25

With a power of attorney in place you can sign your own signature and print the following below: [your husbands name] by [your name] as Attorney In Fact If you endorse a lot of checks, it might be worth the investment to get a rubber stamp made that has the printed portion. I did that while my brother was overseas for a lengthy military deployment and ...


12

What you are describing may be forgery, which is a felony in most states. Only the payee can endorse a check. For anyone other than the payee to endorse a check is a serious crime and you can be sent to jail for it. Having a "joint account" is irrelevant. A joint account just lets multiple parties withdraw money from the same account. A joint account in no ...


8

Is that enough? Do I have to sign in addition to this? Do I have to include the business name also in the endorsement? Ask your bank. You need to ask them what is the information they want you to include on the stamp to properly endorse the check. You also need to ask them if it changes if you are scanning the checks and sending them the images. Once ...


8

Avoid talking to a person: Just use an automated system, such as an ATM or a cellphone app. Automated systems will ONLY scan for the RTN # and Account number at the bottom of the check (the funny looking blocky numbers). The automated system will not care who the check is made out to, or who is present, so long as you have an account to credit the money ...


7

You will need to obtain a new photo ID. You can check with your new state’s DMV office to see what the requirements are and how you can meet them. They may or may not accept the photocopies you have. You might need to obtain a new Social Security card (which you can get from the Social Security Administration) and a birth certificate, which is usually ...


7

Why do they have to endorse every check every time they want to deposit it? They told you why. They said it was because it was made out to one person and there were others on the account that could withdraw money from the acct., so endorsing it acknowledged that the payee still wanted to deposit the money, knowing others could take the $ out The ...


7

U.S. Treasury checks are treated differently than other checks. They are governed by 31 CFR Part 240. This regulation outlines the requirements for endorsing and presenting the check for payment, and the requirements are more strict than other checks. In addition, the regulations give the government extra ability to refuse payment of the check if it is ...


5

If it's also his bank account (a joint account), no endorsement is necessary. Simply print or stamp "for deposit only" in the area where you would normally sign to endorse, and deposit it. I never endorse checks; aside from it being a nuisance and waste of time, it also results in the payer receiving a copy of your signature along with their bank statement, ...


5

Yes, your son can deposit or cash the check. c/o is merely a direction to the mailman as to where to deliver the envelope and doesn’t give you any rights to the money.


5

When faced several times by a teller trying to require that both parties be present I simply resorted to scanning checks and submitting the check via their remote deposit system. They only cared about the two signatures, not the presence of the two people in front of them. Many years ago when we were first married we moved. The bank wouldn't accept me ...


5

If some clerk at the bank misses it, you may be able. Technically you shouldn't be allowed to. All three have to sign.


5

Since you didn’t tag with a country code, you are likely to get US centric answers. Mine is that when I opened a business checking acct, I was given a stamp. business name, acct number, for deposit only. I stamp and deposit via phone app, which snaps pictures of both sides. No signature.


4

If the endorsement is to you and you try to deposit the money into your account in your bank (i.e. one where you have an account), the bank will likely accept it for deposit only (will not allow you to get cash back wholly or in part). If the check is drawn on a Nigerian (or other foreign) bank or you look elderly or confused and unused to dealing with banks,...


4

According to the people responsible for the cheque and credit clearing system, no: https://www.chequeandcredit.co.uk/information-hub/faqs/crossed-cheques Is there any situation where a crossed cheque can be paid into the account of someone other than the named payee or recipient? Not for a cheque crossed ‘A/C Payee Only’ or ‘A/C Payee’. The Cheques ...


4

I’m sure you are correct, and if she were dealing with a bank, I don’t think she would have any problem with it. The check cashing service she is dealing with may have different rules, or it may just be a misunderstanding of the teller she talked to. She should try talking to a manager there. My final thought: go see your friend.


4

You mentioned that this was a high-trust situation where you all were trusting of each other and willing to open a bank account together. Given that high trust environment, here's an unusual solution that may work for you. Person B and Person C could each send a very limited power of attorney letter to Person A allowing Person A to sign checks from a ...


3

Okay, I went through a similar situation when my mother died in March of this year. The estate still needs to go into probate. Especially if there was a will. And when you do this, your husband will be named as the executor. Then what he will need to do is produce both of their death certificates to the bank, have the account closed, and open an estate ...


3

In my limited experience, bank tellers are very cautious these days because check fraud is so common. They are especially cautious when the dollar amounts get up to multiple thousands. I don’t know the circumstances that lead you to ask this question, but everyone might have a much easier time if you simply go to your own bank first and convert it to a ...


3

First: I recommend simply calling the bank in question and asking as this may be bank policy dependant. That said, it's almost certainly simple (at least in the US), assuming you are putting it into his account or a joint account. If it's a separate account, he will need to use "special endorsement" to endorse it to the wife, but he will have to sign. Do ...


2

I don't see any benefit to putting the least amount of text you can on a stamp. It normally says For Deposit Only to ABC Bank Account 1234 XYZ Company The bank name helps if the check were to be misdirected in processing and the account name for verification if your account number is miskeyed somewhere. This helps prevent headaches and lost checks. Ask ...


2

Talk to the mortgage company regarding how to proceed. My bank was the mortgage company so they wouldn't complete the deposit until I actually had the repair done and we provided proof.


2

The only alternative to having your very own monthly chain letter ("if you don't pass this letter on, you and three other people will lose money!") that I'm aware of is talking with a bank (you'll need to talk with a personal banker) or similar escrow service that will allow you to open an account jointly. The bank may or may not allow you to skip signing ...


1

I knew offhand that "treasury checks" are a different animal from what every one else uses, but no specifics. A litte google-fu and http://www.bankersonline.com/articles/bhv16n5/bhv16n5a8.html "U.S. Treasury checks are governed by their own set of rules, found at 31 CFR Part 240. Those rules govern the length of time Treasury has to examine checks, as ...


1

I've run into a variation on this--I was trying to deposit a tax refund check without having her endorsement on it. I've deposited plenty of other checks made out to her and without an endorsement. They confirm her name is on the account and it goes through. The teller told me there were special rules for refund checks, she couldn't do it because there ...


1

When I was in school many years ago, I was told that as long as everyone the check is made out to signs on the back, the check is as good as cash. But I can't say what the policy of a particular bank would be. The easy solution would be to deposit it through an ATM if that's available to you. The machine won't know or care who's physically present, and when ...


1

According to the National Check Fraud Center: Section 3-206: If the back of the check says it is For deposit only, then has the signature of the payee, that is a restrictive indorsement and it should be observed, but the person who affixed that indorsement can waive it. If Webster takes a check payable to him and indorses it "For deposit only, Webster", ...


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