189

You (or whoever is responsible for that) look into the old books to see if the payslips were paid out. There should also be a folder with old payslips where the ones in question should be missing. After that, the person in charge of cashing them in can safely do so. If there is no such thing, you(r manager) should cash in the slips as the price for an ...


109

This is scam. Companies do not offer jobs without qualifications. Plus asking you to pay by bitcoin is scam and can't be traced. Even bank transactions are difficult to recover. Don't transfer anything bitcoin or bank transactions or western union. Stop all communications before you give more information.


81

If it was me, I would count the bonus lost. You need money to live, and they are not paying you so the answer is obvious: seek another job (or three). I'd have a chat with your manager about you stopping work and explaining that you are your family's sole source of income. How they react will dictate how you proceed. If they get all upset with you, ...


74

In the United States, an employer is required to verify identity and citizenship as part of the hiring process. The way that they do that is that they ask for documents. There are three lists. One list has documents that verify identity and employment status at the same time, e.g. a passport. A second list verifies just identity, e.g. a driver's license. ...


70

Talk to the owner or the manager. You don't want to be responsible for paying money for a payslip that already has been paid. As you have noted this is highly unusual for somebody to hold onto these payslips. While it looks like they were never paid there might be some other story. Maybe they were lost and the restaurant replaced them, and they will no ...


53

In addition to the information in Andrew Timpson's answer, it is important to understand that the information is critical for the employer itself. A company with even one employee in another state is frequently considered by the other state to conduct business in that state. The employee's location may be considered a branch office of the employer; employer ...


48

Not paying your salary is a form is constructive dismissal. That is grounds for filing an unemployment claim — possibly the fastest way to get money for paying bills that doesn't put you into further debt. You can still sue to reclaim the wages owed to you, but that will take more time.


46

US employees are taxed based on where the work occurs. Each state has its own tax rate, and in some cases individual cities have income taxes as well. Companies need to know where their employees are working so they can perform the necessary tax withholdings, and remit them along with W-2 data to the appropriate authorities in each locale.


40

An employer has absolutely no business in looking at the private bank accounts of their employees. Even suggesting this is a pretty outrageous demand. Maybe it's a misunderstanding and the account he would like access to is not actually your personal bank account on which you receive your personal salary, but a bank account with his money which you access ...


37

No, private companies have no obligation to help you sell their shares. It may not be legal, but there is very little you can do short of suing the company. Great article about this from the Wall Street Journal here. You could approach the company and ask if they are interested in buying back shares, or if they know anybody who is interested in buying. But ...


31

While there is no legal reason to have a minimum number of employees, there can be a practical reason. They want to look like a good solid investment so that investors will give them money, which is what an IPO is, really. Hiring lots of people is part of that. Once the investors are committed, they can cut expenses by firing people again. I have no ...


31

My fear is if I resign I will not get paid my salary or my bonus. You will almost certainly get paid your salary up through the time you stop working. You might need to have a lawyer fetch it for you, but that salary is yours. They must pay it unless they prove something serious like you didn't come into work for that period. Before trying a lawyer, see ...


31

This is 100% a scam This is how it works: You recently got a job online, as an "assistant". You don't know your employer personally (you say he "looks reputable" which means nothing), you've never seen them in person, in a way that let's you 100% confirm their identity or genuineness. What you have is someone who has set things up to appear genuine online -...


28

Congratulations on your raise! Is my employer allowed to impose their own limit on my contributions that's different from the IRS limit? No. Is it something they can limit at will, or are they required to allow me to contribute up to the IRS limit? The employer cannot limit you, you can contribute up to the IRS limit. Your mistake is in thinking ...


26

No, there is no minimum employee limit in order for a company to initiate an initial public offering.


26

There are several ways to handle the situation. First, if the employer is large enough (not necessarily Google size, but just large enough) and already doing business in several locations, adding another employee in an existing location is much less of an issue than for a small or middle size business with no previous exposure to such situation. Second, ...


