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Your equation, equivalent to the one here: Wikipedia EU APR can be expressed more simply for a monthly instalment loan as where s is principal d is periodic repayment r is periodic rate n is number of periods s = (d - d (1 + r)^-n)/r cannot be rearranged for r. It has to be solved iteratively or graphically as demonstrated here and ...


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Here’s the problem: Your bank has rules how to calculate your interest, and if you follow these rules, you can find out how much exactly you have to pay each month to end up with zero after exactly 3 years. APR has different rules. If you follow the APR rules with the same interest rate and the same monthly payments, you will have a different amount of money ...


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TL;DR: I want to move to the EU from the U.K. and keep the same pay (though not a Euro- using destination.) Is this possible? Yes, it is. If you are self employed and your income is not depending on where you life - it is trivial. You move. You keep your income. Assuming I can relocate is there any precedence for retaining the origin country/market pay ...


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The only answer is to simply use ofx.com (or a competitor such as transferwise.com) Sending a "wire" is laughable in the US. Don't even bother. (Don't even mention that the exchange rate you'll get is crap.) It's a nuisance to set up an account at ofx or the others, but once it is in place, everything is dead easy, one click. Source, we do this ...


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Definitely not the only way. Most banks will write you an international bank draft (like a cashier check but in in any currency), payable to anybody. They might mail it direct to the company, or mail it to you so you can mail it to them. This is usually the cheapest way to send large amounts. If it's a large company they may have a US branch or a US dollar ...


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KG & KGaA taxation in Switzerland Here is the excerpt from https://www.expatica.com/ch/finance/taxes/corporate-tax-in-switzerland-452226/ Corporate tax for sole traders, partnerships and limited partnerships In Switzerland, sole proprietorships, partnerships, and limited partnerships aren’t taxed in the same way as corporations. These kinds of companies ...


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Another countries with tax advantaged accounts are: Sweden: ISK (Investingsparkskonto = Investment Savings Account) France: PEA (Plan d'Epargne en Action or shared savings plan) In addition to those, some countries in the EU have low or no Capital Gains Tax. Belgium has only a financial transaction tax and the Netherlands calculates them in a way that keeps ...


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