New answers tagged

6

The "deaf person in a wheelchair" has been buying a lot of stuff for years! Actually, the scammer doesn't want your old dirt bike, and no one is going to show up to retrieve it. The scam is ultimately to steal money from you, either by identity theft or tricking you into sending them money. The message you received has been copied and pasted in ...


5

Yes, it's common for scams to start like this. I would be suspicious first the email/Message is pretty lengthy. Here is how the scam would most likely play out. Step 1: Send Paypal or Bank Transaction. Step 2: Courier agent picks up bike Step 3: Cancel/Reverse Paypal/Bank Payment Step 4: If you complain they will just say they never receive the bike/goods ...


0

It is fun to think about scenarios. These are extremely unlikely but possible. A prepared thief could have replaced your credit cards with counterfeit cards. You probably called the number on the card to report it lost/stolen. The counterfeit cards have a number where the thief's confederate pretends to work for the credit card. He or she may fish for ...


1

If the thief is prepared, they can easily get the info for each card in your wallet very quickly with a smartphone that has NFC, it would take someone less than 30 seconds to get the info of every card in your wallet. That's if you have multiple cards in your wallet, if you have a single card the wallet doesn't need to be opened to get the info (which comes ...


1

Here is a minor addition to the other good answers, something that could happen but you probably don't have to worry about. Here in the Netherlands, our debit cards support contactless payment which, up to a certain amount, doesn't require a PIN code. That amount used to be € 25, but they've increased it to € 50 because of the Covid-19 pandemic (as to reduce ...


1

Someone COULD have read data from your credit cards. Either superficially, by reading the numbers, or by scanning the magnetic strip or the chip. As you immediately notified your bank, you won't directly lose money, even if the details should be used before the cancellation had got through the system. You might have 'lost' personal information that would be ...


19

Everything is risk vs reward. You left your wallet on gym floor. A group of guys saw it and returned it to the front desk. I have two things to say - I managed a Golds Gym for a while and I also have worked out at a gym probably 200 days a year the past 25 years (started young). Your example is super super frequent. It is also sometimes annoying I ...


56

Don't be so paranoid! An ill-wisher would just have pocketed your wallet. Somebody did you a good turn by handing it in to the desk, so that nobody else would be tempted. Be thankful and stop worrying!


15

In addition to the issue with your credit/debit cards, you may be subject to future targeted phishing or identity theft attacks, depending on what's in your wallet. Addresses, pictures, loyalty cards, personal information and such may be used against you to lower your security awareness and/or attempt guesses at passwords and "verification" ...


27

If I’m prepared and have a camera ready I can take photos of all your cards and note the security codes on the back. With that I can make payments with your card. A stupid criminal could use that to have expensive things delivered to their home, a clever criminal would figure out how to rob you without getting caught. I could make lots of donations to good ...


3

A holding deposit of up to 1 week is normal when reserving a rental property. It is governed by the Tenant Fees Act 2019. The deposit is forfeit if you pull out without good reason; if the tenancy goes ahead, then it must either be returned or deducted from the first month's rent; if the landlord pulls out, then it must be returned. This does sound a bit ...


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