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Operating Income or Loss and a Net Income. Is it the same ? No - companies can have revenue and expenses that are not based on the actual operations of the company - interest paid on debt is a common example. Net Income starts with the Operating Income (Operating Revenue minus Operating Expenses) ,and adds/subtracts any non-operating revenue/expenses. For ...


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NO -- Operating Income is NOT the same as Revenue. This company is a weird example - it looks like it's going BK. But, an example: Revenue = $100 --- Payroll = ($30) --- Office Rent = ($20) --- Operating Income => $50


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From your link: For example, holding a 2% portfolio position in stocks spread out through multiple sectors—such as financials, information technology, health care, utilities, and consumer staples along with fixed-income assets such as government bonds—represents a diversified portfolio. Suppose your portfolio is worth $100k. 2% of $100k is $2k. ...


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The reporting of financial data in round thousands is applicable only on the tabbed page headed "Financials". The tabbed page headed "Statistics", where you are reading the total shares outstanding, does not report figures in round thousands. Nor does the statistics page say that it is reporting in round thousands. For example, the reported earnings per ...


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If i’m not mistaken, common stock under the balance sheet under shareholder equity is the cumulative amount of “the value” of the shares issued!! 45,972,000 * 1000 is the total value of shares issued throughout the history The previous quarter was: 45,174,000 * 1000 The difference is $798,000,000. No clue what is is though. I’m assuming its the amount of ...


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I can imagine there are people selling on the secondary market at given interest rates, therefore the rate changes on the basis of those trades. No - the rate for a given bond is fixed, and is set by the entity that issued the bond (there are floating-rate bonds, but the rate is not determined by the market for that bond, but rather by some other "reference"...


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You could use something like a standard deviation formula. SQL server has STDEV.(But you should use something like Python, R, C++ or Google Sheets) So if the average stock price is $100 with a STDEV of $10 over the last 6 months. With 1 standard deviation, its 68% likely the price should fall between $110 and $90 tomorrow. if the empirical rule is ...


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