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0

I see 2 possibilities: The justetf post you link suggests that it may help to get yourself listed as "experienced investor" to get access to these ETFs via your European broker. I'd certainly ask them. The second possibility is to open an international brokerage account in the US. That would also avoid to have a currency conversion everytime you do anything ...


3

If you have only EU/UK tax residency, you can buy any ETF with "UCITS" in the name - those conform to the new consumer information regulations. I gather that the expense ratios often aren't quite as favorable as the US domiciled ones, but I would do it anyway. Here are some that track the S&P 500: https://www.justetf.com/gb-en/find-etf.html?assetClass=...


7

As nearly everything, it has pros and contras. The benefit of having two assets is to be more diversified. If you have a tenant which ruins your property, and it is your only property, you are in a bad situation. If "only" one of two assets you own is affected, it is still bad, but not so bad as in the other example. On the other hand, as was already ...


1

Property A: 3-bed flat in a decent location, say worth $100k Property B: 2-bed flat in a marginally worse (but still decent) location, say worth $75-80k Person X and person Y both inherited 50% of the above properties and now there are discussions about how to best manage the situation. Without getting into details, the options agreed between X and ...


1

While the Freedom of Movement gives citizens the right to live and work in any EEA country (not just EU, not just Schengen), you do not have a right to zero bureaucracy. Whether you owe taxes in a country depends on the laws in that country. If you work in that country you may also have to register your business there, but this might depend on the legal ...


2

Fundamentally it is worth nothing - you are buying a bond that never pays any interest and never has to be repaid. It's not an investment. It's a financial instrument used to transfer money from the central bank to the government (as an alternative to "printing money"). If a company issued these (none ever has to my knowledge), then there might be some ...


2

Modern money is based on promises rather than intrinsic value. A $10 bill (banknote / cash) is a promise that its issuer (bank / government) will provide $10 value on presentation of that note. That value is likely to be in the form of another $10 note, but that’s beside the point. What would you expect to pay for a $10 bill, bearing in mind that you won’t ...


0

The first step of investment is investing in yourself, i.e.curb you urge on getting money back and aware of the cost, cost, cost! Benjamin Graham's book The intelligent investor is a good start. Behavior economics books like Daniel Kahneman Thinking, fast and slow, Richard Thaler Misbehaving will help you avoid many irrational investment pitfalls. Do people ...


6

Or can I just walk into my local bank? Yes, you would usually approach your bank. However, you wouldn't just "walk in", you would ask for an appointment with a financial advisor. Will a bank take me (a 20 year old university student with 2000 euro in excess savings) seriously? Of course they will. Most people pick their bank at your age and then stick ...


-2

Inflation rate Europe wide is different from the country where you live (or even better your personal spending needs). But if you want the money to be readily available there's probably nothing better then a 0.01% savings account or something is that region - again it depends on where you are in Europe (Euro zone as you question mentions Euro). Taking it ...


5

For almost all of history and in almost all places, this is just an issue of finding your best risk-free investment because interest rates have historically been higher than inflation (positive real interest rate). However, in Europe especially, almost all fixed-income securities have negative real interest rates and many investments now have negative ...


1

Europe is big. Which country do you live in? As you seem to need the money in the next time, I'd put it into an account where you can retrieve it in a short time. Eiter you take an offer from your bank (which might go from 0% to about 2%, depending on where you live), or, if you are from Germany, you could use a service like Zinspilot or Weltsparen.


2

The inflation rate of the Euro is currently quite low. It fluctuates around 1% per year. That means keeping 18k in a bank account with zero interest means a loss of purchasing power equivalent to 180 current € per year. This isn't all that much compared to other currencies, but it is not nothing. But you can cancel it if you find any way to invest your money ...


1

You can currently earn about 2% per year in the US with an online savings account. This may be more than your bank is paying. This is probably the best you can do if you may need the money in a few months. Note that over such a short period, both interest and inflation effects are likely to be small.


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