190

You (or whoever is responsible for that) look into the old books to see if the payslips were paid out. There should also be a folder with old payslips where the ones in question should be missing. After that, the person in charge of cashing them in can safely do so. If there is no such thing, you(r manager) should cash in the slips as the price for an ...


77

If it was me, I would count the bonus lost. You need money to live, and they are not paying you so the answer is obvious: seek another job (or three). I'd have a chat with your manager about you stopping work and explaining that you are your family's sole source of income. How they react will dictate how you proceed. If they get all upset with you, ...


74

In the United States, an employer is required to verify identity and citizenship as part of the hiring process. The way that they do that is that they ask for documents. There are three lists. One list has documents that verify identity and employment status at the same time, e.g. a passport. A second list verifies just identity, e.g. a driver's license. ...


70

Talk to the owner or the manager. You don't want to be responsible for paying money for a payslip that already has been paid. As you have noted this is highly unusual for somebody to hold onto these payslips. While it looks like they were never paid there might be some other story. Maybe they were lost and the restaurant replaced them, and they will no ...


47

Not paying your salary is a form is constructive dismissal. That is grounds for filing an unemployment claim — possibly the fastest way to get money for paying bills that doesn't put you into further debt. You can still sue to reclaim the wages owed to you, but that will take more time.


40

An employer has absolutely no business in looking at the private bank accounts of their employees. Even suggesting this is a pretty outrageous demand. Maybe it's a misunderstanding and the account he would like access to is not actually your personal bank account on which you receive your personal salary, but a bank account with his money which you access ...


31

My fear is if I resign I will not get paid my salary or my bonus. You will almost certainly get paid your salary up through the time you stop working. You might need to have a lawyer fetch it for you, but that salary is yours. They must pay it unless they prove something serious like you didn't come into work for that period. Before trying a lawyer, see ...


31

This is 100% a scam This is how it works: You recently got a job online, as an "assistant". You don't know your employer personally (you say he "looks reputable" which means nothing), you've never seen them in person, in a way that let's you 100% confirm their identity or genuineness. What you have is someone who has set things up to appear genuine online -...


30

While there is no legal reason to have a minimum number of employees, there can be a practical reason. They want to look like a good solid investment so that investors will give them money, which is what an IPO is, really. Hiring lots of people is part of that. Once the investors are committed, they can cut expenses by firing people again. I have no ...


28

Congratulations on your raise! Is my employer allowed to impose their own limit on my contributions that's different from the IRS limit? No. Is it something they can limit at will, or are they required to allow me to contribute up to the IRS limit? The employer cannot limit you, you can contribute up to the IRS limit. Your mistake is in thinking ...


27

No, there is no minimum employee limit in order for a company to initiate an initial public offering.


23

The statement suggests that you worked 114.13 hours this pay period, not the amount you suggest (68.23+37.9+8). So that could be the discrepancy in yours and your employer's calculation. It looks as if your overtime computation is slightly more than double time. That is pretty generous. Additionally there are other contributors that add to income as ...


22

The biggest reason why one might want to leave 401k money invested in an ex-employer's plan is that the plan offers some superior investment opportunities that are not available elsewhere, e.g. some mutual funds that are not open to individual investors such as S&P index funds for institutional investors (these have expense ratios even smaller than the ...


22

If you have decided to do the degree, and are simply deciding whether to accept employer funding for it or not, take the funding. I see no difference between "my employer doesn't pay my tuition" and "my employer paid my tuition but I had to pay it back because I moved on". Therefore there is no downside to letting them pay the tuition. If you want to move on ...


21

When you work for a company, there are a lot of expectations of you: prompt attendance, follow instructions, accept criticism, handle all the work stress, and all the things that go with good performance and a job well done. In turn, the company has one obligation: to PAY YOU. On time, in full, every payday. What you are describing is not a job. They are ...