24

The company going public is probably your best chance of being able to sell your shares. Therefore, your first job should probably be to try and see if there are any indicators that this might still happen: scour their website and financial news websites for anything that might indicate that this is still a possibility. If you do still have contacts within ...


23

The statement suggests that you worked 114.13 hours this pay period, not the amount you suggest (68.23+37.9+8). So that could be the discrepancy in yours and your employer's calculation. It looks as if your overtime computation is slightly more than double time. That is pretty generous. Additionally there are other contributors that add to income as ...


22

The biggest reason why one might want to leave 401k money invested in an ex-employer's plan is that the plan offers some superior investment opportunities that are not available elsewhere, e.g. some mutual funds that are not open to individual investors such as S&P index funds for institutional investors (these have expense ratios even smaller than the ...


22

If you have decided to do the degree, and are simply deciding whether to accept employer funding for it or not, take the funding. I see no difference between "my employer doesn't pay my tuition" and "my employer paid my tuition but I had to pay it back because I moved on". Therefore there is no downside to letting them pay the tuition. If you want to move on ...


22

When you work for a company, there are a lot of expectations of you: prompt attendance, follow instructions, accept criticism, handle all the work stress, and all the things that go with good performance and a job well done. In turn, the company has one obligation: to PAY YOU. On time, in full, every payday. What you are describing is not a job. They are ...


22

Although it doesn't answer your literal question I think it is important to note that in the specific example you are citing, Facebook wants to adjust/lower the salary of an employee according to the cost of living in their locale. This is briefly touched in one of the articles you quote but more clearly in some other articles, for example https://www....


20

Careful. I would personally need a LOT more than $5 more per hour to go from W-2 employment to 1099 employment. It boils down to two reasons: (1) employers pay a huge amount of taxes on behalf of their employees, and (2) you would have to pay all of your own withholding up front. Your current proposal from them doesn't account for that. There are also ...


20

Businesses do not pay income tax on money that they pay out as salary to their employees. Businesses generally only pay income tax on profit. Profit is the money that comes in (revenue) minus the business expenses. Payroll to the employees is a deductible business expense.


20

Possibility 1: Reimbursement exceeds contributions You elect to contribute $1,200 to the FSA ($100 a month). In February, you submit $2,000 worth of expenses. You are reimbursed $1,200. In March, you are laid off. In this case, you've paid $300, but received $1,200. Your employer cannot compel you to pay the difference. Quoting Div 125, a provider: ...


20

It depends on what you mean by “overages.” FSA plans have a feature called “uniform coverage.” When you sign up for the plan with your employer, you are signing up for coverage up to a certain dollar amount and you agree to pay that same dollar amount out of your paychecks over the course of the year. “Uniform coverage” means that you are covered for the ...


18

I see four key differences. Usually a bonus is paid as a lump sum at the end of the year -- maybe a calendar year, maybe the anniversary of you starting with the company. I'll assume this is the case for purposes of discussion. So let's compare job A, which will pay, say 1000 foobars a month, with job B, which pays 900 foobars a month and a 1200 foobar ...


18

Your reasoning is sound, and you are correct. What most likely happened is that they withheld as if you earned all that within one pay period. That could be someone on the payroll end not doing the calculation correctly, or not knowing how to override the default pay-period calculation, or an inflexible payroll software that doesn't allow for exceptions like ...


18

You should alert the NY State Department of Labor here. Failure to pay salary is unlawful. I have to warn you, most people's experience is that they never get paid anything. In California, employee back wages are a preferred item in corporate bankruptcy. No idea about New York.


18

This is a money laundering or advance fee scam It's not a real job. You will discover that your "job" is "money handler" - He wants to transfer money into your personal account, and transfer that money out again. Right off the bat, this would be money laundering, but it's worse than that. The transfer out of your account will be good money. However the ...


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