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2

SImple. Unless the company is publicly traded or will be publicly traded within 24 months, OR unless you are offered enough equity to demand a seat on the board... ...the shares have a value of 0. You have a market value. Demand it in cash.


0

[I] have $1k in savings, $1.25k in indivudal stocks that earned about 6% in the past year, and $500 in cryptocurrency (mostly BTC, ETH) that have earned 0% all time. I have about $28k of student loans at 6-8% (different providers). I don’t own any assets really and have a leftover income of about $1.2k per month after rent, electric, other personal expenses (...


6

FWIW, you unwittingly laid a trap by setting up your question the way you did, and half of your responders fell into it. How much you're spending on what right now is completely irrelevant. So are your current assets, because they're so small. Current debt is marginally relevant. The only questions that drive the "Financially Independent"/"Retirement" ...


4

In your current circumstance, the best thing you could do is pay off your current debt as quickly as possible while avoiding any new debt. If you paid an extra $1k a month towards your student loans, you could be debt-free in under 2 years. Even quicker if you diverted some of your monthly savings towards paying that off. In those 2 years, spend an hour a ...


3

spending (eating, eating out, clothing, leisure, other life expenses): 42% rent, gas, electric, internet: 20% For most people, these are the other way round, and rent is their single largest expenditure. If you've got a really low rent you're in an excellent position. by financial independence I mean enough to have bought a home, car, and maintain ...


5

I would recommend reading Mr. Money Mustache which provides advice on how to cut down on your living expenses, manage debt, avoid sinking money on things that don’t add value to your life, and offers tips on investing for retirement. I would also recommend reading JL Collin’s stock series which will give you a primer on how investments work, where to invest, ...


20

First off, I have to say "rent, gas, electric, internet: 20%" is phenomenal, do everything in your power to keep this at that % for as long as possible. Then, given the safety nets that are standard for most European countries, a large amount of savings isn't required. Unless that is, if you need a lump sum of money for a significant investment (real ...


0

Note that there are two very different issues here. Opening a bank account is one thing, opening a credit card account is quite another--you're effectively beyond the reach of any enforcement action, why would any bank lend you money?


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