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You are probably not eligible for an HSA based on your secondary coverage. From IRS Pub 969 (emphasis added): Qualifying for an HSA To be an eligible individual and qualify for an HSA, you must meet the following requirements: You are covered under a high deductible health plan (HDHP), described later, on the first day of the month. You have no other ...


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Delta dental states that lifetime maximums will follow people even if they change plans. However, the term lifetime is a bit of a mix between your lifetime vs the lifetime of the plan. If you switched insurance providers, you would have a new plan and the lifetime maximum may reset. Ultimately this will come down to the insurance provider and what their ...


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Yes, but there are plenty of situations in which the plan won't work There are relatively few situations in the United States in which you can be forced to receive medical services. Once you have received a service, though, you typically have to pay for it. And it is famously difficult (if not quite impossible) to determine how much a medical service will ...


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For situations similar to what is described here, almost certainly not. You are free to deny treatment or services. You can give medical power of attorney to someone you trust to approve or deny treatments if you are too ill to make decisions on your own. You can complete an advanced medical directive to tell whoever is making decisions on your behalf what ...


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Is the health insurance market competitive where you are, i.e., are there several insurers with rates at or below what you're paying? Especially if it's become more competitive and rates for new customers have ticked down, they may be proactively seeking to retain their customers. It is similar to a bank spontaneously offering to refinance your mortgage at a ...


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Stumbled upon the answer a year and a half later, in Pub. 535, Business Expenses: When To Deduct Premiums You can usually deduct insurance premiums in the tax year to which they apply. Cash method. If you use the cash method of accounting, you generally deduct insurance premiums in the tax year you actually paid them, even if you incurred them in an earlier ...


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When you go in for medical treatment, part of all the forms you sign, there something called a Billing Consent Form. It may even be part of the (Health) Insurance Billing Consent Form. It gives the medical provider the right to bill your insurance on your behalf. Most importantly, it essentially states that you will ultimately be responsible for any and ...


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In general in the United States a medical office has no idea if you or your family has meet the annual deductible. Even if they checked on the day you made the appointment, it could change 10 minutes later if you saw another doctor, or filled a prescription. It can even be made more complex if you are visiting a specialist, or if the provider is out of ...


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No, they don't, but we need to be very precise in what we're discussing There are a couple of ways your main question can be read: Will the new insurer cover a service that their insurance contract includes, even if I know I will need that service in advance of signing that contract? Can I obtain approval for a surgical procedure under my current insurance,...


2

No, they are not required to cover it. When you switch, you will need to have the surgery re-approved under the new plan/provider. The negotiated rates could be different, if you switch providers (insurance company) the doctor may no longer be in-network, the doctor/hospital's rates could change in 2021, etc. Your new plan may have a different out-of-pocket, ...


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