Hot answers tagged

142

Absolutely a scam 100% chance. This is one of the most common scams out there. Here's how you will get ripped off. They send you a check which will deposit in your account Seeing the deposit went through everything looks peachy, you buy and transmit bitcoins. The check bounces in a few weeks and you are out the money or owe the bank if that gives you a ...


105

He COULD use the signature to forge her name on a check or a contract. Of course that would be wildly illegal. Just because she gave him the signature voluntarily (under false pretenses) doesn't mean he's authorized to sign anything in her name. At a minimum, you should watch your bank statements and get copies of your credit report for the next few months....


103

The two basic rules for not getting scammed while apartment hunting are: Never sign the contract before you inspected the property in person Never pay money to inspect a property in person Carefully chosen pictures can hide a lot of nasty details. Pictures also don't communicate sound or smell. So insist on a tour of the apartment before signing the lease ...


99

When this happens, your bank should give you your money back. Your bank will then recover the money from the bank that accepted the check, and that bank will then attempt to recover the money from whoever gave them the check. You have found yourself on the other end of the usual counterfeit check scam. In this case, the counterfeit check that they gave to ...


79

If you didn't order it, it's free Ohio -- like most states, the US Federal government and the UK -- has a law like this one: Ohio Revised Code 1333.60 Voluntary delivery of unordered goods constitutes unconditional gift. Where any merchandise is offered for sale by means of its voluntary delivery to an offeree who has neither ordered nor requested ...


77

If you had a 50%+ roi trading opportunity, would your first response be to patiently ring up strangers and sell it to them? Big hedge funds fight each other to outrun the S&P by a few percentage points. Ray Dalio's pure Alpha Fund, which is literally closed to new investors has gained an annualized 12.5%. Think about that for a second. Someone with a (...


72

The two basic rules for not getting scammed while apartment hunting are: Never sign the contract before you inspected the property in person Never pay money to inspect a property in person Carefully chosen pictures can hide a lot of nasty details. Pictures also don't communicate sound or smell. So insist on a tour of the apartment before you sign the ...


65

The most likely result is that you'll send your "friend" their money and they will disappear forever. A couple of weeks after you've sent the money, the bank will find out that the original deposit was bogus:coming from a stolen check, a forged money order, or someone else's hacked bank account. The bank will then want their money back, and you will be on ...


64

Yes, it’s a scam. There are red flags all over it. Ask yourself whether you really think a huge multinational like Nissan would work in this way.


53

This is clearly an identity theft fraud in stages. To be specific, this is called one-dollar scam. Even OP didn't provide further information to the said entity, some data is already leaked into the scammer's hand (Here show some of the major data breaches). To fix it : Call the credit card issuer now by using the hotline number printed on your credit ...


49

I contacted a lawyer, told to talk to Dept of Labor, DOL said they will not get involved that this is between my and my employer. Advise? What employer? You are 100% not employed by Nissan Motors....


47

Statistically, one of the e-commerce sites you used your card on was hacked. Once every 2 years is above average for that kind of attack, but not by that much. There's no good way around those types of attacks, other than not saving your credit card details on e-commerce sites. It would be a good idea to double-check your computer security, though.


45

Most likely a "courier" will show up to collect them. Sending them back to the company before that, or at least telling the courier that you have already sent them if you can’t get to the post office for a few days, is probably the best strategy. *The "courier" being someone involved in the scam coming to collect the parcels anonymously, that way the ...


43

You are going about this wrong. To start with your actual question, no your friend's bank has no duty or right to tell you about anything that your friend did as part of their banking. What you need to do is this. Go to your employer and tell them you did not receive your paycheque. If they say it was delivered to your address get them to put that in ...


40

Lots of places have your wife's signature already. She signs greeting cards, letters, receipts, contracts, and all sorts of forms. Her signature is already out in the world. What makes this suspicious is that it's a signature with no apparent reason and an odd stated reason. Given your comment that you live in a suburban area with an unsecured mailbox, my ...


