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1

This won't work exactly as you proposed. Each person can only contribute to their own HSA (meaning your wife can't contribute money into yours). Had one of you had an HDHP that covered both of you, then you could contribute the $7100 to that single HSA, but since you both have individual HDHPs, you must each have your own HSA with an individual limit of $...


9

Health Insurance/Private Medical Insurance in the UK is a luxury not a requirement The NHS in the UK is funded through National Insurance and general taxation that is taken from pay at source (generally), the amount of which varies by earnings of the individual. Access to NHS services is based on residency (if you live outside the UK but use NHS services ...


9

From HealthCare.gov (emphasis added): Deductible The amount you pay for covered health care services before your insurance plan starts to pay. With a $2,000 deductible, for example, you pay the first $2,000 of covered services yourself. So expenses that are not covered by your health insurance do not get applied toward your deductible (or your ...


7

Get liquid funds ready in advance, be prepared to put down sizeable cash deposits for services you can't or don't want to purchase outright, and try to negotiate discounts for paying bills immediately and in cash. I spent quite a few years working in the financial services office of a large hospital, and have personal experience dealing with this sort of ...


2

Does the employer automatically terminate COBRA as soon as a dependent is covered by a new employer? No, COBRA will not be automatically terminated. You can keep COBRA when you get new coverage, and the rules about what it costs or how long it's available don't change, although COB rules dictate that the COBRA plan will automatically be considered secondary....


3

Medical billing is a nightmare. Bills for major medical events can trickle in for months. In some cases they go directly to the insurance company and the only evidence you see is in the EOB (Explanation of Benefits). Other times you will be the middleman, they expect you to submit bills to the insurance company. Some of thee are in-network, some or out-of-...


-1

Not sure about Canada but insurance typically involves an open enrollment period or major life events. Open enrollment: For one month out of the year (specified by the employer) employees are allowed to freely sign up for, change, or cancel their insurance plan Major life events (when this happens you can make changes to your insurance): Change in ...


1

You can submit an application for insurance, but you must disclose all of your existing conditions and your family history. Anything that is relevant must be disclosed on the application form. If you neglect to mention your dentist's quote for the substantial work you need, this is known as insurance fraud (which is a criminal act). As others have ...


4

The Manulife link you provided says: Your coverage is guaranteed with no medical questions when you apply and pay your first premium within 90 days of your employee benefits ending. That implies that for new coverage, you will be asked medical questions. And of course your answers will affect whether they accept you, what your rates will be, and what ...


0

No, all dental insurance that I know of will have waiting periods for major work. Many will not have waiting periods for routine cleanings, but that won't help you. Aetna has a dental discount program without a waiting period. But, if you shop around, you can probably get work done for the same cost without the discount.


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