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1

Disclaimer: I'm EU citizen (Germany, so not even Austria), so I don't really have insight from the outside. That being said, I'm not aware that the EU regulations would require an ongoing EU residency in order to be allowed to have a bank account (in fact, even homeless people do have a right to a very basic bank account - as long as their stay in the EU ...


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This site is very strict about recommendations about products and services, so I will not come up with any links to banks or other institutions, but I am trying to provide some hints. I assume that you currently have residence and an address in Austria and you have a current account in your name with a bank in Austria. So possibly, it will be the easiest to ...


1

Make sure to set aside around 20% of the gains in case you have to pay taxes on the capital gains*. And on the topic of taxes, you should look into tax free investment accounts available for your country. For example in the UK, there is the Individual Savings Account where you can invest tax free in either stocks or cash deposit with interest. There is a ...


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It depends. Actively managed funds which aren't tasked with following a specific index would certainly sell their shares in a situation like this. Passive funds which track an index would, naturally, follow what the index does.


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For almost all, the correct way to invest is to invest a certain percentage into stocks and a certain percentage into bonds. Given your young age, if you don't need the money for the next 10-20 years, 100% stocks or let's say 90% stocks / 10% bonds would be good. If you might need some of your money in few years, 50% stocks / 50% bonds could be a good ...


4

I've been in a similar situation a couple of years ago when I was 20 and started my studies. My first way was going to my bank and ask them for opportunities to invest my money. I told them quite the same about my risk-profile and knowledge about stocks and that I don't have the time to really manage my money as you wrote above. They offered me some funds, ...


3

The 10% accurately describes average growth of the long-term US stock market. It is a nice and round number. This number is also fairly useless. It does not account for inflation. This may or may not matter for your purposes, although it is easier to compare financial instruments without inflation. It does not account for taxes. Since taxes affect your ...


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Why is everyone on this site calculating an annual return of 10% or higher when in contrast it is not offered/not recommended by banks and financial advisers and where does this difference come from? With dividends reinvested, over the past 25 years, the SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) has returned an average annual return of 9% (14.6% over the past 10 years). ...


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I don't think you've been buying index funds I'm noting what they say on their website: CFDs are complex instruments and come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. 77% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs work and whether you can afford to take ...


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Member mhoran's comment was an answer. why not just invest with any of the dozens of mutual fund companies that have an S&P 500 index fund or ETF? The ETFs are more commonly not leveraged. Of course, some are, so you'll avoid those. But the ticker SPY is the most popular one and it reflects no leverage at all. You get the return of the S&P ...


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