New answers tagged

2

In addition to the recommendations in the other answers, it is likely a good idea to place a credit freeze with the three credit bureaus — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. Your ex-husband has access to all of your personal information, including your social security number. It would be easy for him to open a credit account in your name. A freeze would ...


12

I've actually dealt with an almost identical situation more than once. Close your bank account and open a new one in your name. Then have the bank issue a fraud alert on all previous accounts. If your ex-husband and his girlfriend attempt any transactions of any kind on these accounts the bank will involve law enforcement and have fraud charges leveled ...


36

Ryan's Law: if it wasn't written down, it didn't happen The problem is, it's all just more "He said, she said" unless there is physical evidence. Collect evidence. Keep contemporaneous notes of everything You may remember James Comey describing a having a nagging feeling, right after a meeting, of "I really better take physical notes of that ...


6

In addition to the other answers I would highly advise the following cyber-security related precautions: Make sure that all passwords for banking websites, government websites, as well as email accounts are: Fully different from each other. No templates like SecurePhraseA1, SecurePhraseA2, etc. randomly generated ideally 20-40 characters long with every ...


19

If he has your social security number, and is handing it out, I'd at least consider trying to get a new Social Insurance number, which you can do if you are the victim of identity theft (clearly yes), and it's likely to recur. Also, get a lawyer, or just make a criminal complaint to the police about what has been happening.


66

Ask your lawyer if it makes sense to press criminal charges against your ex-husband and/or his girlfriend for attempted identity theft, harassment and/or fraud. Other than that you can only hope that the banks fulfill their promise and won't allow him to succeed. But should he somehow manage to access your bank account, you might be able to take legal ...


0

I'm sorry to hear that someone took (or tried to take) advantage of your willingness to trust, but that's how scam artists like this work. Your post doesn't say exactly WHAT "supplies" you were supposed to buy to do the job, but whatever they were doesn't change the fact this was simply a way to con money out of someone. And unfortunately they are ...


0

The big problem is that there were two accounts in your name. You should take steps to fix this immediately. Tell the "loan place", and insist that the other "account" be shut down. Then report it to the police. You have been the victim of identity theft. There are two possibilities of what happened, and another one that the loan place ...


3

My personal experience has been very low in encountering 3D secure when making online purchases. I can't say that I've seen any sort of increase over the last 10 years. I think the same concept from the linked 2016 question of "consumers don't want to be annoyed" continues to persist. According to statistics on ravelin.com, the national average 3D ...


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