20

Careful. I would personally need a LOT more than $5 more per hour to go from W-2 employment to 1099 employment. It boils down to two reasons: (1) employers pay a huge amount of taxes on behalf of their employees, and (2) you would have to pay all of your own withholding up front. Your current proposal from them doesn't account for that. There are also ...


20

Businesses do not pay income tax on money that they pay out as salary to their employees. Businesses generally only pay income tax on profit. Profit is the money that comes in (revenue) minus the business expenses. Payroll to the employees is a deductible business expense.


20

Possibility 1: Reimbursement exceeds contributions You elect to contribute $1,200 to the FSA ($100 a month). In February, you submit $2,000 worth of expenses. You are reimbursed $1,200. In March, you are laid off. In this case, you've paid $300, but received $1,200. Your employer cannot compel you to pay the difference. Quoting Div 125, a provider: ...


20

It depends on what you mean by “overages.” FSA plans have a feature called “uniform coverage.” When you sign up for the plan with your employer, you are signing up for coverage up to a certain dollar amount and you agree to pay that same dollar amount out of your paychecks over the course of the year. “Uniform coverage” means that you are covered for the ...


18

I see four key differences. Usually a bonus is paid as a lump sum at the end of the year -- maybe a calendar year, maybe the anniversary of you starting with the company. I'll assume this is the case for purposes of discussion. So let's compare job A, which will pay, say 1000 foobars a month, with job B, which pays 900 foobars a month and a 1200 foobar ...


18

Your reasoning is sound, and you are correct. What most likely happened is that they withheld as if you earned all that within one pay period. That could be someone on the payroll end not doing the calculation correctly, or not knowing how to override the default pay-period calculation, or an inflexible payroll software that doesn't allow for exceptions like ...


18

You should alert the NY State Department of Labor here. Failure to pay salary is unlawful. I have to warn you, most people's experience is that they never get paid anything. In California, employee back wages are a preferred item in corporate bankruptcy. No idea about New York.


18

This is a money laundering or advance fee scam It's not a real job. You will discover that your "job" is "money handler" - He wants to transfer money into your personal account, and transfer that money out again. Right off the bat, this would be money laundering, but it's worse than that. The transfer out of your account will be good money. However the ...


16

It looks like there are errors, but I believe your total pay is accurate. The first error is that the app seems to double-count weekend hours. You worked 39.96 weekend hours, and they pay a little extra for weekend hours and record them on a separate line, they shouldn't be added to the total hours since they are already reflected in the other categories. ...


15

You're right about your suspicions. I'm not a professional (I suggest you talk to a real one, a one with CPA, EA or Attorney credentials and license in your State), but I would be very cautious in this case. The IRS will look at all the facts and circumstances to make a claim, but my guess would be that the initial claim would be for this to be taxable ...


15

Why do you think you are entitled to "fairness"? In this world you get what you get. I am pretty sure your employer is not paying you for how you "feel" either. And by-the-way turning up on time and not leaving early is not exceptional behaviour; it is expected behaviour. Bottom line: do you add more value to your employer's business then the new hires? If ...


15

There really are multiple aspects to this. The calculatory time value aspect: Assuming that job X and Y will in total pay you the same amount, the time value of the salaries in job X are higher because job Y pays a large part only in the end of the term. In practice, you can dismiss this pretty much since short term interest rates are, currently, close to ...


14

Now she wants me to bring them into the office to see if they are any good. Why are you invovled? Why isn't she coming to the office? How is this situation handled? Give them back to her and let her bring them in. Explain that you aren't authorized to cash anything except the ones that you hand out weekly, and let her take it up with someone ...


14

If you're getting your paycheck direct deposited into your account, they would need your bank's routing number and your account number. However, there's no reason why an employer needs to access the details of your bank account, so they shouldn't need any more information. You should definitely not give them your ATM PIN or online username/password. And if ...


13

There seems to be a lot of speculation here. How about a few concrete sources? From the U.S. Department of Labor: The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) does not require payment for time not worked, such as vacations, sick leave or federal or other holidays. These benefits are matters of agreement between an employer and an employee (or the employee's ...


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