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72

The two basic rules for not getting scammed while apartment hunting are: Never sign the contract before you inspected the property in person Never pay money to inspect a property in person Carefully chosen pictures can hide a lot of nasty details. Pictures also don't communicate sound or smell. So insist on a tour of the apartment before you sign the ...


55

This is clearly an identity theft fraud in stages. To be specific, this is called one-dollar scam. Even OP didn't provide further information to the said entity, some data is already leaked into the scammer's hand (Here show some of the major data breaches). To fix it : Call the credit card issuer now by using the hotline number printed on your credit ...


40

The beauty of them sending you the picture is that it is easy for them to send essentially the same picture to several different people. The routing number is legitimate (it will match a banking institution), the account number and name probably is too, but maybe not. The next step after you prove that the deposit was made, is that they will tell you oops I ...


24

No genuine person would need you to prove that you'd deposited the cheque. Depositing a genuine cheque would be overwhelmingly to your advantage, so any genuine person would just take you at your word if you said you'd done it. And if they wanted to be sure, why wouldn't they just look at their own account to see if the money had gone?


23

What will likely happen after you deposited the scanned check is that the check will bounce after a couple days because it's either not covered or because it is from someone else's account. The money in your account will then go back to where it came from. But that alone doesn't get the scammer anything. Possible ways the scammer could benefit from this: ...


18

That $1 from a transaction that day or at most a few days old is not unusual. Many vendors do that as the first part of the transaction process. I see this from gas stations, grocery stores, and even from places I have bought tickets. The real amount of the charge will appear in a few days. It could also be a charge that will appear every month. They said ...


15

Even for any landlord that wants to rent the apartment to evade tax process, it is too fishy to ask the renters to send money outside Austria to Italy. As some people already mentioned, anyone can rent an Airbnb apartment and take tons of photo to scam people, so sometimes see for yourself is not enough. Since the country tag is Austria, it seems the "...


13

Since this is in Austria, you can check the Grundbuch to verify who the owner of the property actually is. This can be done online and the price is about 12 EUR. We recently did just that for a shop we are renting. It's simply part of the due dilligence process. Taking copies of passports seems to be very common here, it is surprising to me as well (...


12

It’s a scam. That will probably develop into an “Advance-fee fraud” once you have bitten the hook. Advance fee fraud, is a type of fraud in which businesses or individuals are required to pay a fee before receiving promised stocks, services, money, or products, which ultimately are never given. The targets of the fraud receive a solicitation (by ...


10

Sounds like a scam. Call your bank and ask to speak to their fraud department and see if they know anything about this. You have 2 issues here: 1- You were scammed $1 2- You were given a number to ring. This is as bad as clicking on a phony website and giving them all your information. Speak to your bank ASAP about that $1 too.


9

PayPal, as a purchase. Ask him to invoice you for a purchase. You won’t hear from him again :) What's really happening here This is the backside of another scam they are working concurrently. That Chase account you're wiring to actually belongs to Susan Danvers, who lives in rural Pennsylvania and is thrilled to have a "virtual" office assistant job ...


7

This looks like a well known scam, at least in big cities in Spain. I have seen entries in serious platforms at least for Madrid and Barcelona. In this kind of scam the poster of the entry always is asking to send money to a foreign country, usually Italy or UK, claiming they are living abroad and they have to leave. They post a very nice apartment in a ...


3

Are you sure it's not a scam? An email from the bank - if it's not promotional - sounds fishy most of the time. It could be legit but in most cases if there is an unrecognized charge, the bank is usually interested to let you know as soon as possible - and email is not the best contact for that. In this case I'd expect the bank to call you instead of ...


2

Funnily, I was in almost the exact situation. I had quite easily found a place on a pretty popular platform as well. Before I moved in, I was staying in a couple of Airbnbs and one of the natives of the city freaked out when I told her the details. She said that not having a viewing is very uncommon and that it reeks of a scam, etc. At that time, I got ...


2

My best advice would be to start looking for a new apartment, and don't pay anything first and then 'sign' a contract. To me it seems that you would read 1 copy of a contract, pay the supposed mother, and he would hand you a different kind of copy... Or you would pay to the supposed mother and he would vanish.


1

This is a version of the "tutor scam." I'm an Arab Oil sheik or a member of the British royalty and I've sent my 15-year-old son to study in America. He needs a tutor and you come highly recommended. How much would you charge to tutor my son for 2 hours per week for 15 weeks? "Oh...say...$8000." Fine, I'll send you a check for $10,000. My son has a ...


1

A picture of a check, like the one they want you to use, IS NOT A SIGNED CHECK. Do not do it!! When law enforcement comes looking for you it will be you that committed wire fraud.


1

It isn't their account. It's either cunningly faked to take quite a long time to actually bounce, or it is a real person's account, e.g. Susan Danvers as I describe here. Asking for the deposit acknowledgement serves no purpose, it is merely theater to test/increase your confidence. The scam will come later, as they contrive a pretense to have you wire ...


1

I would find a trustworthy escrow service and ask the other party to agree to using it. You'll pay a fee for the escrow service, but it's worth it. The seller/renter will know your money is there, and you'll get the peace of mind that comes with knowing if it's a scam you get your money back (less the escrow fee of course).


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