leaves everything to you. Then it's just mostly downside for you. If you choose to ignore this advice, the minimum ...


12

Well, he could negotiate with the bank to pay off the loan before the foreclosure takes effect. That would obviously cost him a large pile of cash but might remove the foreclosure, and possibly the late payments, from his record. But the real answer is that, having signed the note, he should have been making sure payments occurred so it never got close to ...


11

Lets consider what would happen if you invested $1500/mo plus $10k down in a property, or did the same in a low-cost index fund over the 30 year term that most mortgages take. The returns of either scenarios cannot be guaranteed, but there are long term analyses that shows the stock market can be expected to return about 7%, compounded yearly. This doesn't ...


11

If you purchased your home on or after Dec 15, 2017, the limit is $750K. If the home was purchased prior to that, the limit stays at the previous limit of $1M (even if you refinance). In your case, your total mortgage value is $726,300 which is less than the limit regardless of when you purchased your home, meaning you can deduct the entire amount you pay in ...


11

The bank/building society will be concerned to maintain their security and will need to give their permissions. If things work out as you plan it shouldn't be a problem for them, but given that you are obliged by the planning permission to demolish the bungalow once you build the house, you should make sure you have the permission in advance. They may be ...


10

In a nutshell, not really. That's the risk you take when you co-sign for someone. The lender only made the loan because of the strength of your brother's credit, not your mother's, so his reputation (in the form of his credit rating) is going to take the hit because of his mother's behaviors. The one thing he can do is this: The credit bureaus allow you ...


10

Short answer: don't do it. Unless you know something that the bank doesn't, it's safe to assume that banks are a lot better at assessing risk than you are. If they think he can't afford it, odds are he can't afford it regardless of what he might say to the contrary. In this case, the best answer may be "sorry for your luck;" you could recommend that he comes ...


10

Both of you sit down with a lawyer who practices in real estate and foreclosures, and hash out every single possibility of what could conceivably go wrong, with nothing out of bounds. Come up with a reasonable and fair plan for resolving each situation, that you are willing to commit to, life and breath, for real, no exit. Put all of it into a legal ...


10

...my friend says they were told they'd have been approved if "I had a third line of credit at least a year old." This is called a "Tradeline Overlay". There are a normal set of rules that must be met for approval of all mortgages such as minimum credit score (typically 560-620 ish) and debt to income ratio (for example 45% or lower). Some lenders add an ...


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