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A popular rule of thumb is to spend not more than 35% of your income on housing. Note that this should ideally include utilities, taxes and a budget for maintenance as well, not just rent or the mortgage payments. However, in many areas this is hardly possible for normal incomes. A more precise approach is to do some household accounting. Track all your ...


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I have never seen such an arrangement in practice, but there's nothing stopping someone from making one up. The main problem with such a scheme is that it needs to be reasonably priced. If you exchange a home worth X for some financial arrangement, that financial arrangement also needs to be worth X. If you (and presumably the seller) expect the housing ...


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What you propose is a variant of rent-to-own, so you may find something useful in that space. With rent-to-own, you can somewhat hedge a future decline in the home's value (as you seek), by acquiring an option to buy the house (and renting it in the meantime) rather than buying it up front. If the value declines, you can walk away and instead buy a house at ...


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You ask about legal impediments but you don't specify a jurisdiction. I'm hard-pressed to imagine that a country would outlaw such an arrangement but there are an awful lot of countries in the world. You'd certainly be free to negotiate such a contract in the US. On the other hand, it is highly unlikely that such an arrangement would be practical. You'd ...


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Lets assume this is a good idea, and that this is the plan you want to go forward with. when should I actually make the withdrawal? Is there an amount of time before applying for credit I should do this, or a smart strategy for timing or pacing it? Because it should only take a few days to go from Roth IRA to your bank account, there is no need to do this ...


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