40

No, it's not common to replace your card so often I'm going to attempt an answer on this one to provide a few steps you can take to minimize your risk of having your credit card number stolen. It sounds like you've taken a few steps already, but there are definitely other ways for scammers to get ahold of your digits. Shred/burn Paper Credit Card ...


39

The beauty of them sending you the picture is that it is easy for them to send essentially the same picture to several different people. The routing number is legitimate (it will match a banking institution), the account number and name probably is too, but maybe not. The next step after you prove that the deposit was made, is that they will tell you oops I ...


36

ahh sorry for my confusing explanations but It was only one time when I tried sending $2000. The $6500 came through this morning without any problem. You have done it once already. That changes everything. What you did was probably illegal. You need to minimize the damage. You need to talk to a lawyer. And you need to do it now. Or even better, yesterday. ...


34

What bank account are you supposed to cash the check into? My guess is "yours", and that's a complete and utter proof of scam. There is absolutely and categorically no way that a reputable company like Nissan would have checks cashed into anything except a business account of Nissan's. It would be illegal and stupid to do so, and no legitimate company ...


34

No one appears to answering the stated question, so: How do you send money when you're not sure it's not a scam? Don't If you aren't 100% sure it isn't a scam, don't send money. If it isn't a scam, any renter or seller will acquiesce to any reasonable requests you have to make sure it's not a scam before sending money. Obviously scammers won't. Once you ...


32

Unfortunately we live in an age where a large amount of apartments and houses are being rented on sites like airbnb as well, not even inspecting the apartment is foolproof. Be wary of increasingly common scams of people renting a house/apartment on airbnb for a week and running with the money. The safest bet is probably to get a real estate agent from a ...


26

It's not really Nissan. The bank will put a hold on all but $100 of the check amount. After a few days, they will release the money, conditional on you making the money good if the check later bounces (read your bank agreement). You will go "haha, check cleared, money in the bank!" You will send the money onward via Bitcoin, which is irreversible. ...


23

What will likely happen after you deposited the scanned check is that the check will bounce after a couple days because it's either not covered or because it is from someone else's account. The money in your account will then go back to where it came from. But that alone doesn't get the scammer anything. Possible ways the scammer could benefit from this: ...


23

No genuine person would need you to prove that you'd deposited the cheque. Depositing a genuine cheque would be overwhelmingly to your advantage, so any genuine person would just take you at your word if you said you'd done it. And if they wanted to be sure, why wouldn't they just look at their own account to see if the money had gone?


23

Something like this happened to me in Britain. I returned from work to find a card from a courier company saying they had tried to deliver 2 packages, and to phone their depot. I did so the next day. They said "They were delivered to you at 2:30 yesterday - the computer says so!" I argued with that, and said I could prove I was 25 miles away at the time, and ...


23

It's hard to tell from what little information we have what exactly is going on, but one thing is sure: it's not normal. Whether your "friend" is trying to cheat on taxes, trying to steal from you, trying to steal from someone else, trying to steal from the company they pretend is theirs, trying to launder money, trying to cheat a financial institution, ...


20

It might be worth asking your bank for more details about the fraud (e.g. what triggered the fraud alert) because you might find that some perfectly legitimate sites are causing fraud errors. About a month ago I got a phone call from my (Australian) bank informing me my card had been disabled due to potential fraud. When I asked what triggered it, they told ...


20

Another possible reason is he is writing it off as paying you while he creates a 1099 that you got paid out 6500. You will be forced to pay taxes on it if he files it. He will be able to write it off for the company.


18

I have been in your shoes, and solved the problem. I followed all bank advice, but it didn't help at all. I finally switched to using strictly cash for all brick-and-mortar purchases, and the fraud stopped completely. I think it was gas pumps. Soon after I switched, I saw a CBC documentary on skimmers used on gas pumps, and particularly ones furthest ...


18

Places you could report this include: Your local police The bank on which the check was drawn The site on which you listed the car and were contacted by the scammer The phone company that owns the number you were given (if you can determine that, which you might well not be able to). I'm not sure when you say "Is there any chance of prosecution", whether ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible