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You can't measure something without a yardstick to measure it by. Remember that there's pretty much only one thing you can do with currency: buy something. The value of a currency is its ability to buy other things. So: If you're interested in the pound's ability to buy other currencies, look at exchange rates. If you're interested in the pound's ability ...


2

It depends on the country. For US, the IRS publishes annual exchange rates and a list of daily/monthly sources: https://www.irs.gov/individuals/international-taxpayers/foreign-currency-and-currency-exchange-rates For Canada, the CRA references the daily/monthly/anunual exchange rates published by the Central Bank: https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/...


1

The Forex market opens at 5 PM U.S. EST on Sunday night and the futures market opens at 6 PM EST on Sunday. Asia financial markets in general open about 8 PM EST Sunday night but there is pre-market activity. The markets could open drastically beyond stop-loss orders.


1

It depends on your credit card detail, you'll need to check the agreements. Typically, credit card charges are converted with the (very good) bank exchange rate, and then a 2.5 - 4% fee is tacked on (without explicitly showing on the statement, so you think you got a poor exchange rate). Some credit cards offer 0% fees, and they are obviously quite useful ...


1

I dabbled in futures a long time ago so I'll limit my chatter to options, which I have utilized for 30+ years. It's impossible to answer your question succinctly because there are a myriad of ways to trade options. You can be long or short. You can gamble aggressively with them and you can use them conservatively for income, as well as multiple ...


1

First note that the total and non-reportable numbers agree between the two linked reports. The difference arises when we look at how the two reports break down the market participants into categories. The tradester legacy report breaks down the numbers into only two categories - commercial and non-commercial - while the CFTC report uses a more detailed ...


1

Seems your simplest path is to find a bank/credit card that doesn't charge you foreign transaction fees. We have these in the US although I assume banks make up for it with a worse exchange rate, so you might end up paying this anyways. I don't know about Canada.


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